The murky plight of social media regulation- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

Last week, Ofcom announced that it would be granted new powers to regulate advertising on social media. Considering the first Facebook ad went out in 2005, this has been a very long time coming.
The government is planning to set the directions of the regulations and will allow Ofcom to adapt and draw up the details. For this to work smoothly, there will need to be a lot of deeper understanding of the nuances of the platforms, as well as smooth collaboration between all parties involved.
Before this ruling was announced, platforms were tasked with self-policing the organic and paid content they hosted. In fact, reportedly Facebook wasn’t too strict with policing ads in the earlier days.
Kevin Colleran, one of Facebook’s first advertising salespersons said: “I do not remember any kind of review process in the early days (other than standard content, grammar, etc). Later on, when the ads did start being placed closer to the content of the page (rather than on the sides where the banners/flyers were placed) there may have been more strict policies put into place in an effort to protect the user experience.”
Platforms have also been relying on its users to flag and report comments and content that go against the murky community guidelines they’d each set up for themselves. Putting the brunt on the content creators and content consumers rather than on the platforms themselves, seems illogical.
With this approach, platforms take a backseat approach to regulation. This has meant that many advertisers got away with a lot until it was flagged or deemed to be against the guidelines. In theory, these new regulations should help to set a homogenous set of rules for all platforms to comply with. As such, social media advertisers will be forced to be more responsible, as there will be more consistency and transparency across all platforms as to what they should and shouldn’t do and there will be more chance of a penalty if their content violates these policies.
Regulations like Ofcom’s force platforms to be more compliant and wake up to effects they’re having on users. Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg has been in Germany this week attending a security conference where he’s been speaking about his approach to regulation against “harmful” content on Facebook. He argues that it’s important to treat social media platforms differently from newspapers and existing media, but not to the extent that these platforms take a removed approach where the data is simply hosted without them taking any responsibility.
Zuckerberg’s middle-ground approach sounds like a good idea on paper but again, there are questions to be asked. He’s said he’d like to balance “promoting innovation and research” with users’ privacy and security online. This grey area allows platforms like Facebook to set and interpret their own regulations around how privacy is handled. As is custom with middle-ground approaches like these though, there’s going to be a teething period. This is something that Ofcom will need to keep in mind when regulating social platforms’ content.
While this teething period may take time, it’s definitely a welcome change that these regulations around social advertising aren’t just being explored, but are on the road to being enforced. This will only mean that content creators and brands are going to be forced to be more mindful of the content they’re putting out and the negative impacts this content could have.
Zahra Hasan, strategist, Wilderness

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Social Commerce expected to hit $70 Billion Mark- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

