Top 4 Most Trending Stories – Week in Review – Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

As this week comes to a close we take a look at the articles that resonated most with our readers.
From an interview with the head of information security from Kaspersky and Google dropping another of their worldwide initiatives to Microsoft’s crippling Windows 10 update blunders and the massive information hack at Nedbank.
Here’s a quick look at this week’s top articles:
4. Google Quickly Drops Out of Free WiFi Initiative in South Africa
Google Station, an initiative from Google with the goal of providing free, fast WiFi to underdeveloped areas and those previously disenfranchised was dropped by Google at their Cape Town hot-spot.
3. INTERVIEW: The future of work in cybersecurity
There is a massive shortage of talent in the cybersecurity workforce with a gap of three million positions standing idle and open.
ITNA’s Jenna Delport spoke with Andrey Evdokimov, the Head of Information Security at Kaspersky, who believes that this gap isn’t due to lack of talent or education, but rather it is due to the fact that a lot of the roles that need new talent are in areas that remain unseen and therefore under-employed.
2. Microsoft Warns of Windows 10 Updates that Crash Systems, Delete User Data
Microsoft has released an update to Windows 10 that causes freezing and crashing of PCs.
The tech giant quickly pulled the patch before it could do any further damage. Microsoft has a history of shoddy patches that ruin the PCs of users, even going as far as deleting all of their data.
1. The Nedbank Data Breach – New Details Via CEO
Previous to this article, we covered the Nedbank data hacks initial discovery and reaction.
Mike Brown, CEO of Nedbank, says the company has done everything in its power to mitigate the damage from this hack but still warns clients to beware of cybercriminals using their information to masquerade as the bank itself or other companies in an effort to steal their money.
Compiled by Luis Monzon
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10minutemail review all around the world – Blog – 10 minute

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Samsung Galaxy Z Flip review: back to the folding flip phone future | Technology – Blog – 10 minute

Samsung Galaxy Z Flip review: back to the folding flip phone future | Technology – Blog – Tempemail.co

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It’s not often something comes along to genuinely change the game, but the Samsung Galaxy Z Flip does just that, bringing foldable displays closer to the mainstream and reinventing the flip phone for 2020 in the process.
Screens that literally fold in half finally arrived last year with the Galaxy Fold, which was originally plagued by durability issues causing a delay and a reworking of the device.
The £1,300 Galaxy Z Flip is therefore Samsung’s crucial second bite at the cherry. And it’s a very impressive one at that.

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Opening and closing the Galaxy Z Flip is a smooth and addictive experience.
Instead of a tall smartphone opening out into a square tablet, the Galaxy Z Flip is a tall smartphone that folds in half like mid-2000s flip-phones. I won’t beat about the bush: folding and unfolding the Galaxy Z Flip is a tremendous experience.
The hinge opens and will hold the screen at any angle, similar to a laptop hinge. It’s smooth and reassuringly solid. What you can’t easily do is flip it open with one finger, but you probably shouldn’t even if you could because the screen is fairly fragile – more on that later.
Closed, the phone is a compact wedge shape with little rubber feet and magnets holding the two ends together. You’ll be able to fit it in most pockets, including the often useless-for-phones tiny pockets women are burdened with.

The cover screen shows the time and other useful bits when tapped. Photograph: Samuel Gibbs/The Guardian
There’s a small 1.1in oblong screen on the lid of the device adjacent to the main camera. It shows the time, the battery charge and a little notification dot if there’s something waiting for you. Double tap to light it up, swipe left for music controls and right for notification icons, which you can tap and see a little bit with scrolling text. It’s useful when you want it, but also easy to ignore, freeing you somewhat from the burden of notifications.
Open it out and the 6.7in is remarkable. It looks and feels just like one of Samsung’s regular super-sized smartphones, which is a very good thing, apart from one caveat: there’s a crease in the middle. You can feel it, and get a reflection on the screen and you can see it.

