Google tells people to cut screen fatigue at home- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

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As people spend more time online attending meetings, classes, binge-watching Netflix and gaming, screen fatigue has affected millions and Google experts have now listed some advice to cut screen time and stay healthy.
To avoid getting pulled into your phone, you can use your voice to ask Google Assistant for help completing actions, like setting an alarm, sending a text, playing the latest news, getting answers to questions, help finding recipes or ordering takeout and much more.
“You can also create custom or ready-made Routines to trigger several actions with a single command,” according to Lilian Rincon, Senior Director of Product Management, Google Assistant.
The Google experts advise people to find active alternatives like stepping away from the screen and add physical activity into your life.
“If you have children, you could even exercise with them. As you make progress, use Google Fit to keep track and earn heart points which can help you meet the World Health Organisation recommendations,” said Kapil Parakh, Medical Lead, Google Fit.
If you have kids, chat with them about the content you each prefer and work with them to plan out a schedule for listening, watching, playing and interacting with it.
“Does the content align with your family’s values? Does the experience affect your kids’ behavior in ways that help them relax and/or thrive? If not, consider alternatives and discuss your reasoning. Use this guide to get help talking to your kids about finding positive content and other tech topics,” explained Jennifer Kotler, UXR Lead, Google Play.
Clearly segmenting work time and non-work time improves one’s satisfaction with their wellbeing, Google said in a statement.
Turning off notifications and putting your laptop out of sight reduces the tendency to check work email or hop into a last-minute video meeting.
“When it’s time to get back to work, take a few minutes to think through your goals for that work time before getting started. And create a dedicated workspace to signal to your brain that it’s time to focus,” said Jessica DiVento, Chief Mental Health Advisor, YouTube.
Blue light can have a negative impact on our natural sleep cycles by delaying the release of melatonin and increasing our alertness.
“Start with around 30 minutes of screen-free time before bed, and work your way up to two hours, depending on what works best for you. Try reading a book or listening to an audio program instead so you don’t have to engage with a screen,” advised Alan McLean, Designer, Google Wellbeing Lab.

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Tempemail , Tempmail Temp email addressess (10 minutes emails)– When you want to create account on some forum or social media, like Facebook, Reddit, Twitter, TikTok you have to enter information about your e-mail box to get an activation link. Unfortunately, after registration, this social media sends you dozens of messages with useless information, which you are not interested in. To avoid that, visit this Temp mail generator: tempemail.co and you will have a Temp mail disposable address and end up on a bunch of spam lists. This email will expire after 10 minute so you can call this Temp mail 10 minute email. Our service is free! Let’s enjoy!

Want to stand out on screen? Zoom in on that colossal collar… | Fashion- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

A look that brings to mind either William Shakespeare or Harry Hill is not one that immediately suggests sophisticated glamour. But big collars are having a resurgence, this time on women’s dresses, tops and jumpsuits.
The current look is less Renaissance bard and more pious puritan, and can be dramatic in scale, reaching the shoulders or even down to the belly button.
“We have seen a strong demand for the giant collar blouse this spring,” says Elizabeth von der Goltz, global buying director of Net-a-Porter. In general, she says, cotton blouses with exaggerated collars have been its bestselling style for tops, with designers from It-brand Ganni to Miu Miu getting in on the trend.
“The trend started on Instagram as a styling piece, often as a perfect contrast to something more masculine,” says von der Goltz.
Prime examples of the look are featured on the Instagram feed of Reese Blutstein, known as double3xposure to her 305,000 followers, or Man Repeller’s Leandra Medine. Both are recent champions of the big-collared designs of French label Maison Cléo.
Although expansive collars predate the pandemic, the fact that thousands of people are currently only being viewed from chest up on Zoom calls via laptops and phones has given the look a boost. Fashion historian Amber Butchart finds a historical echo in the 1930s, as “the decade that we really start to see film costumes impacting on fashion”.

At the moment, people really like getting back to the past

Marie Dewet

Butchart cites the work of Adrian, a 1930s costume designer, who put “an emphasis above the table”. His ethos for dressing leading ladies was, she explains, that “the most important details are those that are going to be seen when she’s in close up”. It’s an idea that could have come from the handbook of modern-day social media stars.
Butchart also looks to the less recent past, and says today’s collars are reminiscent of the falling-band collars of the 17th century: “a big wide collar that reached the shoulders” and took over from the extravagant Tudor ruff. Often made of expensive lace, the ruff had to be laboriously “starched, reset and re-pinned every time it was worn”, and was therefore condemned in Puritan pamphlets as “monstrous” and starched with the “devil’s liquor”. The fallen-band was made of simpler stuff, often linen, and were “associated with groups like the Oliver Cromwell’s Puritans.
These were also sported by the pilgrims to America. And that, she says, is where “we get these associations with wholesomeness from”. So, she suggests, these collars could now be part of a rose-tinted nostalgia for a rosy-cheeked past.
At Maison Cléo, which has been producing big-collared blouses for a few years, this year saw the introduction of vintage trims, in line with the trend for upcycling. Marie Dewet, one half of the team, says: “I think at the moment people really like getting back to the past.”

Blanca Miró and María de la Orden, the team behind La Veste, who supply their (almost sold-out) collars with scalloped trimmings as separate items as well as on blouses, are inspired by a different kind of past: primary school. Their necklines can be read as a progeny of the last few years’ fashion for infantilised styles. 
Whether big collars signal Puritanism, the playground, or simply bring to mind a certain playwright – expect to see them coming soon to a small screen near you.

Tempemail , Tempmail Temp email addressess (10 minutes emails)– When you want to create account on some forum or social media, like Facebook, Reddit, Twitter, TikTok you have to enter information about your e-mail box to get an activation link. Unfortunately, after registration, this social media sends you dozens of messages with useless information, which you are not interested in. To avoid that, visit this Temp mail generator: tempemail.co and you will have a Temp mail disposable address and end up on a bunch of spam lists. This email will expire after 10 minute so you can call this Temp mail 10 minute email. Our service is free! Let’s enjoy!