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Social commerce has been a hot topic in the media in 2019, with big names investing in social commerce startups and new-age social media platforms like Sharechat, TikTok and others showing interest in this sector. Wizikey, has collated interesting trends across this industry and released a report on the top social commerce startups using its AI and ML-based technology. The top 5 newsmakers were identified in the category and analysed based on the volume of news made by each of them.
According to the report, while e-commerce too has benefited from the increasing internet penetration, social commerce emerged as a relatively new concept, it already accounts for 15-20% of the online retail market and is expected to hit the $70 billion mark in the coming 10 years. In India, most of the people living in Tier 2 and Tier 3 cities shop through Facebook and WhatsApp. While there is still some time before social commerce can make inroads into the metro cities, the majority of the population is already buying all sorts of products through networking sites. China is one geography that has welcomed social commerce with open arms. The way WeChat is being used to interact, explore, buy and sell, is phenomenal. The industry is growing at almost twice the rate of the overall online retail industry*.
E-commerce giants have seen the signs and are working towards a social commerce model. Amazon has already launched an affiliate program. It is safe to say that social media will act as a catalyst for the new billion-dollar market and social commerce is on track to be the next revolution in the online retail industry.
Anshul Sushil, Founder and CEO of Wizikey said, “Indian consumers are used to a various set of shopping experiences, one of which is social and highly interactive shopping; giving birth to Social commerce- a new billion-dollar market. We at Wizikey study different sectors and social commerce has emerged as a new category with different players coming into play with interesting news trends. This industry has the potential to disrupt and is on track to be the next revolution in the online retail industry.”
Akarsh Srivastava, Vice President at SAIF Partners shared his insights on the Social Commerce industry which is growing at a rapid pace in India. He added “Incumbent platforms like Amazon, Flipkart etc have demonstrated that a large e-commerce business can be built in India. However, these platforms (and others like Big Basket, Grofers etc) were built keeping in mind the earliest internet adopters. Most of these apps started and scaled before the Jio phenomenon. Current online models rely on digital acquisition through Facebook, Google and end up competing with other commerce services trying to target the same user with sops like discounts. Social commerce aims to leverage the social behaviour of these users to facilitate transactions.
He further added “The size of opportunity can be gauged by the fact that Whatsapp has 400 million monthly active users, while the number of annual online shoppers is only about 100 million. Amazon and Flipkart have close to 80 million users each opening their apps (all of them not necessarily transacting) monthly and annual GMVs of ~$10-12 Bn. A platform which bridges this divide can create a much larger business than any of the incumbents.”
Top Players in Social Commerce
In recent years the industry has seen an exponential increase in the number of players as well as the funding flowing into these companies. The top companies that have emerged as industry leaders in India are:
Meesho, a four-year-old startup, can be regarded as the pioneer of social commerce in India. With a network of more than two million resellers, Meesho paved the way for other players to enter the market. Dealing largely in electronics, home products, and clothing, the platform helps customers in smaller cities connect with small businesses and entrepreneurs through platforms like Facebook, WhatsApp, and Instagram.
DealShare is another social commerce platform that operates on a slightly different model than other players like Meesho. The startup focuses on group buying for groceries and other home products in the lower and middle-income segments. DealShare received the maximum coverage in the media for their funding announcement.
Poshmark is a social commerce marketplace with a model that is quite different from others covered in the report. While Meesho and DealShare connect sellers and buyers through existing social networks like Facebook and WhatsApp, Poshmark has created its own networking platform where sellers can share their products with their followers and sell from the Poshmark app itself.
Mall91, like Poshmark, has its own platform which integrates various features such as video chat, messenger and social shopping into one single app. Mall91 also operates in vernacular languages to ensure a more widespread inclusion of non-metro city users.
GlowRoad is a women-focused reselling platform that enables its users to create their own networks and buy and sell through them. The startup mainly services housewives, enabling them to sell products from the comfort of their homes through offline and online modes.
WMall is a women-focused social community-based e-commerce platform that targets new-to-internet women users. It allows users to create and upload video content to help others in making better buying decisions and build trust with sellers on the platform.

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Caroline Flack’s death shows how social media has democratised cruelty | Richard Seymour | Opinion- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

The days after the death of Caroline Flack have seen an admirably sober, reflective mood on the part of politicians and the public. Labour leadership candidates are denouncing press intrusion and calling for regulation of social media, while Downing Street wants social media firms to be more proactive in removing “unacceptable content”. Journalists are contrite over allegations that the tabloids hounded Flack. After the feast, the penitence.
Amid the contrition, of course, everyone is searching for someone else to blame. Social media users blame trolls. Politicians blame social media. The press blames reality television – a format that specialises in “interpersonal torture”, as Douglas Rushkoff puts it.
But this problem can’t be reduced to a single source, and Flack’s trials in particular seem to have been orchestrated by an informal alliance between the press, social media, and police and prosecutors – who furnish the titillating details for lurid headlines and furious tweets. But there is no single villain in this coalition of moral persecution: in fact, it involves us all.

The thrill of the chase is accompanied by the thrill of realising that we are all at risk, all potential targets