You can see the crease in light reflections on the screen, but is generally invisible when viewing bright content and videos. Photograph: Samuel Gibbs/The Guardian
What feels weird at first under your thumb immediately becomes normal. It’s more visible when the screen is black, which makes the Galaxy Z Flip the first phone that looks worse in dark mode. You can’t see it while browsing a white web page or similar.
The crease is one of the compromises of having a massive screen that rivals the very biggest smartphones available today, but that folds down into a small, pocketable package. I think it’s a worthy trade-off for now.
The power button doubles as a fast and accurate fingerprint scanner, mounted below the volume buttons on the upper half of the phone.
Durability concerns

The screen has T-shaped caps at the sides of the fold that help stop dirt getting in behind the display. Photograph: Samuel Gibbs/The Guardian
The screen works, looks great and the hinge feels sturdy. It’s rated for more than 200,000 folds, which is 100 openings a day for 5.5 years. It has nylon fibres in the hinge to literally sweep dust and dirt away as you open and close it, while the edges of the folding part have plastic T-shaped caps to try to block dirt from getting in that way.
But there’s a massive question mark over the screen’s durability. It comes with care instructions wrapped around it in the box, including advice not to press hard on the screen with hard objects, such as your fingernail; don’t fold something else in when closing the phone; the phone isn’t dust or water resistant; don’t put stickers or screen protectors on it; and keep the phone away from credit cards as it has magnets in it. You can’t say you haven’t been warned.
I was only given three working days to test the device and in that time it worked perfectly. Others haven’t been so lucky. Realistically you need at least several months of daily use to truly know if it will stand the test of time.

Hidden in the hinge is a set of nylon fibres that help stop dust getting into the back of the device. Photograph: Samuel Gibbs/The Guardian
Then there’s the scratch resistance of the glass screen: basically there isn’t any. It uses ultra-thin glass that can fold, which is remarkable, but it’s covered in a plastic layer and is so thin it’s easy to poke holes in. The screen is fairly well protected when closed, but it’s possible to get grit in between the two halves, while pushing hard with your fingernail could damage it.
Samsung is offering a one-time £99/$119 display repair service, but after that you’re looking at a hefty cost in the region of £400.
All in you have to treat it with the respect deserving of a £1,300 device, and even then you might run into trouble. If you’re at all blasé with the way you treat your smartphone, this isn’t for you.
Specifications

Main screen: 6.7in FHD+ AMOLED Infinity Flex Display (425ppi)

Cover screen: 1.1in AMOLED (303ppi)

Processor: Qualcomm Snapdragon 855+

RAM: 8GB of RAM

Storage: 256GB (UFS 3.0)

Operating system: One UI 2.1 based on Android 10

Camera: dual rear camera: 12MP wide angle, 12MP ultra-wide angle, 10MP front-facing camera

Connectivity: 4G, nano sim + esim, Wi-Fiac, NFC, Bluetooth 5 and GPS

Folded dimensions: 87.4 x 73.6 x 17.3-15.4mm

Unfolded dimensions: 167.3 x 73.6 x 7.2-6.9mm

Weight: 183g

Solid performance, about a day’s battery

Other than wireless charging, the Galaxy Z Flip uses USB-C power just like any other modern Android phone. Photograph: Samuel Gibbs/The Guardian
The Galaxy Z Flip has Qualcomm’s top-of-the-range chip from late 2020, the Snapdragon 855+, not this year’s top chip, the Snapdragon 865. It also has 8GB of RAM and 256GB of storage, which isn’t expandable with microSD.
Performance all-round was good. Snappy, fast and smooth, similar to the Galaxy Note 10+, but not as rapid as the best, the OnePlus 7T Pro despite having the same chipset. If you’re into hardcore mobile gaming this isn’t the phone for you.
Battery life was solid but not quite up to the standards set by the very best last year. The Galaxy Z Flip lasted about 27 hours between charges of medium to heavy usage.
That was while using the phone as my primary device, lots of email, messages and push notifications, a couple of hours browsing, five hours of Spotify via Bluetooth headphones, 45 minutes of Netflix and about 10 photos.
The Galaxy Z Flip has relatively slow 15W charging, taking close to two hours for a full charge, but has wireless charging and wireless powersharing to wirelessly charge something else from the phone’s back, such as a set of earbuds or a smartwatch.
One UI 2

