This AI-based system can teach human intention to robots- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

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In a bid to give machines the ability to predict intent when interacting with humans, a team at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) Sydney is developing artificial intelligence-driven prototype human-machine interface system that will assist humans to be seen not merely as tools, but as partners.
Dr Lina Yao, a senior lecturer of engineering at UNSW and principal investigator, is busy getting AI systems and human-machine interfaces up to speed with the finer nuances of human behaviour.
The ultimate goal is for her research to be used in autonomous AI systems, robots and even cyborgs, but the first step is focused on the interface between humans and intelligent machines.
“What we’re doing in these early phases is to help machines learn to act like humans based on our daily interactions and the actions that are influenced by our own judgment and expectations – so that they can be better placed to predict our intentions,” Yao said in a university statement.
At the moment, AI may do a plausible job at detecting the intent of another person (in other words, after the fact).
It may even have a list of predefined, possible responses that a human will respond within a given situation. But when an AI system or machine only has a few clues or partial observations to go on, its responses can sometimes be a little robotic.
Dr Yao is working on less obvious examples of human behaviour integrated into AI systems to improve intent prediction.
Things like gestures, eye movement, posture, facial expression and even micro-expressions – the tell-tale physical signs when someone reacts emotionally to a stimulus but tries to keep it hidden.
“We can learn and predict what a human would like to do when they’re wearing an EEG [electroencephalogram] device,” said Yao.
While wearing one of these devices, whenever the person makes a movement, their brainwaves are collected which researchers can then analyse.
“Later we can ask people to think about moving with a particular action – such as raising their right arm. So not actually raising the arm, but thinking about it, and we can then collect the associated brain waves,” said Yao.
Recording this data has the potential to help people unable to move or communicate freely due to disability or illness.
Brain waves recorded with an EEG device could be analysed and used to move machinery such as a wheelchair, or even to communicate a request for assistance.
According to Yao, autonomous AI systems and machines may one day look at us as belonging to one of three categories after observing our behavior — peer, bystander or competitor.
“While this may seem cold and aloof, these categories may dynamically change from one to another according to their evolving contexts.
At any rate, she said, this sort of cognitive categorisation is actually very human.

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What Pokémon can teach us about storytelling | Games – Blog – 10 minute

“This is it? This is the game?”
I am in Italy with my partner, and just like every beach holiday since 1999, I have booted up Pokémon. This particular version is Pokémon Sun for the Nintendo 3DS, but all the games are fundamentally the same: you’re a child leaving home to catch and train tiny monsters so you can defeat various bosses and bad guys. My boyfriend, who has never played Pokémon, has just watched me eviscerate a grunt trainer with my level 41 Mudsdale.
“It’s so … slow.”
I consider, for the first time, what the Pokémon games look like to a person who has never played them. They are slow. A huge portion is just you, a 10-year-old, walking around and being assaulted by bats. The “battles” you enter with other trainers are fundamentally lacking in drama, and mostly consist of you smashing the same one or two moves over and over again. And the “moves”? You see very little of them. Rattata uses “tackle” and this is signified by a rat animation inclining slightly forward.
Why have I been playing this game for 20 years? Because there are two different but adjoining games going on in Pokémon. There is one you play on your console, the plodding, multiple choice-based, “gotta catch ’em all” game that birthed an anime dynasty, then there is another that happens entirely in your own head.
If you’ve ever played Pokémon, you know exactly what I’m talking about. The guilt you feel when it’s time to bench your Pidgeot – the one who started with you as a humble level 4 Pidgey on Route 1 – because you know he can’t take you to the dizzy heights of the Indigo Plateau. The overwhelming sense of gulping-for-air urgency when you and your team emerge, limping and faint, from another endless cave of poisonous Zubats and aggressive trainers. The strange existential panic when you use a thunder stone on your dainty Pikachu, so he may evolve into a hefty daddy Raichu.
The game encourages you to evolve your Pokémon, bench the weak ones, and do whatever you can to succeed. The weirdly intense emotional state this summons is not a result of the slow gameplay mechanics but a cumulative effect of the writing. The games are essentially road movies. You journey through different towns, dropping in on lives already in progress, stories already in motion. And like any road movie, the visitor is only ever told as much as he needs to know. There are no Super Mario-style “Find the princess!” prompts. You are asked, simply, to read the room.
One visceral example of this is Lavender Town, which you experience as a vague, unfinished ghost story. You arrive in this small village. Something is obviously wrong. Nothing is growing, there are no water features, and a shrill, repetitive 8-bit tune plays. You learn that this is the home of the only Pokémon graveyard. It is the first time we are introduced to the concept of death. We know Pokémon “faint” if they lose a battle, but healthcare being free and medication cheap, death is not something we’ve had to confront yet. But now we know: Pokémon die and they are mourned.
That’s not all. Something terrible has happened here, and recently. One of the characters explains: “Ghosts appeared in Pokémon Tower. I think they’re the spirits of Pokémon that the Rockets killed.” So Lavender Town is haunted because of a massacre led by Team Rocket, something we hear nothing more about.