Flack was about to be prosecuted over allegations of assaulting her partner, despite him withdrawing his complaint. Most of us know next to nothing about what really happened. However, the press that had happily built her up as a star also delighted in taking her down, cackling about Caroline “Whack”. On the back of these headlines, armies of online vigilantes were equally happy to harass someone about whom they knew little, often acting as judge, jury and executioner while dispensing with the presumption of innocence. What is really happening here is that a form of punitive moralism towards celebrities, long associated with the tabloid press and the police – whose alliance was exposed by the phone-hacking scandal – has now been democratised. The issue is not unkindness or random bad behaviour, but a cultural system of public sadism.
This is obscured by the fact that such sadism usually has some virtuous justification. The former director of public prosecutions Ken Macdonald has offered the state’s rationale for prosecuting Flack after the allegations were withdrawn, rightly noting that victims often withdraw their complaints under pressure from their abusers. The tabloids, meanwhile, have their own justifications for exposing private lives. “Privacy is for paedos,” the News of the World hack Paul McMullan told the Leveson inquiry.In all his years of spying on celebrities for public titillation, he had “never found anybody doing any good”.
Online culture has its own forms of justification for vigilantism. The hashtag #believesurvivors, for example, has often been interpreted on social media to mean that every horrendous allegation is automatically true. There are good reasons for all of this: abusers exert pressure on their victims; the criminal justice system is under increasing public pressure to rectify its mishandling of such crimes; privacy can be used to shield bad behaviour; and survivors are all too often not taken seriously. Yet we have already seen examples – including the collapse of Operation Midland and related inquiries into elite child abuse – of how public shaming, online and off, can be used to destroy people’s lives, even if the charges turn out to be baseless. But the dirty secret in all these episodes is the pleasure we all take in participating.
What is at stake in the monstering of celebrities is a prurient relish in the excesses and meltdowns of cultural elites – a form of what Theodor Adorno called “malicious egalitarianism”. If you’re in the public eye, it is said, nastiness goes with the terrain. It is the quid pro quo for privilege. Many people online now argue that the consequences of such attacks usually aren’t even serious. “Just about everybody ends up fine,” the columnist Lyta Gold writes, regarding “cancel culture” with “their careers intact”. Yet this is a standard of “harm” that says it doesn’t matter what torment a person endures – if they’re not dead, or in career oblivion, then they’re basically fine.
But now it is not just the ostensibly powerful who are in our sights. The upshot of social media is that we’re all in the public eye, all celebrities. An entire industry has developed – call it the social industry – which converts social life into celebrity competition. The social media platforms, along with a network of advertisers, PR firms, multinationals, celebrities, news media and gaming corporations connected to them, have helped create a highly profitable new ecology of public visibility.
Anyone with an account has a public image – and, by deciding what to post, a public relations strategy. Anyone can become a magnet for the volatile feelings associated with what psychiatrists call “celebrity worship syndrome”, which burden the sufferer with anxiety and depression. Over time, especially as the follower is disappointed by the object of their worship, these feelings segue into a no less passionate loathing, or even a desire to destroy the celebrity.
The social industry did not invent these tendencies. Even McMullan admitted that his paper’s articles about Jennifer Elliott, daughter of the actor Denholm Elliott, may have contributed to her suicide. Richard Littlejohn’s hounding of the trans woman Lucy Meadows in the Daily Mail contributed, according to the coroner, to her suicide. However, the social industry has democratised cruelty, ramped up popular sadism and enrolled all of us into these rituals of punishment.

Most ingeniously, the industry sells us a myth of celebrity while leveraging the reality that celebrity makes people miserable. The benders and breakdowns of celebrities, their horrified distress signals as their lives are taken over by their public persona, are well known. Less well known is that the rate of suicide for celebrities is anything between seven and several thousand times higher than that for the wider population. And now their breakdowns have become riveting social media spectacles, with celebrities often driven over the edge by supposedly outraged followers.
Yet if all of us are now celebrities – or at least all of us on social media – then that cruelty is also masochism. The thrill of the chase is accompanied by the thrill of realising that we are all at risk, all potential targets. Today’s bloodhound is tomorrow’s fox. So the more we extol the virtues we find wanting in others as we take them down on spurious grounds, from Natalie Wynn to Jameela Jamil, the more we are gleefully setting ourselves up for the same fall.
This is why the ritual calls for kindness that follow tragedies like Flack’s suicide are ineffectual, and as hollow as new year pledges of sobriety and clean living. To take kindness seriously, we need to confront not only the machinery that loops us into sadomasochistic frenzies for the purposes of generating profitable flows of attention and engagement. We also need to take seriously our own pleasure in, and fascination with, personal destruction.
• Richard Seymour is a political activist and author. His latest book is The Twittering Machine

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Bloomberg debate video sparks new concern over social media disinformation | US news- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

A heavily edited video of Mike Bloomberg’s performance at Wednesday’s democratic debate in Nevada has prompted fresh questions about disinformation policies on social media platforms.
The video posted by the Bloomberg campaign to Instagram on Thursday paints a flattering portrait of the former New York mayor’s widely panned debate performance, showing Bloomberg’s Democratic rivals responding with an extended silence after Bloomberg says he is the “only one here, I think, that’s ever started a business”. While the former New York mayor did make that statement at the debate, the response was edited to make it look as though the other candidates had no response.

A spokesman from Twitter told the Guardian that the Bloomberg post would probably fall under a new policy that will place warning labels next to significantly altered content starting on 5 March. The feature will show a warning to people before they like or retweet a post that Twitter has determined to be manipulated. The company will also reduce the visibility of misleading tweets and provide additional explanations with them.
The video does not, however, violate Facebook “manipulated media” policies and will stay on Instagram, which Facebook owns. A spokesman, Andy Stone, tweeted on Thursday that “this video does not violate our manipulated media policy”.
Facebook’s policy prohibits content that has been edited in ways that are “not apparent to the average person” and would lead viewers into believing someone in the video said words they did not actually say. It also bans videos that are “the product of artificial intelligence or machine learning that merges, replaces, or superimposes content into a video in a manner that makes it appear authentic”.
The Bloomberg video raised questions reminiscent of those that followed the controversy over a video of House speaker Nancy Pelosi, which was edited to appear as though she had ripped up a speech by Donald Trump while he was honoring a Tuskegee airman and other attendees. In that case, Facebook and Twitter rejected Pelosi’s request to remove the video.
These cases again raise questions about what content should be taken down and who should make those decisions, said Claire Wardle, the co-founder of the Harvard not-for-profit group First Draft, which researches misinformation.
“As we’ve been saying for a long time, it becomes very dangerous to think about taking down this type of content, as the internet and television have been and continue to be full of this type of political content globally,” Wardle said. “If you take this down, you have to take down a lot of content, and the lines are going to be incredibly blurred.”

