Woolworths, Coles to raise tap-and-go limit to $200 – Finance – Hardware – Networking – Software- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

Australia’s two biggest supermarkets Woolworths and Coles will raise their dollar limits for contactless transactions without PIN numbers from $100 to $200 in a bid to stop further COVID-19 infections by lessening the use of payment terminal keypads.
The move comes, iTnews has confirmed, after the two grocery giants agitated strongly for the lift to the government, prevailing on global credit card schemes Mastercard and Visa as well as regulators and Tempemail Cabinet to raise the current $100 limit until the spread of the virus subsides.
The official announcement of the lifting of the contactless limit is scheduled for Friday morning, however it is already working in some supermarkets.
Woolworths chief executive Brad Banducci has been publicly outspoken about the need for the contactless limit to rise.
Customers using Apple Pay to tap via glass will also be roped in under the raised limit.
Importantly, eftpos transactions linked to Apple Pay – which is offered by ANZ, Suncorp and raft of smaller banks – will also be PIN free to $200. Bank issued eftpos cards that use tap, like the classic CBA Keycard, will also work.
Less clear is how other merchants will be treated.
Coles and Woolworths are classed as ‘strategic merchants’ under payment card interchange fees because of the volume of transactions they push. This means the supermarkets get lower card interchange fees, money that is shunted between issuing banks.
One issue is that while Australia’s biggest retailers might be doing the right thing in terms of hygiene, if smaller merchants are not roped in, it will effectively steer customers to the supermarkets with the most market power.
A further issue is that the push to get people to use contactless transactions overall will deliver a handsome revenue windfall to credit card giants Mastercard and Visa because the bulk of debit-based tap-and-go transactions ride on their so-called proprietary rails.
The Reserve Bank of Australia has been pushing for banks to further roll out a regulatory reform known as least cost routing, also know as merchant choice routing, that lets shopkeepers set the rails transactions ride on rather than the banks and the card schemes.
Shopkeepers are already on the warpath over tap fee gouging having formed a fightback group earlier this year. 
With the RBA’s review of payments systems regulation and now on hold until next year, and consumers being urged to tap more than ever, an obvious and real question arises as to whether there is now a case for more immediate regulatory measures.  
Coles and Woolworths are being contacted for comment.

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Woolworths, Coles to raise contactless PIN-free limit to $200 – Finance – Hardware – Networking – Software- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

Australia’s two biggest supermarkets Woolworths and Coles will raise their dollar limits for contactless transactions without PIN numbers from $100 to $200 in a bid to stop further COVID-19 infections by lessening the use of payment terminal keypads.
The move comes, iTnews has confirmed, after the two grocery giants agitated strongly for the lift to the government, prevailing on global credit card schemes Mastercard and Visa as well as regulators and Tempemail Cabinet to raise the current $100 limit until the spread of the virus subsides.
The official announcement of the lifting of the contactless limit is scheduled for Friday morning, however it is already working in some supermarkets.
Woolworths chief executive Brad Banducci has been publicly outspoken about the need for the contactless limit to rise.
Customers using Apple Pay to tap via glass will also be roped in under the raised limit.
Importantly, eftpos transactions linked to Apple Pay – which is offered by ANZ, Suncorp and raft of smaller banks – will also be PIN free to $200. Bank issued eftpos cards that use tap, like the classic CBA Keycard, will also work.
Less clear is how other merchants will be treated.
Coles and Woolworths are classed as ‘strategic merchants’ under payment card interchange fees because of the volume of transactions they push. This means the supermarkets get lower card interchange fees, money that is shunted between issuing banks.
One issue is that while Australia’s biggest retailers might be doing the right thing in terms of hygiene, if smaller merchants are not roped in, it will effectively steer customers to the supermarkets with the most market power.
A further issue is that the push to get people to use contactless transactions overall will deliver a handsome revenue windfall to credit card giants Mastercard and Visa because the bulk of debit-based tap-and-go transactions ride on their so-called proprietary rails.
The Reserve Bank of Australia has been pushing for banks to further roll out a regulatory reform known as least cost routing, also know as merchant choice routing, that lets shopkeepers set the rails transactions ride on rather than the banks and the card schemes.
With the RBA’s review of payments systems regulation and now on hold until next year, and consumers being urged to tap more than ever, an obvious and real question arises as to whether there is now a case for more immediate regulatory measures.  
Coles and Woolworths are being contacted for comment.