Don’t despair if your child is glued to a screen, it may be keeping them sane | Amy Orben | Opinion- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

Should we start to use “physical distancing” instead of “social distancing”? Those keen on the change argue that, despite being physically apart, we can still be socially together. So we can connect and support each other even when avoiding unnecessary face-to-face contact.

Sure, change the label. But it won’t change the reality of what might well be a long period of curtailed social interaction with anyone outside our own home, a reality that’s especially significant for children and young people.
Social contact and stimulation shape our lives from the very start. By the time they’re a few months old, infants start engaging with the social world around them, participating first in the simplest of interactions through gestures and facial expressions. From then on our lives are governed by our surroundings: they determine how we learn, develop and feel.
Harrowing animal research studied by undergraduate psychology students around the world illustrates how the deprivation of social contact in childhood and adolescence can have negative effects on development that extend long into adulthood.
So how concerned should we be about the current lockdown and how it might be affecting children and adolescents? First, it’s important to recognise that most of them will not be spending lockdown deprived of all social contact, as in the animal studies, but in close interaction with their family. What they are specifically locked away from is social contact with their peers.
The importance of peer contact changes across development. Infants and children mainly depend on attention given by parents or caretakers, with the importance of peer contact growing from that point onwards, probably reaching its maximum importance in adolescence. At this age, you are focused on your peers. In turn, peer approval becomes especially influential in shaping decisions and behaviour, as adolescents start probing their place in a maturing social world.
While there is so far only minimal research on the lockdown, one could easily hypothesise that adolescents might suffer especially. The evidence that we do have – colleagues and I are currently immersed in research on the theme – seems to point in that direction. While a study of 60,000 people in lockdown by University College London did not survey under-18s, it found that the youngest in the sample (18- to 24-year-olds) were suffering most, showing the highest levels of loneliness and feeling down, while those over 60 were showing the highest levels of life satisfaction. Anecdotal evidence from parents reinforces the view that it is often teenagers most struggling with being apart from their friends. And we know that most mental health problems first appear during adolescence.

Digital interactions can make us feel less socially excluded

And yet, on the upside, we are also living in a time when society is more digitally connected than ever. Technologies such as social media, video call applications, group chats or social video games offer contact without us having to be in physical proximity.
At least some of the positive consequences of face-to-face social interaction can be mimicked through digital means. Digital interactions can make us feel less socially excluded and aspects of socialising via technologies have been shown to activate reward systems in our brain.
With contact being so important to adolescents, it’s therefore unsurprising that over the last decades they have often been among the first widespread users of these social technologies. And now, the potential of these digital innovations to mitigate some of the negative consequences of children and adolescents separated from their friends should not be underestimated.
Many parents are worried, of course, about how their children’s screen time is going through the roof during this crisis. But now more than ever we need to stop considering as a valuable metric the simple time spent on screens. Screens are not drugs that have definite impacts on brain and behaviour; indeed, high-quality evidence that screens themselves do widespread harm is almost non-existent.
We should instead focus on what activities are engaged in via these screens. It’s the nature of the activities that screens help mediate that determines how we are affected by their use. When we’re sitting across from someone staring at a digital screen for long periods of time, the diversity of activities they they’re engaged in is often not apparent. So we might judge the use uniform and monotonous.
So I encourage parents to worry less about time spent by their children on screens and instead focus on what they’re doing with them. Activities such as video calling friends, exchanges via social media or playing Fortnite with friends online will all help keep children and teenagers connected throughout the lockdown.
Yet this also puts a spotlight on the digital divide that still affects Britain today, with children in disadvantaged households – without their own personal technological equipment or a high-speed internet connection – experiencing an additional setback, another expression of our inequalities. In the circumstances, our youngest have never been more in need of digitised connection.
• Dr Amy Orben is research fellow at Emmanuel College, University of Cambridge and the MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit

Tempemail , Tempmail Temp email addressess (10 minutes emails)– When you want to create account on some forum or social media, like Facebook, Reddit, Twitter, TikTok you have to enter information about your e-mail box to get an activation link. Unfortunately, after registration, this social media sends you dozens of messages with useless information, which you are not interested in. To avoid that, visit this Temp mail generator: tempemail.co and you will have a Temp mail disposable address and end up on a bunch of spam lists. This email will expire after 10 minute so you can call this Temp mail 10 minute email. Our service is free! Let’s enjoy!

‘At times like these, connection is more important than ever’: How to manage your screen time and social media use during lockdown- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

The outbreak of the coronavirus and subsequent lockdown has placed greater emphasis on the ways and extent to which we use our smart devices on a daily basis.
Having been separated from the majority of our friends and family members due to social distancing measures, many of us are now having to rely on platforms such as Zoom and Houseparty in order to keep in touch with our loved ones.
While members of the public might normally go to the gym as part of their weekly routine, many are now partaking in live-streamed fitness sessions from the comfort of their homes in an attempt to maintain structure in their lives.

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Activities such as video chats, virtual fitness classes and continuous scrolling through newsfeeds on social media have resulted in an increase in the amount of time many people are spending on their phones — a fact that hasn’t gone unnoticed.

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Over the past few years, there have been several conflicting research into the impact excessive screen time can have on a person’s mental health. In July 2019, a study published in journal JAMA Paediatrics concluded that young people who spend an increased amount of time in front of digital screens are more likely to exhibit symptoms of depression.
However, another study published a few months prior by researchers at the University of Oxford found that using devices such as smartphones, tablets and laptops “is no worse for teenagers’ mental health than eating more potatoes”.
Given the fact that during these uncertain times, many people are using their devices to communicate with others to stay well-informed on news and to seek out distractions, how should we be managing our screen time?
Quality of screen time is more important than quantity
Dr Alice Good, senior lecturer in the School of Computing at the University of Portsmouth, explains that the “current restrictions on freedom of movement” could have a detrimental impact on people’s mental wellbeing, as some may find themselves feeling increasingly isolated in their surroundings.
As such, social networking platforms could “become a crucial lifeline, not least in helping people to be socially connected even whilst physically disconnected”.