The video was not meant to be viewed as real, said Galia Slayen, press secretary for Bloomberg’s campaign. “It’s tongue-in-cheek,” she said. “There were obviously no crickets on the debate stage.”
Facebook also responded on Thursday to questions surrounding Bloomberg’s “deputy digital organizing” team, which pays $2,500 per month to campaigners responsible for promoting Bloomberg to their friends via text and on social media.
Nathaniel Gleicher, the head of security policy at Facebook, said via Twitter that this would not constitute coordinated inauthentic behavior, which he said was defined in its community standards as an effort that has “a central reliance on a network of fake accounts”.
“Based on the descriptions, that doesn’t sound like what’s happening here,” the tweet said. He added that social media companies needed “clearer guidance from regulators” as political efforts create a gray area in terms of what qualifies as an organized attack.

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Dazn unites OTT, social & VOD football deals to ‘rival’ club and league offerings- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

Dazn Media has united the group’s football media assets for the first time, meaning that advertisers can make a splash around major football events across OTT, social and VOD.
This centralised sponsorship package, it claims, can reach as much 400 million fans across Goal, sponsorship of VOD on Dazn and Goal’s YouTube channels, and the Dazn Player video network which also sits on third-party sites like Mail Online, MSN and Kicker.de.
Dazn Media’s increasingly courting advertisers across its vast sports empire, increasingly it is positioning as a creative solution with an understanding of social football fandoms to these brands entering its ecosystem. Since its 2018 restructure from Perform Group, it has been looking to unify these products into a single point of purchase.
Kim Parker, vice president of activation at Dazn Media, told Tempemail that it has taken some time to unite the products.
“One of the key strengths is our ability to reach a mass audience through our global platforms, but with fan-targeted capabilities.” Most recently, this was bolstered with the growth of the Dazn OTT service’s ad product. “We can reach fans at every stage of their content journey, including pre, during and post-event.”
Brands like New Balance, Nissan and Santander helped inform the group’s development of its global football package, “it is an attractive proposition and delivers greater value for brands”.
Dazn is positioning the product as an alternative to traditional club or league sponsorships that “are not always available or may not necessarily represent the best value”. We’ve seen recently that Chelsea FC is opening up to shorter-term deals, showing that space at the top teams could be freed up in the coming years without clashing with long-term partners.
Parker is on the hunt for brands keen to align with premium football. He anticipates more spend from food delivery, electric cars, FX Trading and the tech unicorns in the coming years.
“We’re also seeing brands from key growth markets investing more heavily in football, as well as the more traditional brands, who could either see this as a platform to activate their current sponsorships or as an alternative to their sponsorship.”
“With the introduction of advertising on Dazn, we’ve seen brands such as Volkswagen are advertising on Dazn in multiple markets and now we can now combine all of our media assets to provide more flexible, creative and contextual ways of integrating a brand into our global media network.”
Currently, this package focused only on football but boxing, tennis, and motorsports are next on the slate. Parker concluded: “We are constantly looking to work with brands in more integrated and creative ways.”
Stefano D’Anna, executive vice president of media at Dazn Group said: “We feel this is a step-change in how brands can align with premium football and target fans. It’s a package that will rival any mainstream football sponsorship.
“Football content consumption is fragmenting and reaching modern digital audiences is getting harder and harder. By aggregating our assets, we can offer a brand the best global football with localised relevance. All underpinned by digital targeting, delivery and reporting that ensures accountability and limits wastage.”
In select markets, Dazn’s rights include more than 95 leagues and competitions, including the Premier League, Uefa Champions League, FA Cup, La Liga, Serie A, Ligue 1, Copa del Rey, and more.