Tempemail , Tempmail Temp email addressess (10 minutes emails)– When you want to create account on some forum or social media, like Facebook, Reddit, Twitter, TikTok you have to enter information about your e-mail box to get an activation link. Unfortunately, after registration, this social media sends you dozens of messages with useless information, which you are not interested in. To avoid that, visit this Temp mail generator: tempemail.co and you will have a Temp mail disposable address and end up on a bunch of spam lists. This email will expire after 10 minute so you can call this Temp mail 10 minute email. Our service is free! Let’s enjoy!

Woolworths reveals its online delivery battle plan ahead of lockdown – Finance – Networking – Software – Storage- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

Grocery behemoth Woolworths has gone into overdrive to prepare its online delivery network for what many believe will be a protracted national lockdown because of the COVID-19 pandemic, with chief executive Brad Banducci revealing the retailer is trying to hire 20,000 casuals.
Revealed this morning, the epic hiring round will literally put boots on the ground to deal with a huge anticipated surge in online orders now understood to be being manually prioritised under Woolworths, with eCommerce hiring staff listed as part of the emergency push.
“As we do this, we will have more hours for existing team members and additional roles to fill as we focus on meeting the needs of our customers and communities,” Woolworths chief executive Brad Banducci said. 
“These new roles will not only help us better serve the increase in demand we’re seeing in stores right now, but also allow us to scale up home delivery operations in the months ahead.”
The triage of Woolworths already very large online ordering and fulfilment network to keep it running is an epic feat, not least because the system was never really designed with having to serve the whole of Australia all at the same time.
Prior to the arrival of COVID-19, most major grocery online orders only made up around four to five percent of sales value, with the online systems of both Coles and Woolworths shuttered to regular, non-prioritised customers after they failed to cope with the broader surge in panic sales.
Last week UBS estimated that grocery sales were up 25 percent year on year just on the back of the recent buying surge alone.
But a lot has changed since then, not least the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission green-lighting usually banned collaboration between Woolworths, Coles, Metcash and ALDI.
The move means the retailers will be able to better coordinate the distribution of stock across their physical and online networks.
Yesterday Woolworths revealed it had slashed trading hours across 41 stores around Australia, with affected stores only opening from 11am to 6pm “to support prioritising the delivery of groceries to the homes of vulnerable customers.”
Dubbed ‘Priority Delivery Hubs’, the designated stores have essentially been turned into crisis online fulfilment depots and will use their extra retail downtime to pick and pack orders.
“These 41 ‘Priority Delivery Hubs’ will use the additional hours the stores are not open to customers to pick online orders, with a focus on meeting the increased demand from ‘Priority Assistance’ customers which includes the elderly, people with disability, those with compromised immunity and people in mandatory isolation,” Woolworths said in a statement.
Woolworths currently operates around 1000 supermarkets and food sites across Australia, so there is clearly some headroom left in the Priority Delivery Hub model.
Woolworths arch rival Coles is also pivoting to ramp up online efforts after it also shuttered its web service, saying this week it will have its Coles Online Priority Service up and running next week.

Tempemail , Tempmail Temp email addressess (10 minutes emails)– When you want to create account on some forum or social media, like Facebook, Reddit, Twitter, TikTok you have to enter information about your e-mail box to get an activation link. Unfortunately, after registration, this social media sends you dozens of messages with useless information, which you are not interested in. To avoid that, visit this Temp mail generator: tempemail.co and you will have a Temp mail disposable address and end up on a bunch of spam lists. This email will expire after 10 minute so you can call this Temp mail 10 minute email. Our service is free! Let’s enjoy!

Woolworths pushes banks, govt to raise tap-and-go limit from $100 to $250 – Finance – Hardware- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