One UI 2 makes the most of the long screen, which together with improved gesture control makes it easier to manage. Photograph: Samuel Gibbs/The Guardian
Samsung’s version of Android 10 is called One UI 2, which itself is an evolution of One UI launched on the Galaxy S10 last year.
One UI 2 treats the phone’s screen differently to most other versions of Android. Broadly speaking the top half is for displaying information, while the bottom half is used for bits you have to touch and interact with. It’s a clever use of space helping you reach the bits you have to tap (with the exception of the notification bar), which is useful for a screen as long as the Galaxy Z Flip’s.
As too are Android 10’s gestures: swipe up from the bottom for recently used apps, or across the bottom to switch the last used apps. Swipe in from either side for back. It’s simple, fast and easy to use on big-screen phones.
Samsung has also made great strides in the speed of Android updates over recent years, bringing One UI 2 based on Android 10 as an update to the Galaxy S10 line in around three months from its release by Google.
Overall, One UI 2 is a pleasing form of Android to use, with useful additions and, importantly, the full Google suite of apps and services, from which competitor Huawei is barred from using due to US trade sanctions.
Camera

The standard, flat camera app is just one way of shooting photos with the Galaxy Z Flip. Photograph: Samuel Gibbs/The Guardian
The Galaxy Z Flip has two 12-megapixel cameras on the back, one normal and one ultra-wide, and one 10-megapixel selfie camera peeking through a small hole in the top of the screen.
The rear cameras are good but not class leading. The main camera shoots excellent pictures in good lighting, deals relatively well with high-contrast scenes with the addition of an HDR mode, but starts to struggle in middling light conditions. Images shot in the foyer of a theatre suffered from a bit of grain and noise.
Likewise, the camera doesn’t have the best low-light performance, although the automatic Night Mode helps. The ultrawide works great in good light, but the lack of a telephoto camera is disappointing.
The selfie camera is reasonable, shooting detailed images in good lighting, but again struggles in middling light, unexpectedly producing some blurry pictures. I got better results closing the phone, double-pressing the power button to bring up the main camera, which shows a small preview in the cover display.

Prop up the Galaxy Z Flip, turn on the selfie camera and shoot away showing the camera your hand to start a countdown timer, no awkward arm angles required. Photograph: Samuel Gibbs/The Guardian
Samsung’s camera app has a load of tricks. One of the most interesting is the “single take” mode. Press the shutter button and let it run until you think you have enough. The camera shoots photos, videos and produces gifs all at once, showing you a portfolio of content at the end from which you can pick and choose the best. If you’re not sure what will work best, this mode is for you.
You can also prop the phone up by closing it part way and use either the selfie camera or the main camera, which works as a makeshift tripod producing some interesting results.
Overall the Galaxy Z Flip is a fun camera to use, but won’t win any awards. It’s good enough, just not the best – but that’s not what you’re paying for here.
Observations

Video is best watched with the screen flat, but you can prop up the phone with a slight bend for watching hands-free on a table or desk. Photograph: Samuel Gibbs/The Guardian

The Galaxy Z Flip is not water or dust resistant at all, in contrast to most modern smartphones

There’s no headphone socket

You can feel a dip in the screen where the selfie camera pokes through

There’s just one speaker in the bottom of the phone

The glass backs have small gaps between them and the frame of the phone that trap dust and hairs

Call quality was excellent on both ends of the call on EE’s 4G network

Price
The Samsung Galaxy Z Flip costs £1,300 and is available in either black or purple.
A special colour version is available as part of the Thom Browne Edition, which includes Galaxy Buds+, a Galaxy Watch Active2 and other parts for £2,280.
For comparison, the Galaxy Fold costs £1,900 and the Motorola Razr is available exclusively through EE on plans starting at £94 a month. Samsung’s non-folding Galaxy Note 10+ costs £999.
Verdict
The Samsung Galaxy Z Flip is a tantalising, desirable look at one possible future of the smartphone.
A big phone that folds into a compact square is surprisingly pleasing to use, much easier to pocket and has the side benefit of adding a bit of distance between you and your phone. Unfolding it and unlocking it is much more of a deliberate act than it is to glance at a traditional flat phone, potentially helping you avoid notification overload.
It looks great, makes you stand out and feels solid, like the premium, cutting-edge product that it is. It’s exciting, different and delightfully tactile. But only having had three working days with it, I just can’t tell you whether it’ll go the distance. Months of daily use is the only thing that will really test the Galaxy Z Flip’s durability.
Buy the £1,300 Galaxy Z Flip if you want something different, but only if you can stomach the uncertainty surrounding its durability. You might get three years of problem-free use out of it, but then you might not. Only time will tell. But looking at the sea of boring metal and glass slabs, many of which are similar in price to the Galaxy Z Flip, I want one, and maybe you do too.