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Women dance on their balcony as a radio station plays music for a flash mob to raise spirits in Rome
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A skeleton stands on a balcony in Frankfurt, Germany
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Cellist Karina Nunez performs for her neighbours at the balcony of her flat in Panama City
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Residents toast during a “safe distance” aperitif time between neighbours in Anderlecht, Belgium
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Musician Adam Moser plays for neighbours from his balcony in Budapest, Hungary
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A man and his son on their balcony in Brooklyn
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A man sits alone on a roof terrace in Rome
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A rose is delivered by drone to a woman on Mother’s Day in Jounieh, Lebanon
AFP/Getty

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Women dance on their balcony as a radio station plays music for a flash mob to raise spirits in Rome
Reuters

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A skeleton stands on a balcony in Frankfurt, Germany
AP

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The film Le ragazze di Piazza di Spagna is projected on a building in Rome
AP

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A woman uses a basket tied to a rope to pull a delivery of groceries up to her balcony in Naples, Italy
EPA

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DJ Francesco Cellini plays for his neighbours from the rooftop terrace of his flat block in Rome
Reuters

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A woman gestures from her balcony in Barcelona
EPA

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Cellist Karina Nunez performs for her neighbours at the balcony of her flat in Panama City
Reuters

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DJ Nash Petrovic live streams a set from his roof in Brooklyn
Reuters

10/15
People applaud medical workers from their balconies in Modiin, Israel
Reuters

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A Brooklyn resident relaxes in a hammock hung on their balcony
Reuters

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Residents toast during a “safe distance” aperitif time between neighbours in Anderlecht, Belgium
Reuters

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Musician Adam Moser plays for neighbours from his balcony in Budapest, Hungary
Reuters

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A man and his son on their balcony in Brooklyn
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A man sits alone on a roof terrace in Rome
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“We have to consider not how much screen time we have, but how we are choosing to use it,” Dr Good tells The Independent.

“Our screens have become a portal to reach out to people, raise morale, but most importantly, to recreate the communities that have been slowly dissipating. We are stronger and more resilient together.”

Dr Good adds that many people, including herself, are having to do more work on their screens than they would have previously. “This is just how it is in current times,” she states.
Nonetheless, the World Health Organisation (WHO) suggests that people should try to “be aware of how much time you spend in front of a screen every day”, factoring in “regular breaks from on-screen activities”.
Moreover, with schools being closed and all but essential workers being told to stay at home, parents are having to come up with inventive ways to keep their children occupied throughout the day. In this case, digital screens could prove essential.

Read more

“Parents don’t need to be feeling guilty right now,” Dr Good says. “This is such a lifeline to so many.”
Becca Cawthorne, senior communications officer at Childnet International, a partner in the UK Safer Internet Centre, reiterates this view, telling The Independent that it is “useful for parents and carers to think about what children are doing online rather than the time they are spending”.
“During this time, it is understandable that children’s time online will increase significantly and that this may cause concern,” Ms Cawthorne says, advising that carers decide with their children when devices should be used during the day, discuss when they might be used in a group environment and establish clear boundaries as a household.

Carolyn Bunting, CEO of non-profit organisation Internet Matters, recommends that parents “encourage children to be intentional about their screen time”, which can involve using a digital device for educational purposes or partaking in activities such as Joe Wicks’s daily PE lessons.
Striving to be intentional with screen time carries across to older generations too, particularly as so many of us are spending an increasing amount of time on social media.
Keep a wary eye on social media
While social media can be a fantastic tool for uniting people during troubling times, it can also cause further panic depending on the content that you are exposed to.

If you find yourself feeling anxious when using social media in the current climate, the Mental Health Foundation advises assessing the way in which you spend your time on platforms such as Twitter or Facebook.

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“Tune in with yourself and ask if it needs adjusting,” the organisation states.
“Are there particular accounts or people that are increasing your worry or anxiety? Consider muting [hashtags] or unfollowing accounts that cause you to feel anxious.”
Chris O’Sullivan, head of fundraising and communications for the Mental Health Foundation in Scotland and Northern Ireland, suggests focusing the majority of your attention on the “good stuff” while on social media.

“Whatever makes you feel happy, inspired and connected with people who you care about,” he states. “At times like these, connection is more important than ever, and social media, video conferencing and collaboration software can enable that.”
On the other hand, Mr O’Sullivan adds that if you are going to share content, then you should do so “with care” so as to consider the mental wellbeing of others.

“Think about what you are sharing and who it is visible to. Some content you might post innocently can upset or distress others – especially at times like this,” he says.

Dr Good stresses that there is “an awful lot of exaggerated information” on the internet, “and nowhere is that more apparent than on social media”.
“There’s a lot of supposed experts posting their opinions. A lot of people are susceptible to the scaremongering and believing what they’re writing,” the academic states.
What measures should you take when reading news on the internet?
Being cautious about the amount of time you are spending on social media and aware of the impact specific accounts are having on your mental wellbeing is especially important given the unprecedented times we are in.

This also applies to the amount of time you spend reading the news, as doing so to an excessive degree could lead to you feeling overwhelmed.

Read more

“Try to reduce how much you watch, read or listen to news that makes you feel anxious or distressed. Seek the latest information at specific times of the day, once or twice a day if needed,” the WHO states.
The Mental Health Foundation adds that it is “important to find a balance” if the news is “causing you huge stress”.

“It’s best that you don’t avoid all news and that you keep informing and educating yourself – but limit your news intake if it is bothering you,” the organisation says.
“Rumour and speculation can fuel anxiety. Having access to good quality information about the virus can make you feel more in control. The UK, Scots and Welsh government websites are sources of reliable information.”