Woolworths has asked the government and banks to raise the limit of contactless card transactions from $100 to $250 to prevent hundreds of thousands of customers interacting with PIN pads during a pandemic.
CEO Brad Banducci told ABC Radio’s Drive program yesterday afternoon that the idea had been raised during a 1.30pm meeting yesterday by the Supermarket Taskforce.
Formed by the Department of Home Affairs earlier this week, the taskforce aims to break the retail logjam with “representatives from government departments, supermarkets, the grocery supply chain and the ACCC” on the body.
Banducci saw raising tap-and-go payment limits as important and believed previous barriers to doing so would fall away.
“We’re encouraging tap-and-go [bcause] the less touchpoints there are, the less risk there is of course in the store,” he told ABC Radio.
On the current $100 limit without needing to use a PIN, Banducci said: “This is an issue we raised at the supermarket government taskforce at 1.30 today. 
“We’ve asked the government to work with us to see whether we can raise the limit to $250 actually, and if we did that, there would be 350,000 less physical interactions required between our customers and a PIN pad.”
Banducci did not immediately quantify the time period that 350,000 number referred to.
“I’m not saying we’re going to [raise the limit] but it is one of the things that we’ve raised the financial institutions as well as the government [as] just another small measure that will help,” Banducci said.
However, quizzed on whether he thought authorities were receptive, Banducci said: “I think we’re really coming together as a community and as a society over the last week. 
“It’ll happen – in my view it’s just a question of when. 
“It’s a question of hours or days.
“We’re not in the ‘if’ anymore, which I think is very pleasing.”

Tempemail , Tempmail Temp email addressess (10 minutes emails)– When you want to create account on some forum or social media, like Facebook, Reddit, Twitter, TikTok you have to enter information about your e-mail box to get an activation link. Unfortunately, after registration, this social media sends you dozens of messages with useless information, which you are not interested in. To avoid that, visit this Temp mail generator: tempemail.co and you will have a Temp mail disposable address and end up on a bunch of spam lists. This email will expire after 10 minute so you can call this Temp mail 10 minute email. Our service is free! Let’s enjoy!

Woolworths, Coles move online delivery to war footing – Networking – Security- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

Australian supermarkets and grocers are preparing to move their online sales and deliveries operations to a coordinated war footing to help ensure essential supplies get through to vulnerable and isolated people as the nation increasingly shuts down to arrest the spread of COVID-19.
After more than a fortnight of suspended services and limited deliveries to cope with logistics issues that have left supermarkets stripped of stock, the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission late Monday gave the green light to immediate coordination between retailers.
The interim authorisation allows the grocery industry to “coordinate with each other when working with manufacturers, suppliers, and transport and logistics providers” – collaboration that would usually fall foul of anti-collusion regulations.
It covers Coles, Woolworths, Aldi and Metcash (IGA) “and will also apply to any other grocery retailer wishing to participate,” the ACCC said.
The authorisation does not apply to pricing, an important carve out aimed at preventing any outbreak of price gouging.
Aside from unprecedented demand and limited resources, one of the main reasons supermarkets’ online capabilities and delivery services have been broadly suspended is that stock levels in-store and across the broader supply chain have been hit by successive waves of panic buying.
Last week market analysts estimated supermarket sales were up 25 percent year on year on the back of fear purchasing.
Since then both Coles and Woolworths have been gradually rebuilding their respective online delivery services to prioritise vulnerable and isolated people, with varying degrees of progress.
Woolworths has launched what it calls a ‘Priority Assistance’ that requires people to register and provide supporting documentation about their circumstances.
The link to the Woolworths application form is here.
Woolworths says it will review and respond to requests within 48 hours, with eligible customers listed as “seniors, people with a disability and those with compromised immunity or who are required to self-isolate.”
Coles is also in the process of launching the more onerous sounding Coles Online Priority Service (COPS) but is telling customers it will not be ready until next week.
According to Coles the COPS service “will be phased [in] to ensure we can meet the delivery needs of our customers most in need at this time.”
Both supermarkets will carry limits on many stock items to guard against binge buying.
A Woolworths spokesperson told iTnews that it is now “ramping up delivery capacity out of our dedicated online customer fulfilment centres in order to service as many vulnerable customers as possible.”
“We understand the decision to suspend delivery operations out of our stores will be incredibly frustrating for customers and apologise for the inconvenience it will no doubt cause, the Woolies spokesperson said.
“It is a difficult but necessary decision that will allow our store team members to prioritise the restocking of our shelves in the face of unprecedented demand.”
A spokesperson for Coles told iTnews it is “introducing some temporary measures across our online business during the coronavirus outbreak to ensure that all Australians have access to their share of grocery items.”
“These measures will help ensure people’s safety and wellbeing, while also ensuring we can continue to provide food and groceries for all Australians,” the Coles spokesperson said.
“We have a dedicated team working through a list of vulnerable customers and businesses (such as nursing homes, child care centres, remand centres, charities and disability agencies) and we will be in touch with them in the coming days to determine how we can continue to deliver to them during this period.”
The Coles spokesperson said remote delivery customers still had access to place orders through the Coles Online website “in conjunction with their third party delivery provider.” 
Aside from the general online pile on – which yesterday choked myGov – grocery retailers have faced a raft of physical and legal challenges to keep operating.
They include getting restrictions on delivery windows lifted, and access to emergency labour supply, like lifting the number of hours students on visas who can work.  
At the same time the Department of Home Affairs has formed “a Supermarket Taskforce” to break the retail logjam with “representatives from government departments, supermarkets, the grocery supply chain and the ACCC” on the body.
The interim authorisation issued to supermarkets Monday evening flowed directly from recommendations of the Supermarket Taskforce.
“We have worked very swiftly to consider this interim authorisation application, because of the urgency of the situation, and its impact on Australian consumers,” ACCC chair Rod Sims said.