Pros: a screen that folds in half, big screen made pocketable, stands on its own, good camera, day+ battery life, exciting and different, One UI 2, good gestures, wireless charging and powersharing, nano sim and esim
Cons: durability unknowns, no dust or water resistance, high cost, no headphone socket, no telephoto camera, no expandable storage

The power button doubles as a fast and accurate fingerprint scanner, which is better than Samsung’s ultrasonic in-display scanners in last year’s S10 and Note 10 phones. Photograph: Samuel Gibbs/The Guardian
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Unilever instigates strategic review of health and beauty brands to rekindle growth- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

Unilever has launched a year-long strategic review of its health and beauty brands as the consumer goods giant seeks to maximise the growth of its beauty arm.
The in-depth review will concentrate on poor performing brands in the group’s portfolio. Analysts have suggested that ranges like Suave and Simple, which have languished in the shadow of blockbuster products such as Dermalogica and Axe (Lynx in the UK), could face the axe.
Unilever reported sales of £18.2bn last year accruing from its beauty and personal care brands such as Alberto Balsam and Vaseline, equivalent to 42% of the group’s total.
The beauty review, first reported by The Sunday Times, follows an earlier decision to potentially offload its tea business, including familiar names such as Lipton & PG Tips.
In a June 2019 interview with Tempemail Unilever’s chief exec Alan Jope said he would be ruthless in disposing of brands which “… don’t stand for something” to in order to place purpose at the hear of its business.
More recently this policy was evidenced by a decision to cease advertising food and beverage products to children under the age of 12.

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We Review Amazon’s Best Selling Monitor: the Acer SB220Q 21.5″ is just $90 – Blog – 10 minute

We went out looking for Amazon’s most popular monitor and what we discovered was Acer’s SB220Q 1080p 75Hz IPS display. This monitor tops both the best selling and the most wished for monitors list, so that’d seem to indicate not only are customers buying this monitor, but they actually want it in significant numbers.
Another key indicator that caught our attention were user reviews. There are over 4,000 of them, giving it a 4.6 star average which is solid, so we’ll have to see how it holds up in our testing.

Clearly one of the reasons why the SB220Q is so popular comes down to that price tag. $90 is very cheap for a monitor and it’s hard to find many cheaper than this. Once you start hitting $70 or even $80 you start limiting yourself to sub-1080p options and plenty of outdated rubbish. So if you’ve just built a PC and you have nothing left in your budget, grabbing one of the cheapest 1080p displays on Amazon seems like something a lot of people are doing.
On paper, the specs also make this an enticing buy below $100. We’re looking at a 22-inch 1080p IPS panel with a 75 Hz refresh rate. Now if you’ve been following our monitor reviews, this is not in the same realm as the usual 1080p and 1440p 144Hz stuff we look at. But we think what Acer is offering is still impressive for the price.

This is an IPS panel, not TN, and TNs are usually the most affordable monitor category. On top of that, we do get a slight bump up in refresh rate from baseline 60 Hz to 75Hz. A few little extras here and there can go a long way to making an entry-level monitor stand out from the pack.
That said, 22-inches, or more accurately 21.5 inches, is small for a monitor. Even 24 or 25-inch displays feel like a substantial upgrade in panel size. Something 24.5-inches ends up nearly 30% larger, so this is one of the more significant trade-offs to bring the price down. We looked around just in case and you can’t find a 24-inch IPS display for less than $100.