Mysterious massacre … Team Rocket from Pokemon the Movie: The Power of Us
The Pokémon games are full of stories like this: half-written, euphemistic, full of hints and easter eggs, and characters who allude to things that often never happen. For the first few hours of Pokémon Blue and Red, you are led to believe that a big plot with a Clefairy is about to kick off, and it simply never does. It creates a sense that you are living in a vast, complex world full of lost tales and broken people.
Take the gym leaders. These are the game’s grimy local politicians, whose moods and preferences govern an entire region. The more you play, the more you read into their sad little lives. Brock’s backwoods gym is so dull you can practically hear your rubber soles squeaking on the floor as you destroy his Onix. At Lt. Surge’s deranged Electric-type gym you’re forced to sort through trash before he’ll even speak to you. Female-led gyms tend to be more elaborate – do they have to work harder to gain credibility? Is there inherent sexism in the gym leadership world? Maybe that’s why Erica has more trainers than anyone else. Maybe it’s a feminist thing. Maybe Erica is the AOC of Pokémon.
From the beginning, Pokémon has encouraged this kind of close reading. Satoshi Tajiri, the president of Game Freak and creator of the franchise, began his career as a writer. He made a video arcade fanzine, also called Game Freak, which became hugely popular for its gamer tips and lists of easter eggs. In 1999, he gave an interview to Time magazine about the mysterious and elusive Pokémon named Mew, which was added to Pokémon Red and Blue at the last moment as a hidden extra. “There were 150 characters, and Mew was number 151,” Tajiri explained. “It created a myth about the game, that there was an invisible character out there … It kept the interest alive.”
For decades, fan theories about how to find Mew circulated through forums. Most speculation centred on a small truck parked near a ship named SS Anne at Vermilion Harbour. The truck is only accessible with the aid of some crafty trading with another player; for years, many players believed that Mew was hidden behind that elusive vehicle.
The sparse storytelling has led to players filling in the gaps in other creative and fascinating ways. The world is mostly populated by children and elderly guardians, and your own father is absent. Lieutenant Surge, an Electric gym leader, alludes to combat, and is one of the few middle-aged men in the game. To many fans, the natural conclusion is that we are living a decade or so after a war so devastating that it claimed an entire generation of men. Suddenly, the lush forests, the free healthcare (didn’t the NHS begin after the second world war, after all?), the societal emphasis on having strong Pokémon who are willing to fight for you – it all makes sense.
As a novelist, I’m keenly aware that people won’t commit to a story unless it engenders an ideological pact between writer and audience; it has to encourage us to fill in the gaps and overinvest emotionally. I would feel ashamed to undertake such a close reading of the Pokémon games, if I weren’t absolutely sure that these theories live in the hearts and minds of millions of fans who spent their childhoods starting adventure after adventure, each more or less identical and yet all filled with imagination. These fans are easy to find. All you need to do is whisper the magic words: “I like shorts. They’re comfy and easy to wear.” Trust me, they’ll understand.

Caroline O’Donoghue’s second novel, Scenes of a Graphic Nature, will be published by Virago in June.