Tempemail , Tempmail Temp email addressess (10 minutes emails)– When you want to create account on some forum or social media, like Facebook, Reddit, Twitter, TikTok you have to enter information about your e-mail box to get an activation link. Unfortunately, after registration, this social media sends you dozens of messages with useless information, which you are not interested in. To avoid that, visit this Temp mail generator: tempemail.co and you will have a Temp mail disposable address and end up on a bunch of spam lists. This email will expire after 10 minute so you can call this Temp mail 10 minute email. Our service is free! Let’s enjoy!

Inside Woolworths, Coles online delivery shutdown – Finance – Cloud – Networking- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

Punch-ups in supermarket aisles. Panic pasta buying. A national obsession with toilet tissue.
And a freeze on online sales.
Australia’s national flip-out might make for torrid nightly news and massive social media traffic, but it’s time for a bit of a sanity check.
The reality, no matter which way you spin it, is that the infrastructure that underpins Australia’s still nascent online grocery delivery market was just never going to cope with the COVID-19 surge.
Not because the online checkouts froze, not because of DDoS like traffic and not because of a shortage of goods.
Coles’ and Woolies’ online portals are down because when real panic grips, there is simply not the human or robotic muscle to deliver on demand spikes that seemingly vortex in on themselves, snowballing as they go.
Here’s why.
The surge that physically broke online
Let’s start with a well-reasoned guesstimate and a bit of a timeline. UBS broker Ben Gilbert reckons supermarket sales are up at least 25 percent year-on-year thanks to the recent hoarding epidemic that is spreading a lot faster than the virus itself.
That’s not just big, it’s huge, and will deliver a pretty big bump to grocery retailers’ topline revenue in a sector that has recently been challenged by the drought and a summer holiday season devastated by bushfires.
You – quite literally and evidently – can’t replenish the stores from the warehouse at that rate, let alone fulfil click-and-collect and online delivery.
So, in this digital age when decent payments outages can hammer an economy, the inability of Coles and Woolworths to deliver groceries reverberated loudly through the echo chamber of fear.
It didn’t help that the online retailing industry has for years super-hyped major buying events – think Black Friday and Cyber Monday – seeking to create a FOMO (fear of missing out) frenzy to propel emotion driven sales rather than rational ones.
The great FOMO unfolds
The timeline of events is instructive.
Last week both Woolworths and Coles revealed their online shopping systems had surged past actual delivery capacity the week prior and then tried to get them up and running again.
There was probably an appetite, definitely the option, to shutter online grocery sales there and then until the COVID-19 rampage ran its course, but the optics would have been pretty awful and potentially could have fueled already rampant fears.
Over the next week, with physical stores badly depleted and trucks unable to keep up with demand for restocking, it became clear both Woolies’ and Coles’ online grocery portals were becoming logistically untenable.
So on Sunday Woolworths reached for a crucial circuit breaker and took the unprecedented step of shelving online delivery from its Victorian supermarkets as well as pausing click-and-collect from stores until further notice.
Coles on Monday put similar contingency measures in place, with both of the grocery giants’ online offerings having wobbled badly in terms of fulfilment early last week.
On Tuesday UBS belled the cat in terms of hoarding volumes with its 25 percent year-on-year increase estimate, a particularly awkward number that logically translates to significantly increased earnings for supermarkets.
On Wednesday morning Prime Minister Scott Morrison used a press conference to castigate Australia’s FOMO obsession and hoarding habit, demanding that people just “stop it”.
Confronted by stores with empty shelves, Woolworths Group CEO Brad Banducci on the same day imposed purchasing volume limits across Woolworths’ range with no re-opening of online sales in sight.
On the same day, Labor’s shadow minister for local government hopped into some councils not lifting truck delivery window restrictions to let supplies in.
Technology vs the people