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I’m a TV presenter who’s been pilloried on social media. I know the damage it can do | Kirstie Allsopp | Opinion- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

This is not a piece about Caroline Flack, partly because I never met her and I don’t watch Love Island, though I do know that she was a sister and a twin, and the idea of losing one of my sisters, or trying to explain their death to my children, chills my blood. I have immense sympathy for her friends, family and colleagues.
My reason for wading in is that I know a little about what it is like to be on television for a long time and to have done that during the dawn of social media, news websites and the sunset of TV. These are dangerous times. Television as we know it is dying, and it is dancing its last dance with its killer. Commissioners are as obsessed with clicks as they are in that other stricken industry, newspapers. “Noisy TV” is all the rage: it’s about the hashtag these days, a show is a success not if people watch it but if people chat about it online.
It means those who appear on TV are exposed to a level of comment and criticism that wasn’t there 20 years ago when I first found myself on screen. The first time I appeared on Question Time I went home happily oblivious to what anyone beyond my friends and family thought about my appearance. Now you know your comments will spin around the internet, examined and re-examined. One slip-up could be career ending – no wonder I don’t go on any more. The last time I was shaking so violently it was visible to viewers.
The BBC has driven the social media scrutiny of this show, promoting the hashtag and Twitter handle; it wants and feels it needs this input from viewers but at what cost? This isn’t a BBC problem, it is universal. It is part of my job to promote my own Channel 4 shows on social media. Because people now watch TV according to their own timetable you have to keep the chat up; the consolidated figures matter as much as the overnights. But this means that our contributors, my house hunters or redecorators are commented on, often harshly, and we have to make sure we advise them to avoid social media the night the show goes out.

Humans are critical of other humans, especially those who live seemingly privileged lives, and not much is going to change that

Channel 4 itself has a hugely successful show based on criticism of those on TV. Gogglebox, which has made millions for its producers, is all about watching others be critical. The first time I saw it, by horrible coincidence, they were “reviewing” my Christmas show. Watching people tear apart the fun, cosy Christmassy craft show that we put so much love into was a thoroughly unpleasant experience.
But, I hear you ask, when is she going to mention the money? Presenters are paid handsomely: there are reports that Caroline Flack was paid £1.2m for Love Island, so surely we can take all this in our stride? That is true, to an extent. A tough hide is needed, and everyone must find a way to deal with the comments. It is essential never to search for your name, not to have an alert for newspaper articles about yourself and to treat social media a bit like a gremlin: never expose it to alcohol and never feed it after midnight, however much it begs. But what happens when something goes wrong?
This is where we have to change policy within our industry. There needs to be a recognised protocol when people are in crisis. In 2018, I mentioned in a discussion on children and gaming on the Jeremy Vine show that I had “smashed” my kids’ iPads. The producers tweeted this comment with glee, recognising the newsworthy element that hadn’t occurred to me, and my comments went far beyond those who had watched the show. Within hours my Twitter account exploded with enraged gamers and furious mothers (though many admitted to a grudging respect that I had followed through on something they had often threatened). Newspapers as far away as Australia covered the story, and by that evening I realised that the only way to deal with this was to let it play out far from my sight.
I deleted my Twitter account and for many weeks I stayed away from social media, and I don’t read articles about myself anyway. I was lucky, I was in a good place, I hadn’t done anything that triggered the disrepute clause in my contract and I wasn’t facing suspension from work or worse. There is no comparison to what Caroline Flack experienced, but it offers me some insight into the best way to approach any period of increased scrutiny. It’s something that could be built upon and rolled out universally.
There should be an industry-wide acceptance that someone takes over your social media at a crisis point, and we should recognise that when people in the public eye are vulnerable they are in no position to be left alone with the internet. Real people do not come up to you in the street and say “you bitch, someone should take your kids into care”, but they do online. While exhorting others to be kind is no bad thing, I can’t see much change on the horizon as long as traditional media is locked in this death spiral with social media. We post to stay relevant, but what we post will get reported, it will keep the story alive. Humans are critical of other humans, especially those who live seemingly glamorous and privileged lives, and not much is going to change that. But a disparaging conversation that might once have taken place in the pub is now broadcast directly into the feed of the celebrity in question.

So those who make money from celebrities need to recognise this conflict and put in place proper safeguards. The television bosses, the agents of stars and the CEOs of social media companies are not the ones whose faces are splashed on the front of newspapers, and they need to do more to protect those that make them, in many cases, far more money, for far longer, than the stars that glitter and fade. If the loss of a human life does not make us wake up to this, God knows what will.
• Kirstie Allsopp is a broadcaster and author
• In the UK the Samaritans can be contacted on 116 123. In the US, the Tempemail Suicide Prevention Lifeline is 1-800-273-8255. In Australia, the crisis support service Lifeline is on 13 11 14. Other international suicide helplines can be found at www.befrienders.org

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No 10 calls on social media firms to act after Caroline Flack death | Media- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