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Joe Biden calls game developers “little creeps” who make titles that “teach you how to kill” – Blog – 10 minute

A hot potato: Politicians rarely have anything good to say about video games, and former US vice president Joe Biden is particularly unimpressed by the industry, calling developers he met at the White House “creeps” and “arrogant” who make games that teach people how to kill.
Biden, who is currently campaigning to become the Democratic nomination for the 2020 presidential election, shared his opinions in an interview with the New York Times. When asked about Silicon Valley’s expansion of power during his time in the Obama administration, Biden said: “And you may recall, the criticism I got for meeting with the leaders in Silicon Valley, when I was trying to work out an agreement dealing with them protecting intellectual property for artists in the United States of America. And at one point, one of the little creeps sitting around that table, who was a multi- — close to a billionaire — who told me he was an artist because he was able to come up with games to teach you how to kill people.”
As for which game executive Biden was referring to as a creep, Kotaku has some theories about who the person might be, including EA’s then-CEO John Riccitiello.
“And then one of these righteous people said to me that, you know, ‘We are the economic engine of America. We are the ones.’ And fortunately I had done a little homework before I went and I said, you know, I find it fascinating,” Biden continued. “As I added up the seven outfits, everyone’s there but Microsoft. I said, you have fewer people on your payroll than all the losses that General Motors just faced in the last quarter, of employees. So don’t lecture me about how you’ve created all this employment.. The point is, there’s an arrogance about it, an overwhelming arrogance that we are, we are the ones. We can do what we want to do. I disagree.”
Biden has expressed his distaste for video games in the past. During 2013, while he was vice president, he proposed an additional tax on violent media, including violent game.

Despite numerous studies showing no link between violent video games and real-life violent crimes, we’ve seen several politicians suggesting extra taxes be added to the titles. The White House famously used a video to illustrate violence in games back in 2018, which are often blamed following mass shootings.

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A marketing masterclass: What Glastonbury can teach us- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

Marketing is about making a noise, so it’s perhaps fitting that a grand old music festival can teach us all a few lessons about how to get heard in the hotly-competitive digital ecosystem.
Recently, music legend Paul McCartney showed he was as in tune with social media as the sounds of the swinging Sixties. His post to announce he will headline next year’s 50th anniversary Somerset showpiece was fun and shareable content apt for a world that demands a little more than a typed statement.
He tweeted three pictures – composer Philip Glass, actor Emma Stone and musician Chuck Berry. The tweet was a cryptic code: together, their surnames are ‘Glass-Stone-Berry’.
It was much more than a fun reveal, though – this genius move secured a wave of user-generated content and press coverage.