For consumers raised on a steady diet of hyper convenience primarily enabled by online shopfronts and apps – Coles’ partnership with Uber Eats is emblematic here – the sight of empty shelves is naturally confronting.
A year ago, both Coles and Woolies were scrambling to deal with the meal home delivery phenomenon as dark kitchens sprang-up left and right to eat their share of the shopping basket.
Come dinnertime, the number of food delivery riders clogging inner metro roads became a staple of drive time radio complaints as food apps went all-out for market share.
That flipped with the virus landing in Australia as the limits of technology were exposed.
Until recently, it was the issue of technological performance and execution, especially online, that was the investor litmus test for supermarkets and retailers more broadly as commerce moved from bricks to clicks.
The issue that has now been exposed is that there’s a very physical mismatch around expectations of what technology can physically deliver. In a store you can see the shelves are empty. Online, you’re scrolling item by item.
How we got here: psychology and scale
In simple terms, the problem is as soon as the online doors open, the stampede begins with demand so aggressively outstripping finite online fulfilment capacity the channel becomes choked.
Anyone that’s ever sat through the lengthy investor analyst calls that accompany Woolworths’ and Coles’ annual and half yearly profit updates will have heard both grocers aggressively talk up their online sales that, until the last six months, have been profit margin dilutive.
Even then, additional profit margin over conventional in store sales is so skinny it isn’t material and is not disclosed.
In August 2019 Woolworths told investors online sales were worth around 4.2 percent of revenue at $2.5 billion, a hike of 32 percent over the previous year. 
That same reporting season, Coles bowled-up a 30 percent hike in online sales to $1.1 billion.
Click-and-collect has been the big winner in terms of improved profit margin, but no matter which way you look at it online is still a single figure fraction of overall store sales volume.
Given the UBS 25 percent year on year estimate of the scale of the surge, it’s clear there would be no way capacity could ever meet demand for delivery given the fact supermarkets were already trying to shift online shopping to collection in store.
So when consumers see pictures of physical shelves stripped bare, not to mention the legitimate fear of crowds, they hit the online channel with everything they have.
But there’s a kicker and it’s a big one. If Coles and Woolworths actually tried to deliver the kind of volumes online that customers were demanding, it would seriously strip urgently needed capacity out of its visibly strained store network, arguably fueling further panic and fear.
Industry sources say the figure the supermarkets are now citing is increased daily sales volume of 160 percent.
Emergency delivery
Online delivery may be suspended for Woolworths and Coles for the time being, but that probably won’t mean the trucks will remain idle for long.
Both Coles and Woolies’ delivery networks and fulfilment centres are a national distribution resource that could well yet play a vital role in the event of geographic population lockdowns – if they hit.
Controlled emergency distribution using the supermarket fridged truck fleet to areas with heavy restrictions is logical and likely already being wargamed, especially for elderly and vulnerable people who already used the online delivery services.
This scenario would also need some sort of web interface so that vulnerable people in need or those areas designated for isolation to order, but it would clearly need to have access restricted and authorised.
Both WooliesX and Coles have major web development and the agile skills to have such a service up and running quickly.
They may not be talking publicly about it, but the chances are they are working on just such a scenario right now.

Tempemail , Tempmail Temp email addressess (10 minutes emails)– When you want to create account on some forum or social media, like Facebook, Reddit, Twitter, TikTok you have to enter information about your e-mail box to get an activation link. Unfortunately, after registration, this social media sends you dozens of messages with useless information, which you are not interested in. To avoid that, visit this Temp mail generator: tempemail.co and you will have a Temp mail disposable address and end up on a bunch of spam lists. This email will expire after 10 minute so you can call this Temp mail 10 minute email. Our service is free! Let’s enjoy!