With that said, the Acer SB220Q does feature adaptive sync support, but it only comes with a single HDMI port (alongside VGA). That means adaptive sync is only usable with AMD GPUs since Nvidia’s current-gen products don’t support adaptive sync over HDMI. The adaptive sync implementation isn’t great either: with just a 75 Hz maximum refresh and 48 Hz minimum, there’s no low framerate compensation. This means as soon as your frame rate drops below 48 FPS, adaptive sync disengages and you’ll start seeing tearing or stuttering depending on your Vsync settings.
It’s not a great experience to fluctuate in and out of the adaptive sync window, it can be quite jarring. So having a graphics card capable of consistent 1080p 60 fps gameplay is going to be key. Not everyone buying a $90 monitor is going to fall into that category, if you have an RX 560, for example, you might struggle. On the other hand, these sorts of adaptive sync issues are present with almost all sub-100Hz displays, so it is not a unique problem to the SB220Q.

Oh, and the SB220Q is the first monitor we’ve tested in a long time that only comes with a VGA cable in the box. HDMI cable sold separately. Given graphics cards ditched VGA around a decade ago, is the target for this cable choice those with ancient laptops or PCs?
In terms of build quality, the Acer SB220Q is basic as expected. The stand is almost entirely plastic, it’s surprisingly solid and overall the display is very thin, but this is a cheap design and build. Unspectacular plastic, average bezel size, and very limited adjustability. The stand only supports tilt adjustment, and because of the small display size, without height adjustability it sits very low on your desk. Most people will need to raise this up a good 10 to 20 centimeters for ergonomic viewing, and you can’t do that with a VESA arm, as there’s no mount. We don’t expect budget monitors to feature a height adjustable stand, but not having a VESA mount is a bit of a stinger and really limits this monitor’s usability.

There’s no directional toggle for controlling the on-screen display, but we’ll do with with face buttons. On a positive note, Acer hasn’t skimped on the OSD, there’s plenty of settings in line with most of their other budget monitors, so we still get stuff like blue light filters and cheat crosshairs. There are also several overdrive settings, unlike some other budget monitors we’ve reviewed that completely neglect the feature.
Display Performance
Response Times / Overdrive Modes
Speaking of overdrive modes… let’s take a look at response time performance. Ther are three avialable modes: Normal is the default, there’s also Off and Extreme. Off is very slow, we’re facing a 16.24ms grey to grey average which is typical of entry-level 1080p IPS panels without overdrive. Ghosting is significant using this mode, with long smear trails following moving objects. Only 27% of transitions come close to meeting the lengthy 13.33ms refresh window, so this mode simply isn’t fast enough and wouldn’t be great at 60Hz either.
Acer SB220Q – Overdrive Off (75 Hz)

Normal takes things the other way, now we have a 6.40ms grey to grey average which is decent for an IPS monitor, and allows the SB220Q to achieve 100% refresh rate compliance. However, this has come at the expense of overshoot, and quite a significant amount of overshoot. An average error rate of 14.6% is high, and around half of all transitions experience inverse ghosting. Plenty of transitions are above 25% overshoot, which is noticeable.
Acer SB220Q – Overdrive Normal (75 Hz)

The extreme mode is worse. It does push the grey to grey average up to 3.77ms, but overshoot becomes overwhelming, leading to huge bright halos around moving objects. This mode is unusable.
Acer SB220Q – Overdrive Extreme (75 Hz)

Unfortunately, when you look across these three modes neither is particularly good. In fact, we’d call Off and Normal ‘bad’ overdrive modes, and Extreme is terrible. So we’re left with a predicament: is it better to have 16ms transitions with no overshoot, or 6ms transitions with substantial overshoot? Neither is ideal, but this is what Acer presents us here.
When we look at pursuit camera footage using Blur Buster’s UFO Test, which simulates how the human eye sees motion on this display, you can see this in action and how neither Off nor Normal deliver a great experience. Off is very slow with huge amounts of ghosting and smearing, with trails behind the moving UFO. But then with Normal, these ghost trails are replaced with inverse ghosting, a bright trail that in some circumstances is more noticeable than the blur trail.

We’d probably slightly prefer the Normal mode with inverse ghosting, we think motion clarity is somewhat better but we’re choosing between two bad options.
The monitor is not any better at 60 Hz — rather performance is worse at 60 Hz than it is at 75 Hz with even greater levels of overshoot. It is a budget monitor, so we guess we can’t expect more, but motion handling is definitely not one of this monitor’s strong points.
Acer SB220Q – Overdrive Normal (60 Hz)

How does the SB220Q compare to other 1080p monitors we’ve tested? Well, in terms of grey to grey average using the Normal overdrive mode, 6.40ms is not too bad for an IPS monitor. We get decent dark level performance, beating some other cheap VA options like the Pixio PCX243, for example. Response time compliance using this mode is also fine, as you’d hope with a 75Hz refresh rate.