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People clap from a block of flats opposite St Thomas’ Hospital in London. Briton’s were encouraged to clap for carers at 8pm local time to celebrate employees of the NHS
EPA

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Staff outside the St James’s University Hospital in Leeds, wave to people applauding them from their balconies
PA

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A sign by Wembley Park Tube Station in London that thanks the hardworking NHS staff
PA

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Barbara Leigh, aged 93, (second left) rings a bell for the NHS, with her family who are all staying together throughout the lockdown, from their front garden across the road from Wythenshawe Hospital in Manchester
Getty

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NHS staff respond as people in Blackpool join in the national applause
PA

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Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak applaud outside 10 Downing Street
Reuters

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Staff from the Royal Liverpool University Hospital join in a national applause
PA

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Tyne Bridge lit up in blue to support the NHS
Reuters

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Residents in a Northampton street applaud
Getty

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Princes George (right), Louis (centre) and Princess Charlotte joining in a national applause for the NHS as people across the country showed their appreciation for all NHS workers who are helping to fight the coronavirus
Duke and Duchess of Cambridge/PA

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People in Woodford Green, London, join in a national applause
PA

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People in flats wave the Scottish flag in Glasgow as they join in a national applause for the NHS
PA

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Ventura’, a Grand-class cruise ship of the P&O Cruises fleet, docked at Southampton Docks shows its support for the NHS by lighting up rooms on the cruise ship to spell ‘#I LOVE NHS’
Getty Images

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Staff from the Royal Liverpool University Hospital join in a national applause
PA

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The SSE Hydro in Glasgow is lit up in blue in a gesture of thanks to the hardworking NHS staff
PA

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Residents applaud NHS staff for all their hard work during the Coronaviroutbreak in Glasgow
Getty Images

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Wembley Arch in London is lit up in blue in a gesture of thanks to the hardworking NHS staff
PA

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Dr Olivera Potparic Anestesis applauds her colleagues after finishing a 12 hour shift at Chelsea and Westminster Hospital
Reuters

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Residents in a Northampton street applaud in support of the NHS
Getty

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People applaud infront of big screen in Piccadilly Circus
Reuters

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People applaud the NHS from their balconies and gardens across the road from Wythenshawe Hospital
Getty

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A police officer joins staff from the Royal Liverpool University Hospital in a national applause for the NHS
PA

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The London Eye is pictured lit blue in support of the NHS
Reuters

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People applaud the NHS from their balconies and gardens across the road from Wythenshawe Hospital
Getty

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NHS workers wave from a window at Chelsea and Westminster Hospital
Reuters

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People applaud the NHS from their balconies and gardens across the road from Wythenshawe Hospital
Getty

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Redcar Pier lit up in blue
Redcar & Cleveland Borough Council/PA

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Duchess of Cornwall and the Prince of Wales joining in the national applause for the NHS workers battling coronavirus, coupled with photos from previous visits to NHS facilities
Instagram/clarencehouse/PA

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People applaud the NHS from their balconies and gardens across the road from Wythenshawe Hospital
Getty

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A family applaud outside their home during the Clap for our carers campaign in support of the NHS in Newcastle-under-Lyme
Reuters

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People applaud outside their homes in Parsonage Gardens during the Clap For Our Carers campaign in support of the NHS, as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, EnfieldPeople applaud outside their homes in Parsonage Gardens during the Clap For Our Carers campaign in support of the NHS in Enfield
Reuters

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People show appreciation outside Chelsea and Westminster Hospital
Reuters

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People clap from a block of flats opposite St Thomas’ Hospital in London. Briton’s were encouraged to clap for carers at 8pm local time to celebrate employees of the NHS
EPA

2/32
Staff outside the St James’s University Hospital in Leeds, wave to people applauding them from their balconies
PA

3/32
A sign by Wembley Park Tube Station in London that thanks the hardworking NHS staff
PA

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Barbara Leigh, aged 93, (second left) rings a bell for the NHS, with her family who are all staying together throughout the lockdown, from their front garden across the road from Wythenshawe Hospital in Manchester
Getty

5/32
NHS staff respond as people in Blackpool join in the national applause
PA

6/32
Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Chancellor of the Exchequer Rishi Sunak applaud outside 10 Downing Street
Reuters

7/32
Staff from the Royal Liverpool University Hospital join in a national applause
PA

8/32
Tyne Bridge lit up in blue to support the NHS
Reuters

9/32
Residents in a Northampton street applaud
Getty

10/32
Princes George (right), Louis (centre) and Princess Charlotte joining in a national applause for the NHS as people across the country showed their appreciation for all NHS workers who are helping to fight the coronavirus
Duke and Duchess of Cambridge/PA

11/32
People in Woodford Green, London, join in a national applause
PA

12/32
People in flats wave the Scottish flag in Glasgow as they join in a national applause for the NHS
PA

13/32
Ventura’, a Grand-class cruise ship of the P&O Cruises fleet, docked at Southampton Docks shows its support for the NHS by lighting up rooms on the cruise ship to spell ‘#I LOVE NHS’
Getty Images

14/32
Staff from the Royal Liverpool University Hospital join in a national applause
PA

15/32
The SSE Hydro in Glasgow is lit up in blue in a gesture of thanks to the hardworking NHS staff
PA

16/32
Residents applaud NHS staff for all their hard work during the Coronaviroutbreak in Glasgow
Getty Images

17/32
Wembley Arch in London is lit up in blue in a gesture of thanks to the hardworking NHS staff
PA

18/32
Dr Olivera Potparic Anestesis applauds her colleagues after finishing a 12 hour shift at Chelsea and Westminster Hospital
Reuters