Inside Woolworths, Coles online delivery shut down – Finance – Cloud – Networking- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

Punch-ups in supermarket aisles. Panic pasta buying. A national obsession with toilet tissue.
And a freeze on online sales.
Australia’s national flip-out might make for torrid nightly news and massive social media traffic, but it’s time for a bit of a sanity check.
The reality, no matter which way you spin it, is that the infrastructure that underpins Australia’s still nascent online grocery delivery market was just never going to cope with the COVID-19 surge.
Not because the online checkouts froze, not because of DDoS like traffic and not because of a shortage of goods.
Coles’ and Woolies’ online portals are down because when real panic grips, there is simply not the human or robotic muscle to deliver on demand spikes that seemingly vortex in on themselves, snowballing as they go.
Here’s why.
The surge that physically broke online
Let’s start with a well-reasoned guesstimate and a bit of a timeline. UBS broker Ben Gilbert reckons supermarket sales are up at least 25 percent year-on-year thanks to the recent hoarding epidemic that is spreading a lot faster than the virus itself.
That’s not just big, it’s huge, and will deliver a pretty big bump to grocery retailers’ topline revenue in a sector that has recently been challenged by the drought and a summer holiday season devastated by bushfires.
You – quite literally and evidently – can’t replenish the stores from the warehouse at that rate, let alone fulfil click-and-collect and online delivery.
So, in this digital age when decent payments outages can hammer an economy, the inability of Coles and Woolworths to deliver groceries reverberated loudly through the echo chamber of fear.
It didn’t help that the online retailing industry has for years super-hyped major buying events – think Black Friday and Cyber Monday – seeking to create a FOMO (fear of missing out) frenzy to propel emotion driven sales rather than rational ones.
The great FOMO unfolds
The timeline of events is instructive.
Last week both Woolworths and Coles revealed their online shopping systems had surged past actual delivery capacity the week prior and then tried to get them up and running again.
There was probably an appetite, definitely the option, to shutter online grocery sales there and then until the COVID-19 rampage ran its course, but the optics would have been pretty awful and potentially could have fueled already rampant fears.
Over the next week, with physical stores badly depleted and trucks unable to keep up with demand for restocking, it became clear both Woolies’ and Coles’ online grocery portals were becoming logistically untenable.
So on Sunday Woolworths reached for a crucial circuit breaker and took the unprecedented step of shelving online delivery from its Victorian supermarkets as well as pausing click-and-collect from stores until further notice.
Coles on Monday put similar contingency measures in place, with both of the grocery giants’ online offerings having wobbled badly in terms of fulfilment early last week.
On Tuesday UBS belled the cat in terms of hoarding volumes with its 25 percent year-on-year increase estimate, a particularly awkward number that logically translates to significantly increased earnings for supermarkets.
On Wednesday morning Prime Minister Scott Morrison used a press conference to castigate Australia’s FOMO obsession and hoarding habit, demanding that people just “stop it”.
Confronted by stores with empty shelves, Woolworths Group CEO Brad Banducci on the same day imposed purchasing volume limits across Woolworths’ range with no re-opening of online sales in sight.
On the same day, Labor’s shadow minister for local government hopped into some councils not lifting truck delivery window restrictions to let supplies in.
Technology vs the people
For consumers raised on a steady diet of hyper convenience primarily enabled by online shopfronts and apps – Coles’ partnership with Uber Eats is emblematic here – the sight of empty shelves is naturally confronting.
A year ago, both Coles and Woolies were scrambling to deal with the meal home delivery phenomenon as dark kitchens sprang-up left and right to eat their share of the shopping basket.
Come dinnertime, the number of food delivery riders clogging inner metro roads became a staple of drive time radio complaints as food apps went all-out for market share.
That flipped with the virus landing in Australia as the limits of technology were exposed.
Until recently, it was the issue of technological performance and execution, especially online, that was the investor litmus test for supermarkets and retailers more broadly as commerce moved from bricks to clicks.
The issue that has now been exposed is that there’s a very physical mismatch around expectations of what technology can physically deliver. In a store you can see the shelves are empty. Online, you’re scrolling item by item.
How we got here: psychology and scale
In simple terms, the problem is as soon as the online doors open, the stampede begins with demand so aggressively outstripping finite online fulfilment capacity the channel becomes choked.
Anyone that’s ever sat through the lengthy investor analyst calls that accompany Woolworths’ and Coles’ annual and half yearly profit updates will have heard both grocers aggressively talk up their online sales that, until the last six months, have been profit margin dilutive.
Even then, additional profit margin over conventional in store sales is so skinny it isn’t material and is not disclosed.
In August 2019 Woolworths told investors online sales were worth around 4.2 percent of revenue at $2.5 billion, a hike of 32 percent over the previous year. 
That same reporting season, Coles bowled-up a 30 percent hike in online sales to $1.1 billion.
Click-and-collect has been the big winner in terms of improved profit margin, but no matter which way you look at it online is still a single figure fraction of overall store sales volume.
Given the UBS 25 percent year on year estimate of the scale of the surge, it’s clear there would be no way capacity could ever meet demand for delivery given the fact supermarkets were already trying to shift online shopping to collection in store.
So when consumers see pictures of physical shelves stripped bare, not to mention the legitimate fear of crowds, they hit the online channel with everything they have.
But there’s a kicker and it’s a big one. If Coles and Woolworths actually tried to deliver the kind of volumes online that customers were demanding, it would seriously strip urgently needed capacity out of its visibly strained store network, arguably fueling further panic and fear.
Industry sources say the figure the supermarkets are now citing is increased daily sales volume of 160 percent.
Emergency delivery
Online delivery may be suspended for Woolworths and Coles for the time being, but that probably won’t mean the trucks will remain idle for long.
Both Coles and Woolies’ delivery networks and fulfilment centres are a national distribution resource that could well yet play a vital role in the event of geographic population lockdowns – if they hit.
Controlled emergency distribution using the supermarket fridged truck fleet to areas with heavy restrictions is logical and likely already being wargamed, especially for elderly and vulnerable people who already used the online delivery services.
This scenario would also need some sort of web interface so that vulnerable people in need or those areas designated for isolation to order, but it would clearly need to have access restricted and authorised.
Both WooliesX and Coles have major web development and the agile skills to have such a service up and running quickly.
They may not be talking publicly about it, but the chances are they are working on just such a scenario right now.