No 10 has called on social media companies to go further to remove unacceptable content from their platforms in the wake of the death of television presenter Caroline Flack.
Boris Johnson’s deputy official spokesman said Flack’s death was a “tragedy”, adding “our thoughts are with her family and friends at this very difficult time”.
Politicians have condemned press intrusion, calling for more regulation of both traditional and social media after the death of Flack, who is understood to have taken her own life on Saturday at her home in London. She had been charged with assaulting her partner and was due to stand trial in several weeks’ time.
Asked for the prime minister’s view on social media bullying and press intrusion in light of Flack’s death, he said: “The industry must continue their efforts to go further. We expect them to have robust processes in place removing content breaching their acceptable use policies.” His answer appeared to be referring to social media companies rather than the press.
The spokesman declined to comment on ITV’s decision to pull episodes of Love Island and said the decision to charge Flack – even though her partner did not support the prosecution – was a matter for the Crown Prosecution Service.
In the wake of Flack’s death, companion programme Love Island Aftersun – which was due to air on Monday at 10pm on ITV2 – was also cancelled.
The show, broadcast on a Monday night directly after Love Island, is hosted by Laura Whitmore, who spoke of her affection for Flack and called on listeners to “be kind” during her BBC radio 5 Live show on Sunday.
The cancellation of the programme, which is filmed live in front of a studio audience in the UK and features panel discussions and games, follows ITV’s decision to pull Saturday’s omnibus Love Island: Unseen Bits and Sunday’s episode of the main show.
The main show is currently set to go out on Monday night with a tribute to Flack as part of the episode.
Labour leadership contender Keir Starmer criticised mainstream outlets for “amplifying” damaging social media posts about Flack, and signalled he would take action to “diversify” the press if he won the race to succeed Jeremy Corbyn.
The former director of public prosecutions said the presenter’s death “shocked a lot of people”, adding: “It wasn’t just social media, it was the media amplifying what social media was doing. It was both strands. There is a human impact.
“The press more widely have to take responsibility as well. Not just for the hatred and abuse but for the vilification constantly of Labour MPs and Labour leaders. We have got to do something to diversify our press, to have a better media.”
Fellow leadership contender Lisa Nandy said social media companies could not be left to police themselves, suggesting the current situation was like the “wild west”.
“I worry about the approaches that say we allow the social media companies to regulate themselves,” she said. “In no other area of life would we allow private companies to police themselves. We ought to make sure the state has a system of regulation and support around that.”
The transport secretary, Grant Shapps, in a media round on Sunday on behalf of the government, referred to the results of the online harms white paper consultation, which looked at ways of better protecting children and vulnerable people.
Shapps said he did not know the full circumstances of the case but said the Crown Prosecution Service had a duty of care.
In the UK and Ireland, Samaritans can be contacted on 116 123 or email [email protected] or [email protected] In the US, the Tempemail Suicide Prevention Lifeline is 1-800-273-8255. In Australia, the crisis support service Lifeline is 13 11 14. Other international helplines can be found at www.befrienders.org.

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Reports of social media’s influence on voters are greatly exaggerated | John Naughton | Opinion- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