19/32
Residents in a Northampton street applaud in support of the NHS
Getty

20/32
People applaud infront of big screen in Piccadilly Circus
Reuters

21/32
People applaud the NHS from their balconies and gardens across the road from Wythenshawe Hospital
Getty

22/32
A police officer joins staff from the Royal Liverpool University Hospital in a national applause for the NHS
PA

23/32
The London Eye is pictured lit blue in support of the NHS
Reuters

24/32
People applaud the NHS from their balconies and gardens across the road from Wythenshawe Hospital
Getty

25/32
NHS workers wave from a window at Chelsea and Westminster Hospital
Reuters

26/32
People applaud the NHS from their balconies and gardens across the road from Wythenshawe Hospital
Getty

27/32
Redcar Pier lit up in blue
Redcar & Cleveland Borough Council/PA

28/32
Duchess of Cornwall and the Prince of Wales joining in the national applause for the NHS workers battling coronavirus, coupled with photos from previous visits to NHS facilities
Instagram/clarencehouse/PA

29/32
People applaud the NHS from their balconies and gardens across the road from Wythenshawe Hospital
Getty

30/32
A family applaud outside their home during the Clap for our carers campaign in support of the NHS in Newcastle-under-Lyme
Reuters

31/32
People applaud outside their homes in Parsonage Gardens during the Clap For Our Carers campaign in support of the NHS, as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, EnfieldPeople applaud outside their homes in Parsonage Gardens during the Clap For Our Carers campaign in support of the NHS in Enfield
Reuters

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People show appreciation outside Chelsea and Westminster Hospital
Reuters

Dr Good adds that there is “an awful lot of exaggerated information” on the internet, which is why you need to tread carefully when listening to the views “of supposed experts”.
“A lot of people are susceptible to the scaremongering and believing what they are writing,” the university lecturer.
“It’s important to drive the message forward that there are specific sites that people should be checking their information from, and that obviously is NHS, gov.uk and WHO.”

Tempemail , Tempmail Temp email addressess (10 minutes emails)– When you want to create account on some forum or social media, like Facebook, Reddit, Twitter, TikTok you have to enter information about your e-mail box to get an activation link. Unfortunately, after registration, this social media sends you dozens of messages with useless information, which you are not interested in. To avoid that, visit this Temp mail generator: tempemail.co and you will have a Temp mail disposable address and end up on a bunch of spam lists. This email will expire after 10 minute so you can call this Temp mail 10 minute email. Our service is free! Let’s enjoy!

Is five hours of screen time really too much? Media, parenting, and working from home during Covid-19- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

All around the world, parents are unexpectedly facing the challenges of working from home while taking care of their children, creating a tricky balance. This has meant learning new skills and experiences; muting your computer during Zoom calls just as a scream erupts from another room, writing one email in five intermittent bursts, using nap time as the most productive 90 minutes of your entire career, slyly googling answers to schoolwork so that your child doesn’t realize you have no idea what the capital of Ghana is (it’s Accra, btw), etc. But thankfully we’re not in this alone! The universe has provided us with some amazing parenting tools like the iPad, Amazon and the Disney vault courtesy of Disney+.
Media, of course, has always had an important role in parenting, but the situation today has imparted even more meaning into how families use it. Media can be our best ally. It helps us keep kids entertained (silent and distracted), keeps them connected to their normal lives (the magical world of virtual daycare and classrooms), offers a place for parents to vent (passive-aggressive posts about their child’s latest ridiculous behavior), and find our own escape from this crazy and unprecedented time (two words: Tiger. King).
Parents, after accepting the reality of what it means to be on lockdown and have quickly become really good at post-rationalizing—breaking some of our own rules. 30 minutes of screen time a month ago somehow became three hours today. Because, of course, FaceTime doesn’t count as ‘screen time,’ it’s just ‘modern babysitting.’
We’ve changed the audio settings on any cartoon to turn it into a foreign language class. We’ve used our half-remembered Hamlet to explain the family dynamics between Scar and Mufasa so the kids can watch The Lion King twice in a row without being fully traumatized. We’re making sure they become good humans through the moral guidance of Daniel Tiger and obviously, everyone needs to know the story of Rapunzel as narrated by Mandy Moore. And then there’s homeschool—who knew Miss Megan and her Kindergarten Camp would provide the break we needed to get through morning email?
We play this justification game because we feel the need to assuage our inner critic, the one who constantly berates us that an easy solution is a cop out. But these have become times when the goal is not complete success, but complete sanity. What would we do without the few minutes of peace technology can offer parents? Who can blame a tired father for letting Sonos play “Wheels on the Bus” on repeat after personally singing it 23 times that day?
While there’s nothing new with kids watching some cartoons and Disney movies, Covid-19 did create a generation of kids savvy at video conferencing as early as 18 months old. Kids follow Zoom singalongs and story time sessions with a level of focus and dedication you rarely see during work conference calls, and an ability to adjust call options you usually need to call your IT department for. But having children connect with their own peers and keeping to a familiar structure has more value than an arbitrary number of allocated digital minutes. Playdates with best friends over FaceTime might have seemed crazy just a few short weeks ago, but now they’re an essential way to help our kids maintain their own relationships—the childhood version of the Zoom Happy Hour.
For parents, social media can be great for catharsis. I’ve become addicted to friends’ Instagram Stories for a daily dose of “I’m not alone in this.” Some Microsoft Teams conversations have shifted from business insights to parenting horror stories or trading of tips on just how to get through. And overall, the Internet meme-factory is in full gear. It’s as if parents all around the world have finally discovered what the Internet is really about. Imgur is finally mainstream.
Media is more meaningful to all at this moment in history, but it takes on a special meaning for parents caught in the balancing act of parenting and working from home. Those of us who are used to, in comedian Ali Wong’s words, “working very hard to not take care of our child ourselves,” are now in the delicate position of doing both, and flexibility is vital. Almost as vital as Wong’s Netflix specials.
Neala Brown is the global head of Mx Measurement for Havas Media Group