Tempemail , Tempmail Temp email addressess (10 minutes emails)– When you want to create account on some forum or social media, like Facebook, Reddit, Twitter, TikTok you have to enter information about your e-mail box to get an activation link. Unfortunately, after registration, this social media sends you dozens of messages with useless information, which you are not interested in. To avoid that, visit this Temp mail generator: tempemail.co and you will have a Temp mail disposable address and end up on a bunch of spam lists. This email will expire after 10 minute so you can call this Temp mail 10 minute email. Our service is free! Let’s enjoy!

Woolworths and Coles face fresh trouble meeting online orders – Strategy – Software- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

Woolworths has stopped taking online orders for same-day pick-up and delivery while Coles is also having trouble fulfilling online orders as panic buying left some supermarkets short of certain “household staples”.
On Sunday afternoon, Woolworths said it had “temporarily paused” its fastest online order options, though it continued to take orders with longer lead-time deliveries.
“We have temporarily paused our online ‘Pick up’ and ‘Delivery Now’ services due to temporary shortages on a number of items and to allow our teams to focus on serving customers in-store,” it said.
“Refunds on any existing orders are currently being processed.
“We apologise for any inconvenience caused and thank you for your patience during this time.”
Delivery Now promises to deliver groceries within two hours to selected inner-city suburbs, while the pickup option allowed orders lodged before 1pm to be collected from a nearby supermarket the same day.
In both cases, the orders are fulfilled from shelf stock at the closest supermarket.
Woolworths customers reported on social media receiving text messages that read: “We are deeply sorry. We have made the difficult decision to cancel your online order as we are not able to supply the majority of products you have requested”.
Coles is suffering from similar problems. It has paused its version of Delivery Now, where it uses Uber Eats to make deliveries.
However, it did not appear to have paused other types of online orders.
Instead, Coles said it was fulfilling and dispatching orders as best it could, though that was likely to mean orders would be delivered incomplete.
“Coles Online and Click&Collect orders are picked and packed at our supermarkets the day you request delivery, so if the supermarket is out of stock of a particular product, we may unfortunately be unable to fulfil parts of your order,” it said on Sunday afternoon.
“You are not charged for items you order until we have picked and processed your groceries for delivery. 
“If a product you have requested is out of stock, you will be notified via email that it will not be included in your order and you will not be charged, so you do not need to call and request a refund.”
That approach appeared to be causing issues with some customers complaining of being delivered only a handful of items and a comparatively high fee for delivery.
Coles customers flooded its social media channels on Sunday saying they had been unable to complete online orders for several hours, or that they had lost existing delivery slots after checking on or modifying an existing order.
Supermarkets generally faced increased demand for certain food items and toiletries as Australia begins its response to the COVID-19 pandemic, leading to some temporary shelf shortages.
Both Woolworths and Coles faced a similar surge in online demand last week though managed to resurrect their services during the week.