But it’s with error rates that everything falls apart for the SB220Q. An average error of 14.6% is the highest we’ve tested among 1080p monitors, most of which sit more in the 0 to 4% range using their optimal overdrive modes. This gets even worse when looking at inverse ghosting: 46% of transitions suffering from the issue is way higher than most 1080p monitors, to the point where inverse ghosting is more obvious than with any other monitor on this list.

Let’s run through some options here. The Viotek GN24C is a VA panel we’ve quite often recommended in the budget category, being 1080p 144Hz, and it puts up a 5ms grey to grey average with 5% inverse ghosting and similar dark level performance. That is significantly better motion handling than you get with the Acer SB220Q.

Another more recent addition is the Pixio PXC243, which has almost no inverse ghosting but suffers from a slower grey to grey average around 7.5ms. In other words, it’s about 1ms slower than the SB220Q, but completely eliminates the inverse ghosting trails, all with a VA panel. It too has significantly better motion handling, and of course we can see other options here too from AOC, LG and others.

Most of these other monitors are more expensive, around the $150 mark, so it makes sense they would perform better. But we’re just not sure the SB220Q is delivering a great bang for buck experience with this sort of performance.

60 Hz performance is okay in terms of response times, but does suffer from severe inverse ghosting.

Input lag is typical of a budget monitor, we’re seeing a processing delay around 3.5ms, a slow refresh rate and modest response times, so this isn’t delivering a low lag experience. Getting a 144Hz panel instead would go a long way to lowering input lag but again, they’re more expensive.

Power consumption is low at around 16W, although not that much lower than some 24” monitors we’ve tested. Still, if heat output is a concern, the SB220Q is golden in this area.
At this point we’ve established the Acer SB220Q isn’t very good as a gaming monitor, how about as a general office type monitor or just something for web browsing? This is where color performance is much more important, so let’s dive right in…
Color Performance
Out of the box calibration is decent, which is welcome news for buyers after a great color experience. Our unit had near-perfect white levels, and while this did fall off slightly when moving through the rest of the greyscale with a minor yellow tint, it wasn’t that noticeable and far exceeded my expectations from a dirt cheap monitor. A greyscale deltaE of 2.45 isn’t perfectly accurate, but very good in this price category.
Default Color Performance
Acer SB220Q sRGB, tested at native resolution, highest refresh ratePortrait CALMAN Ultimate, DeltaE Value Target: Below 2.0, CCT Target: 6500K
Grayscale, Saturation and ColorChecker

Saturation performance is similar with a deltaE average of 2.48, mostly limited by some oddities with reds and greens. The panel used here can’t quite hit 100% sRGB coverage, we’re more at 93% so there is a bit of clipping with greens, but overall performance is solid even though we end up with a 3.39 deltaE average in ColorChecker.
Calibrated Color Performance
Acer SB220Q sRGB, tested at native resolution, highest refresh ratePortrait CALMAN Ultimate, DeltaE Value Target: Below 2.0, CCT Target: 6500K
Grayscale, Saturation and ColorChecker

There isn’t much that can be done to improve things using the OSD controls given the white point is already quite good, so the next step is a full calibration. As usual, this resolves most of our issues with this display’s factory performance, tightening us up to a below 1.0 deltaE average across the board. It’s not perfect, again we run into clipping issues with green and cyan, so we wouldn’t recommend this display for color critical work, but for a sub-$100 display this can deliver great color performance.

Brightness from the SB220Q is mediocre at 240 nits after calibration, although not too far away from most budget monitors. This is still bright enough for most use cases but if you have a really bright viewing environment like a sunny room, this might not be enough.