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CBA reveals screen scrapers double its customer fraud propensity – Finance – Security- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

The Commonwealth Bank of Australia has fired a broadside into widespread claims that the use of screen scraping isn’t boosting online banking fraud or hitting consumers, disclosing usually tightly held internal cyber security figures in response to questions from the fintech inquiry.
But it’s not exactly shouting it from the rooftops.
A reply to questions on notice lodged with the Senate select committee on financial technology and regulatory technology published this week reveals Australia’s largest institution has calculated customers who have used data aggregators at least double their risk of copping a digital fraud hit.
The publication of the risk assessment is an eye-popper, not least because it is based on actual bank data rather than the usual rubbery figures and vague factoids regularly spun-up and bleated out by cyber security vendors and major consultancies spruiking their services.
CommBank doesn’t explicitly enumerate the losses it is copping as a result of the controversial data harvesting fudge; but the stinker of a risk number helps explain why the institution has played hardball on the issue to the extent of losing reputation paint, especially as a conga line of fintechs line-up to kick the bank and label it anti-competitive.
“CBA’s fraud analytics team conducted a study on the fraud propensity of customers who had logins via a data aggregator, where we could identify an aggregator. The analysis found that customers with logins via an aggregator are two or more times more likely to experience fraud, a statistically significant result at a 95 per cent confidence interval,” CBA’s general manager for government, industry and sustainability, Euan Robertson wrote.
“Whilst the study does not attribute cause for the statistical relationship, it does demonstrate a probable correlation between the unsafe banking practice of customers who share log-ons and password credentials with third parties and increased fraud. Behaviours that place customers at greater risk should not be encouraged.”
Robertson’s evidence provided to the committee comes after ASIC representatives played down the potential negative consequences of screen scraping in hearing prior to the CBA’s new evidence.
In evidence given to the fintech inquiry in late February ASIC’s acting executive director, financial services, Tim Gough said that “there’s no evidence of which we’re aware of any consumer loss from screen scraping.”
The CBA’s latest evidence, while not explicitly spelling out fraud loss numbers, essentially contests that assertion.
It also shifts the spotlight onto how the finance industry cop runs its review of the of the ePayments Code – essentially ASIC’s self-regulatory rulebook for attributing responsibilities and liabilities within the payments and banking ecosystem, will be a pivotal point for banks, fintechs, merchants.
Although down in the weeds of payments self-regulation, ASIC’s review of the ePayments Code is pivotal for banks because it could reset the anachronistic mechanism that allows banks and global card schemes to sheet back losses to merchants.
At the moment merchants, who pay handsome fees for everything from credit card slugs to buy-now pay-later clips, are forced to eat online losses that ride that ‘scheme’ credit card rails that also rope in debit payments made through Mastercard and Visa.
There are broad industry fears that fintechs and data aggregators who encourage the sharing of login credentials through screen scraping are unintentionally creating fraud data buckets that could be quickly weaponised if hacked.
Gough said in February that ASIC was “not planning to do anything drastic either” in terms of restricting screen scraping regulation.
A lot has changed since then.

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ANZ tries to defuse screen scraping time bomb – Cloud – Security – Software – Finance- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