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Woolworths, Coles online stores recovering after frenzied buying – Finance – Digital & Disruption – Cloud – Networking- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

Customers fretting over setting foot in high-traffic retail outlets like supermarkets are creating online and logistical headaches for Coles and Woolworths, with the nation’s biggest merchants buffeted by online buying surges that have stretched delivery networks.
Woolworths on Tuesday confirmed it was gradually restoring its “Delivery Now” service for online purchases in Sydney after it unexpectedly pulled the short time fulfilment service late last week.
The suspension came amid frenzied consumer purchasing behaviour across products ranging from toilet paper to tinned tuna and microwave rice fuelled by uncertainty around the extent of Covid19 infections in Australia’s cities.
“Delivery Now was temporarily suspended in Sydney from Wednesday to Sunday,” a Woolworths spokesperson told iTnews.
“We opened up Delivery Now orders from eight Sydney stores on Monday. We plan to have all 32 stores up and running again by the end of the week.”
Coles is understood to have been hit with a similar surge, with reports saying it has been directing online customers to click-and-collect facilities rather than home deliveries for online purchases.
And while the sudden surge in online orders might look like a big bonus for the retailers, the reality is that both the major supermarket brands have only just made online sales profit margin accretive, with click-and-collect the gamechanger.
What’s less clear is whether the limitations around online delivery have propelled consumer anxieties over the availability of some goods as retailers impose purchasing limits on items like toilet paper to rein-in the run on stock.
Woolies says it is doing its best.
“Like our supermarkets, our online teams have been working hard to manage higher than usual demand for deliveries over the past week,” a Woolworths spokesperson said.
“Delivery windows have been filling up faster than usual and we apologise to customers for the inconvenience this has caused.
“We’ve been ramping up our delivery capacity with the support of our transport partners and doing all we can to fulfil orders for our customers as quickly as possible.”
Comment has been sought from Coles.

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Woolworths uses AI to recognise fruit and veg purchases – Hardware – Software- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

Tiliter scales in-store at Woolworths. (Credit: Tiliter)

Woolworths is running trials of AI-enabled scales at three inner-city Sydney stores that can automatically recognise the type of fruit or vegetable being weighed.
The scales are made by Sydney-based startup Tiliter and are now on trial at Woolworths’ Pitt Street Metro, Metcentre Metro and MetroGo Strawberry Hills stores.
A demonstration of the machine shows a piece of stone fruit being placed on the scales and recognised as either a nectarine or peach.
The customer is then able to select the correct item on the display.
It is intended initially that the scales are used by Scan&Go customers – that is, customers using smartphones to scan and pay for items at selected Woolworths stores.
Scan&Go was launched in September 2018 and is now offered at 10 stores across Sydney.
It allows customers to scan products with their smartphone as they walk through the store and pay in the app before tapping off at a kiosk in the self-serve area of the supermarket.
Presently, for loose produce, customers must scan the produce’s barcode on the shelf, then put the item on the scales, and scan an additional barcode that records the weight.
The Tiliter technology means customers place their produce on the scale and it displays a single barcode that the customer scans with their phone.
“While the feedback on our Scan&Go app has been really pleasing, we’re constantly looking for ways to improve the customer experience,” Woolworths’ general manager of digital and payments Paul Monnington told iTnews.
“We know the two-step scanning process with loose fruit and veg isn’t quite as seamless as scanning pre-packed goods on the app.
“Together with Tiliter, we’re trialling AI-enabled product recognition scales in a few of our Metro stores to see if we can speed the shopping experience up even further.
“We’ll keep a close eye on customer feedback and scan accuracy before determining our next steps with the technology.”

Scales that used machine vision to automatically recognise fruit and vegetable purchases were flagged as an area of interest by Woolworths back in mid-2018.
As iTnews reported at the time, Woolworths’ had high ambitions for the technology, potentially applying it across its entire fleet of self-service checkouts.
Instead of requiring customers to slow down to manually search for items and then select the quantity, Woolworths had been hoping this could be automated in future.

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