You know the joke: one dark night, a policeman comes on a drunk rootling around under a street lamp. When asked what he’s doing, the guy says that he’s looking for his car keys. “Is this where you dropped them?” asks the cop. “No,” comes the reply. “Well, then why look for them here?” “Because at least here I can see what I’m doing.”
This joke has often come to mind since 2016 when reading explanations – especially media explanations – of the Brexit vote and Trump’s election. The general tenor is that it was all down to social media, Facebook, Twitter and YouTube in particular.
This has always seemed implausible to me. While it would obviously be ridiculous to deny that social media played some role in these political upheavals, it would be foolish to assign it the critical role. Apart from anything else, putting social media centre stage ignores what had been happening to democratic electorates during decades of globalisation, neoliberal economic policy, rising inequality and austerity. But because the rise of Facebook et al was one of the biggest changes over the last two decades, the temptation to see them as the place to look for explanations seems to have been well-nigh irresistible.
Fortunately, it was resisted by researchers at the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism in Oxford when they set out to understand where UK voters got their news during the 2019 general election. They tracked the online news consumption of 1,711 people aged 18-65 across mobile and desktop devices throughout the campaign and also surveyed a subset of 752 panellists before and after the vote. What the researchers were seeking to understand was the relative importance for voters of offline and online news and their attitudes to the media and politics more widely.
Their findings make intriguing reading, not least because they challenge some of the anecdotal conventional wisdom about the predominance of social media. Although online news sources (including news websites/apps and social media) were more widely used than any other source among those with internet access, BBC News was by far the most widely used online source for election news. It was accessed by 44% of the sample during the course of the election and was their main destination for election results.
Online news during the campaign was, the researchers report, “a winner-takes-most market, with just two providers, the BBC News and the MailOnline, accounting for nearly half (48%) the time spent with news and the top five (including the Guardian, the Sun, and the Mirror) accounting for two-thirds (66%) of the time spent”.
Cheery news for traditional news outlets, then? Er, not entirely. Only 3% of all internet time was spent with news. On average, people spent just 16 minutes per week online with news and made around 22 news visits each week. And young people (aged 18-34) were even less engaged with online news websites, spending only eight minutes a week and visiting fewer sites.
This could be because a winter election in a country that had already been bored to distraction by Brexit was never likely to attract much interest, especially among younger voters. Even so, eight minutes a week is a bit scary, especially when it turns out that 13% of those people got election news only from social media.
What about the filter bubbles and echo chambers then? Here the report challenges conventional wisdom. Although the researchers found some evidence for partisan selectivity, they also discovered “a lot of cross-cutting exposure (especially among those who rely on social media) and little evidence of partisan selective avoidance”. Even more interesting, very few people consumed news solely from outlets supporting the party they voted for, while there was little evidence of influence of the really partisan outfits such as the Canary and Novara Media on the left or Breitbart on the right. Similarly, foreign sites such as Russia Today and Sputnik attracted just 1% of the time spent with news, which amounts to about 0.02% of the time people spent online during the election. So much for Russian propaganda.
Of course this is just one survey of one – perhaps atypical – election. But it’s a welcome reminder that the role of social media in news consumption may be less dominant than we had come to think. The fact that two-thirds of the sample got their news from the online offerings of five traditional journalistic outfits, for example, is a cheering thought, even if one disapproves of some of the five. It chimes with the recent findings of the Pew survey in the US, which says that 64% of Americans still get their local news from TV or news websites, compared with 15% from social media.
And, as a nice kicker, the Oxford researchers found that “the majority of those who expressed a view felt the BBC had done a good job. BBC stories were widely viewed and read equally by Conservative and Labour voters.” That should make some of those Beeb-hating Tory MPs choke on their muesli.
What I’m reading
Classic Dom“Inside the mind of Dominic Cummings” is a terrific analysis by Stefan Collini in the Guardian of the thinking of the UK’s new project manager in chief.
Privacy on paradeIf you thought we’ve scraped the bottom of the privacy barrel, think again, is the verdict of A World Without Privacy Will Revive the Masquerade, a very thoughtful essay in the Atlantic by Jonathan Zittrain.
Computer literate?Douglas Engelbart’s 1962 paper Augmenting Human Intellect: A Conceptual Framework is a seminal treatise on what computers should be for.

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Bosses tell social media celebrities: TikTok on your own time | Technology- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

They are some of the most popular videos on the shortform video-sharing app TikTok – clips of uniformed employees, from builders to nurses to supermarket staff, dancing and goofing around in their workplaces.
But police forces and other employers are dissuading staff from posting videos, warning that they risk appearing unprofessional and urging them to not let social media “get in the way of doing their jobs”.
TikTok, the Chinese-owned app that was downloaded more than two million times a day worldwide last year by users mostly aged between 16 and 34, has already propelled homegrown stars such as 15-year-old Charli D’Amelio to household name status as a result of its viral videos. Now a subsection of the app is proving particularly popular among viewers: people dancing on building sites, in shops, or near police stations or hospitals – and it is those workers who are becoming minor TikTok celebrities.
Danny Harris, 35, who works on a building site in central London, first realised he had become famous when he was recognised by staff at a local bakery as being a member of SparksandTarts, a TikTok profile with 34,700 followers.
SparksandTarts’ first video, of five labourers performing a roughly choreographed dance on a city-centre rooftop to a song from the musical Pitch Perfect, has been seen a million times since it was posted a month ago. They’ve now posted 10 videos.
“It has definitely evolved into its own entity,” said Harris. “We’re having TikTok meetings in our breaks to plan what videos we’re going to try to get out there. It’s becoming more of a part-time job. People are messaging each other at the weekend saying: ‘We should try this video next.’”