The ANZ Banking Group has moved to defuse escalating hostility between the big banks and angry Australian fintechs amid accusations that incumbent institutions are using the issue of customer data security to smother competition by challengers.
As debate continues to rage over whether regulators should ban the increasingly common industry practice of screen scraping to onboard customers, ANZ’s chief data officer Emma Gray has proposed a system of different data sensitivity levels combined with trusted intermediaries to act as data or ‘insight’ brokers.
The proposal from ANZ represents a compromise or ‘third option’ in the row that has played out extensively during the government’s Fintech and Regtech inquiry that has been overrun with submissions.
Breaking the impasse
To date, the debate over screen scraping – which usually involves customers handing over their bank account access details like log-in credentials to external parties to access customer data – has hinged around fintechs going against decades of customer education not to share security credentials.
While the government and financial regulators are playing a straight bat on the issue, cyber security hard heads, including Alastair MacGibbon have cautioned against a credential sharing free-for-all.
The Commonwealth Bank of Australia has become a particular target for fintechs because it fires off alerts to customers warning them they could be violating their account security terms, and thus fraud indemnity, when it detects screen scrapers are being used.
While the CBA argues the maintenance of account security is paramount, fintechs have repeatedly slammed the bank and accused it of trying to lock out their businesses from making legitimate competitive offers under the Open Banking and the Consumer Data Right.
Accreditation row an awkward fit
The row between the big banks and upstart challengers in large part revolves around the CDR accreditation regime which imposes strict data security conditions to get data at an API level, with smaller players complaining the compliance requirements are onerous and would make them unviable.
As a fudge to get around the strict data sharing requirements that are still not mature, many fintechs – as well as many banks – use screen scrapers to harvest necessary account data.
ANZ does not see the issue as a binary question of whether to ban or allow. Rather it says the one-size-fits-all compliance model needs improvement and customer data access needs to be more nuanced and contextual
“One issue is the [access] regime currently has one level of accreditation to receive bank data. To get this level of accreditation, entities must prove they can meet a high level of data security. This is appropriate because the data currently in play is customer bank records,” ANZ’s Gray wrote on the bank’s Bluenotes forum.
“To lower barriers to entry, and maintain the ability to innovate while limiting the proliferation of data share in the economy, ANZ thinks additional (lower) levels of accreditation that are easier to obtain could be introduced. These ‘easier to obtain’ accreditation levels would link to either less sensitive CDR data, or simply insights from data, rather than the data itself.”
Least worst option
As it currently stands, the Australian Securities and Investments Commission and the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission are essentially tolerating screen scraping as a stop-gap measure to allow access to open banking data until better solutions come around.
The fintech sector went into a frenzy on Friday after ASIC and ACCC executives on Friday told the government’s Fintech Inquiry there were no immediate plans to ban the controversial practice given its proliferation.
ASIC’s acting executive director, financial services, Tim Gough told the Fintech Committee that the regulator was aware that the use of screen scrapers didn’t gel with the message not to share passwords.
“We’ve said, and I think regulators consistently have said to consumers: ‘Be careful with your passcodes. Don’t share them with other parties.’ We’ve been watching the extent to which consumers are being asked to moderate their behaviour to take advantage of these kinds of services, and particularly looking for evidence of consumer loss,” Gough said.
Definition of a loser
Gough said that currently “there’s no evidence of which we’re aware of any consumer loss from screen scraping,” and added that ASIC was “not planning to do anything drastic either” in terms of restricting the controversial practice.
“Our revised RG 209 acknowledges that screen scraping and digital data capture can provide access to information to be utilised as part of a responsible lending assessment process,” Gough said.
“We’re otherwise watching, but we haven’t seen a need to act to date. It’s also a live question as we review the ePayments Code.”
The review of the ePayments Code, essentially ASIC’s self-regulatory rulebook for attributing responsibilities and liabilities within the payments and banking ecosystem, will be a pivotal point for banks, fintechs, merchants and consumers because much of it is arguably out of date.
For example banks are still able to shift liability for online card fraud to back to merchants because of an archaic loophole that dates back to a risk framework designed for mail-order purchases, chat lines and other potentially risqué over-the-phone card purchases that moved to the internet.
Under the current system, banks in Australia can and do shift around $450 million worth of online debit and credit card fraud riding on Mastercard, Visa and American Express’ payments rails.
Systemic worries
Fintechs are lobbying intensely for the revised ePayments Code to water down liability provisions that banks now use to chase customers away from screen scrapers, especially liability carve-outs around password sharing that can limit bank losses if customers knowingly and willingly expose or share their credentials.
However any such relaxation has many in the broader payments system deeply worried because of the potential for businesses that use screen scraping to become honeypots for hackers hunting for fresh meat now that technologies like card virtualisation are biting into fraud revenues.
Payments sources told iTnews the potential for customer compromise stemming from a hacked screen scraping user was far worse than credit and debit card fraud because it would be base bank accounts, not just the cards that run off them.
This could mean that people’s entire accounts would need to be scrapped and rebuilt in the event they were harvested and became “toxic”. In the event of a substantial successful raid, the cost of clean-up would be “exponentially” higher on source said.
A further concern is that the current Fintech gold rush is attracting a cohort of carpetbaggers from the payday lending and predatory credit industry who are than willing to push the regulatory envelope.
While ASIC gave evidence last Friday that it was yet to observe any “consumer loss” as a result of screen scraping, financial law and customer advocates have submitted that some lenders with scraped access to bank accounts wait for balances to fall before making targeted offers.
Lowering the bar
The way ANZ sees it, consumers Fintechs and banks should not need to bet the farm on a single level of data access and Gray argues that “Australia will have a hard time gaining ground in the digital economy if it doesn’t have consumer confidence in deployment of the CDR across sectors.” 
To help build that confidence, Gray argues that not everyone needs to see everything to get the answers they need to provide competing services under Open Banking.
One example cited by ANZ is contesting home loan insurance, where an offer requires proof of 36 months of up to date repayments from a mortgagee.
Gray sets out the scenario this way:

“A fintech could confirm this in two ways; both gives them the ability to provide the value add service:
First, with customer consent, it could access all of their loan repayment records by becoming an ‘unrestricted’ ‘accredited person’;
OR
The fintech could ask an unrestricted accredited entity that holds the data a simpler ‘yes or no’ question about whether the customer has been current on their mortgage repayments for the previous 36 months.
In this second scenario, the data is still quite sensitive and requires a level of security but it is clearly not as sensitive as having access to all of the customer’s data. The benefit of having multiple levels of accreditation is that the level of regulation is calibrated to the level of risk.”

 
The question that begs from that last statement is whether the fintech sector will be prepared to work with a “need to know” regime, or still seek access to customers’ accounts and data via screen scrapers.
Lost and found
With comparison sites like Finder now trying to turn a coin from account flipping under the CDR, those looking for speed and ease in access to data over security are pushing hard.
“If we were to rule out and get rid of screen-scraping we would essentially send Australians back 10 years,” Finder’s chief executive and co-founder Fred Schebesta told the Fintech Inquiry last month
“We obviously have to find the checks and balances and safe and responsible and regulated ways to do that, but we should work towards that and finding accredited ways to make that happen and let them join in with this new program. I wouldn’t kill it, because we would be basically sending us all back in time.”
“Imagine a world where you could one-click switch your super. Imagine a world where you could one-click switch your mortgage. Imagine a world where you can make those changes now,” Schebesta implored the Fintech Inquiry.
Imagine a world where people didn’t steal money, respected your privacy or and sell customer data or rapacious loans the exploit the vulnerable.
Emma Gray’s modest proposal might not set the fintech world on fire, but it could achieve a much-needed middle ground before a consumer confidence is the CDR dented by a major incident or bank accounts being compromised by consumers being confused or duped into oversharing.

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Latest AMD Radeon drivers are meant to address black screen issues – Blog – 10 minute

In our recent opinion piece ‘Gamers are ditching Radeon graphics cards over driver issues’ we discussed how a portion of Navi-based Radeon owners have been suffering from black screen and other instability issues. We haven’t gone through this, but many gamers have. This is a real shame considering GPUs like the Radeon RX 5700 series tend to provide killer value.
The latest Radeon Adrenaline 20.2.2 drivers are all about addressing these with extensive patch notes that will hopefully minimize the problems for Radeon RX 5500, 5600 and 5700 series owners. Highlights in the fixed bugs section include:

Performing a task switch with some Radeon Software features enabled or some third-party applications with hardware acceleration running in the background may cause a system hang or black screen.
Improvements have been made that allow for more responsive fan ramp up or fan ramp down times on Radeon RX 5700 series graphics products.
When Instant Replay is enabled, a TDR or black screen may occur when launching games or applications.
A black screen may occur when toggling HDR on in the game settings of Battlefield V.
The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt may experience an application hang or black screen during certain parts of the game or intermittently during gameplay.
Some video content in Chrome may appear as a black screen or be unresponsive on Radeon RX 5000 series graphics products when hardware acceleration is enabled.