pic.twitter.com/ATdjMoiehi
— Paul McCartney (@PaulMcCartney) November 18, 2019

Yet, it isn’t just the Fab Four frontman who can show the marketing world a few tricks. Glastonbury is a fascinating case study on the power and value of experiential marketing.
What Glastonbury teaches us about experiential content marketing
Known as “the greatest show on earth” to many, Glastonbury is the world’s largest greenfield festival. 2017 saw the contemporary arts weekender broadcast to more than 21 million people.
The music event has come a long way from humble roots as a 1970s hippie gathering. In fact, the entire festival industry is booming – it’s worth £2.28 billion across the world and shows no sign of slowing.
So, what’s behind this trend? Why are consumers spending so much on live music in the Spotify and Apple Music era?
The answer lies in the experience – and in growing access to media that brings this experience closer than ever before. If Glastonbury boomed when Channel 4 first exposed a muddy paradise to the world in 1994, then the platforms like Instagram sell a new, glitter-covered version of the festival experience to the masses.
This is a vital lesson for marketers: unique experiences and the fear of missing out (FOMO) can drive big bucks your way. When choosing a strategy, more and more brand giants are choosing to centre their digital campaigns on something experiential.
What is experiential marketing?
The purpose of experiential marketing is to bring brands to life. The idea is that, by actively engaging consumers, we can bridge the gap between logos, products and real people.
An activation is needed to create the effect – this might be an event, a stunt or an immersive experience. The point is to get right to the heart of what motivates and compels your target audience.
This can be at the heart of a marketing campaign and fuel blogs, social posts, billboards, TV ads – any and every piece of content you can imagine. It gives you a spark.
How does Glastonbury use experiential marketing?
Glastonbury uses its own style of experiential marketing to cultivate mystery. The organisers leave slots blank, start rumours and find creative ways to make announcements.
The 2019 saw secret forest gigs and each year, there are rumours of an underground piano bar popping up in new locations. These stunts provide the perfect model for brand experiences. Exclusivity is exciting, after all – and social media allows brands to drop live hints like never before.
Ingenious stunt tactics were used to announce the first 2019 headliner: two simple posters appeared in Oxfam charity shops.
The result? A swarm of user-generated content and a clever stunt that managed to marry the festival’s ethical brand with a rising genre: grime. There was no anti-rap petition; the press coverage struck exactly the right tone.
How are brands using experiential marketing?
Red Bull’s Stratos campaign changed the pace of experiential marketing back in 2012. Pouring one tenth of its global marketing budget into the high-speed project, the company sought to break the world record for the fastest freefall. It came 65 years after Chuck Yeager first broke the sound barrier – more than just a campaign, this project was a historical moment.
It was broadcast in more than 50 countries but the live webcast was the real star of the show. Powered by 280 digital partners, this seamless video content attracted 52 million views. Best of all, the Red Bull logo was in every shot.
When sales rose by a huge seven per cent in the following six months, other brands couldn’t help but to sit up and take notice.
Three types of experiential marketing are now being deployed:
1. Guerilla stunts
Guerilla stunts seek to surprise consumers with unorthodox images or experiences. Some of the earliest examples involved letting guerillas loose in New York bars to mention alcohol brand names. More recently, Jeep marked out parking spaces in unconventional locations to showcase the off-road capabilities of its cars.
Today, viral videos are just as important as street stunts. The two often go hand-in-hand, allowing relatively low-cost stunts to achieve stratospheric reach. The trick to pulling off guerilla marketing in the digital age is to make events clever and interactive. A great example is the spy experience created by Coca Cola and the James Bond franchise. Vending machine users found themselves caught in a real life 007 experience that generated a buzz online.
2. Installations
Pop-up stalls are great for high-traffic areas like conferences or music festivals. Guitar Hero rocked several festivals in 2015 and Benefit’s ‘Glastonbrow’ pop-up drive thru even managed to basque in the glory of Glastonbury from the A37 and without an official invite.
The trick is to offer attendees something they want: pampering, services or entertainment. The more memorable, the better.
A new, smarter breed of installation is going digital, however. Motivating your audience to create user-generated content – like photos – amplifies the benefit. For an easy bonus, provide users with exclusive access to supporting content so they have a reason to visit your site.
3. Immersive technologies
Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality offer huge opportunities for brands, since they can transport users into unique experience from any location. Volvo has invited people to test drive cars and The North Face has taken participants on virtual hikes through Yosemite and Nepal.
These technologies have become a staple at industry events. The next step is likely to see users connecting with brands from inside their homes, using VR to try on clothing or view products from all angles.
As this bright future rolls out, brands should remember the Glastonbury formula: quality, mystery and exclusivity. The New York Times has sent VR glasses to reward its most loyal subscribers, while the Stranger Things AR World Lens partnered with Snapchat to create a quality experience filled with surprises – but only for select superfans.
Content marketing is about curating the digital experience
So far, experiential marketing has been dominated by larger brands wishing to enhance brand reputation rather than to build its presence. But, 2019 has seen investment from every sector and the principles are easily transported to any business blog.
Brand storytelling is one way to keep your readers entertained. From travel to interior design and human interest stories, there are some topics people love to engage with – so find those that relate to your brand. Use written content, video and podcasts to bring them to life.
Building infographics and quizzes is another smart way to entertain your personas by taking them on a digital journey. Highly shareable and interactive link bait campaigns are guerrilla experiences of the future.
Lessons for marketers
The tides are turning as all marketing makes the transition to digital. This should act as a reminder for marketers in both camps: ignoring digital opportunities is a terrible mistake, but no algorithm in the world can replace the value of great experiences.
In your next ideation session, think about how to create your own Glastonbury moment to build excitement – relative to your business, of course. After all, if a 77-year-old music legend can use social media to captivate a new generation, perhaps we can all step up our game.
Kelly Barnett, content editor at Zazzle Media.

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