We do this in our breaktimes and after tea

Danny Harris, builder and member of SparksandTarts

The popularity of uniformed TikToks has several factors, said Brendan Gahan, chief social officer at marketing agency Mekanism, including the “public embarrassment [which] is definitely fun and cringeworthy.”
The idea that the employees may be discovered skiving off work also attracts audiences, Gahan added. “Generally, the more a piece of content can spark that emotional response, the more it’s shared and sparks a response.”
Harris and his workmates asked for their London building site not to be identified. “We do this in our breaktimes and after tea, and it’s one of these things where all my bosses are happy with it, but, for the sake of the clients funding this build, it’s probably best we’re not advertising exactly where we are,” he said.
That is the fundamental issue many uniformed TikTokers face: while their antics show a different, often more welcoming side to their industry or companies, they run the risk of appearing less than professional.
One Tesco employee, Tyler Beattie, earned 65,000 fans for posting videos of himself dancing in his uniform. In a video posted a few weeks ago, Beattie explained he had been banned from uploading any more videos in uniform. (And he did not respond to many requests for comment.)
A Tesco spokesperson said: “Social media is a fun way to communicate and share information with others. As representatives of Tesco, we ask all our colleagues to use their judgment, respect and common sense online, and make sure that it doesn’t get in the way of doing their jobs.”
However, other Tesco employees continue to post videos from stores in uniform, participating in “challenges” – often carefully choreographed dances to popular songs – that go viral. Nor is it limited to Tesco: videos tagged with the names of the UK’s big four supermarkets have been seen 99 million times on TikTok.
Police officers and paramedics are also going viral on the app. One Cheshire police officer recently passed 10,000 TikTok followers for her insights into how the force operates. Clips of her and colleagues driving the streets to Ridin’ by Chamillionaire, and Sound of da Police by KRS-One have been viewed more than 700,000 times.
The comments to both videos are divided between those who enjoy the lighthearted look into a police officer’s life, and others who think it a distraction from a very serious job.
Peter Caldwell, Cheshire Constabulary’s digital media manager, said: “Social media is one of many channels we use to communicate with the public.” He added that his force has social media guidance it expects staff to follow while at work. “We currently use Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and Instagram to promote the work of the force – however, with the world of digital media constantly evolving, the guidance also applies to new and emerging social media channels.”
For Harris, the popularity of SparksandTarts has come as a surprise. But there is one sure-fire sign they have made the big time on TikTok: a protective and high-vis clothing company has been in touch, asking to send them products they could wear in their videos.
So-called “brand deals” are the holy grail for influencers – and it seems they can even be brokered on building sites.

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Your Dating Life Is Exactly Like Your Marketing Funnel – Social Cast Ep. 10 – Blog – 10 minute

First dates are a time for getting to know your love interest. Understanding the baseline of your partner’s wants and needs prepares a relationship for success, while the same holds true for client relationships in marketing.
In many ways, clients have a similar wishlist of desires that a new partner would. Typically, one seeks out a person who models honesty, understanding, patience, and effort. In marketing, this can be manifested through listening to the client and respecting boundaries.
Ultimately, practicing authenticity encourages a strong foundation and encourages long-term client retention. In dating, many of us struggle to keep the spark alive further down the relationship funnel. Similarly, in marketing it becomes a challenge to maintain a customer who is enthusiastic about the product they’re receiving.
A fantastic tool to combat this is by consistently providing the customer (or partner) with valuable information that will support them in achieving future growth or success. In marketing, this can mean being honest about your brand, while in dating it’s about being supportive of your partner’s aspirations.
Whether you’re spending this Valentine’s Day in the office or on a romantic date – or both – these tips will assist you in marketing and in love.

Are You an Overworked Social Media Manager Trying to Plan a Vacation?
Watch the Video

Some of the interesting comparisons we discuss in this episode include:

How can marketing strategies benefit from a relationship timeline?
What can dating goals teach us about long-term marketing expectations? 
How do ethics and honesty play a role in client retention?
How do personal relationships compare to a user journey?
What are the similarities between dating and marketing wishlists?

About the Social Cast:
Socialbakers’ podcast series tackles some of the most challenging and interesting aspects of marketing. Our experts offer tips, hacks, and advice on almost any marketing subject you can think of.
You can subscribe to our podcast on the following platforms:
In the previous episode, we spoke to expert Matt Shealy about how to build a top-notch remote marketing team. You can listen to that episode here, watch it here, and read Matt’s piece about the subject on our blog here.
Stay tuned for new episodes! 

Tempemail , Tempmail Temp email addressess (10 minutes emails)– When you want to create account on some forum or social media, like Facebook, Reddit, Twitter, TikTok you have to enter information about your e-mail box to get an activation link. Unfortunately, after registration, this social media sends you dozens of messages with useless information, which you are not interested in. To avoid that, visit this Temp mail generator: tempemail.co and you will have a Temp mail disposable address and end up on a bunch of spam lists. This email will expire after 10 minute so you can call this Temp mail 10 minute email. Our service is free! Let’s enjoy!