Those have been sorted out on the new 20.2.2 drivers though AMD acknowledges in the release notes that “some users may still experience black screen or system hang issues during extended periods of gameplay,” and they’re actively working to detect and fix those.
Typically we like to give both AMD and Nvidia a few months to iron out bugs when releasing a new GPU series, especially when they’re based on a new architecture, as was the case with Turing and Navi. Nvidia went through a fair share of teething issues with Turing, but they went on top of most major issues quickly. AMD, on the other hand, has had several months to sort out Navi and this is coming way too late, which will no doubt bite them back.
As discussed recently, we haven’t run into any major issues after countless hours of testing new Radeon GPUs in our labs, but one useful piece of advice that has saved us from having to troubleshoot software glitches is to use the Display Driver Uninstaller tool (DDU) to remove previous driver installations before installing updated drivers.

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How to manage your family’s screen time | Life and style – Blog – 10 minute

Screens have no direct toxic effect on children. So it is perfectly fine, for example, to reward them with screens once they have done their homework. It is more a question of what it is displacing. Ask yourself: is everybody’s screen time under control? Also ask if it is interfering with other social interactions; perhaps activities you may want to do as a family? If it is, then think about reducing it.
Have a plan and stick to it, so that everybody understands when they’re allowed screen time and when they should stop. Think about your own media use, as it is important that everyone, including the adults in the home, adhere to these agreed boundaries. For instance, if you’ve decided as a family that you won’t have any screens at the dinner table, you all have to abide by that.
Prioritising face-to-face interaction, especially before children go to sleep, can make bedtime easier, as they tend to feel more relaxed.
If the child is displaying defiant behaviour around screens by, for example, refusing to stop watching and come to dinner, that points to a wider parenting issue of applying boundaries.
Dr Max Davie is an officer for health improvement at the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health.

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Apple does not ‘let bad guys use iPhones on screen’ | Technology – Blog – 10 minute

Film director Rian Johnson has lifted the lid on a secret in the world of product placement – Apple will not allow its kit to be used by a villainous character on screen.
“Apple, they let you use iPhones in movies, but – and this is very pivotal – if you’re ever watching a mystery movie, bad guys cannot have iPhones on camera,” Johnson, whose credits include Star Wars: The Last Jedi, Looper and Knives Out, revealed in a video recorded for Vanity Fair.
Johnson let the secret slip as he took viewers through an anatomy of a scene in Knives Out, a whodunnit with an ensemble cast including Daniel Craig, Toni Collette and Jamie Lee Curtis.
In the pivotal scene, the will reading following the murder of a rich novelist played by Christopher Plummer, Lee Curtis’s character, Linda Drysdale, is seen holding an iPhone – prompting Johnson to give away the industry secret.
“Every single film-maker who has a bad guy in their movie that’s supposed to be a secret wants to murder me right now,” Johnson added.
Apple has long cultivated an immaculate brand image and strictly controls how its products are used on the big and small screen. An article from Wired as long ago as 2002 pointed out that all the good guys in the long-running thriller 24 use Macs, while all the villains were seen using Windows PCs.
Guidelines advise that Apple phones, computers and other kit bearing the trademark should be seen “in the best light, in a manner or context that reflects favourably on the Apple products and on Apple Inc”, according to the site MacRumors.
Despite the stringent stipulations, Apple manages to maintain its position as a market leader with lavish exposure on both the big and small screen. The brand tracker Concave named it the top-ranking brand in films in 2018, and one that “appears in one form or another in most TV shows that take place in the modern world”.
Concave clocked up over 13 minutes of airtime for Apple in the second season of Big Little Lies, HBO’s high-end drama starring Nicole Kidman, Reese Witherspoon and Meryl Streep. Branded phones, laptops, tablets, computers and a smartwatch were all seen in the series.
Apple is far from alone in attempting to dictate the types of content and characters brands are willing to be associated with.
“All brands have stipulations for how they want to be used and seen on screen,” says Darryl Collis, director of product placement specialists Seesaw Media. “It is common for some brands not to want to be associated with a bad guy, or for an alcohol or car brand not to want be linked with characters being drunk or involving crashes.”
Analysts PQ Media estimate that product placement revenue hit $11.44bn last year as brands shelled out rich sums to reach audiences, but even Hollywood blockbusters can prove taboo for some image-conscious companies.
Danny Boyle’s 2008 hit Slumdog Millionaire swept all before it, winning eight Academy Awards, but Coca-Cola and Mercedes wanted nothing to do with the rags-to-riches story of a boy from the slums. The movie’s producers didn’t ask for permission to use the brands in the film, and when they did later, the companies bristled at how they were depicted.
In one scene, a criminal gang entices the lead actor, Dev Patel, and his brother with ice-cold Cokes in the hot Indian weather. “We used Coca-Cola bottles on the day of shooting, and we had to paint out the Coca-Cola label [later],” said Boyle in an interview.
In the case of Mercedes, Boyle said the car company was not averse to being in the hit film, just to being associated with poverty. “There is a Mercedes in the other part of the film, in a really nice, posh housing section,” he said. “They’re quite happy about [the Mercedes] being seen there, but they didn’t want it seen driving round the slum,” he said.
Daniel Craig reportedly spurned a $50m deal that would have seen James Bond using a Samsung phone in 2015 outing Spectre because he did not consider it good enough for 007. An $18m offer from Sony was also turned down by Craig and director Sam Mendes.

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