Contrast ratio is mediocre. Not surprising given it’s a cheap IPS panel but 882:1 puts it in the bottom rungs of our charts and generally this is low for an IPS. If you want better black levels and contrast ratio, you’ll have to fork out for a VA display. It’s also worth pointing out this is a native 6-bit panel that achieves 8-bit through FRC, so color banding with gradients is a little more noticeable here than with a true 6-bit display.
Viewing angles are excellent and the coating handles reflections well, so despite not having the most punchy blacks, the viewing experience here for colors we think is quite good. If you’re doing some office work, watching a few YouTube videos and so forth, it’s hard to complain about what the SB220Q delivers.

Uniformity is good as well. Not the best we’ve seen but the central area is well under control. There was a bit of fall off in the top left and bottom right of my retail unit, and there was also a small amount of IPS glow noticeable in darker viewing environments, but nothing too terrible.
Wrap Up
By now you should have a pretty good idea of how the Acer SB220Q performs as a sub-$100 monitor. We haven’t reviewed a ton of monitors in this price category despite how popular they are, but here are some final thoughts and comparisons based on what we’d expect from an entry-level product.
To reach this kind of price point, clearly lots of compromises had to be made. Outside of panel performance, the small 21.5-inch size and lack of VESA mount immediately jump out as trade-offs, along with the dull design all-round. But these are common areas where we’d expect costs to be cut and honestly, for a lot of use cases it’s not a big deal.

In terms of actual panel performance, we think the Acer SB220Q is perfectly fine for basic viewing, office tasks, productivity, video playback and those kind of tasks. We’re getting good factory calibration with a very solid white point. There’s no obvious tint and that makes it great for document editing and web browsing, which is still dominated by expansive white areas. Combine that with excellent viewing angles and acceptable uniformity, and yes, for a $90 monitor we’re impressed with the colors.
As was to be expected, the SB220Q is not good for gaming. If you were fooled by the 75Hz refresh rate and adaptive sync at the dirt cheap price point, unfortunately none of the overdrive modes are good, leaving us with either bad levels of smearing or bad levels of inverse ghosting. This is an ultra-affordable low-end IPS panel with slow response times. And to its credit, it’s probably not that different to other 60 to 75 Hz IPS monitors around the same price.
With today’s low prices for 144Hz 1080p monitors, we don’t think the SB220Q delivers a lot of bang for buck as a gaming display. The Viotek GN24C, PXC243 and AOC C24G1 are all $140 to $160. That’s ~60% more expensive than the SB220Q, but what you get is at least twice as fast and twice as good at motion handling.

But of course, $90 vs $150 for a lot of buyers is comparing apple to oranges. For around $90 we can’t see many better options than the SB220Q.
We feel this situation is somewhat similar to low-end graphics cards. The value isn’t quite there with the absolute cheapest GPUs, and you’re better off moving one tier up where you get significant improvements. Those 144Hz monitors are such great value right now that our recommendation for entry-level gaming monitors is going to stay with them, but for simpler web browsing, office productivity, YouTube, watching movies, maybe you want it as a second monitor, it’s really not bad for $90.
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Bowers & Wilkins PX7 review: Bose-beating noise-cancelling headphones | Technology – Blog – 10 minute

The PX7 are the latest flagship noise-cancelling headphones from upmarket British manufacturer Bowers & Wilkins, which excel on sound while giving Bose a real run for its money.
B&W have long made excellent headphones. Its first noise-cancelling headphones looked and sounded great, but weren’t comfortable. The £350 PX7’s redesigned earcups fix that problem while offering Bose-rivalling noise cancelling and exquisite sound.
Distinctive design

The curved arm and metallic oval with Bowers & Wilkins logo stand out in a crowd. Photograph: Samuel Gibbs/The Guardian
B&W’s headphone design stands out compared to most others with the company’s distinctive mix of single-arm earcup mounts, fabric covers and large brushed-metal trims.
The PX7 are large, over-ear headphones but they manage their 310g weight and bulk well, not feeling too heavy or cumbersome on the head. The earcups are big, with plush cushions that sit firmly but comfortably on the side of your head. The headband is lined with the same soft leatherette as the earcups and sits comfortably on your dome and doesn’t slip around on your hair.
The headband is long and protrudes with the arms wider than the ear cups, making the headphones look big on your head. Wearing them is therefore a bit of a statement compared with something more subtle such as the Bose QC35 II.
The earcups rotate to flat for storage, but not into a more compact alignment with the cups together, which makes them fairly large to put into a bag.
Specifications

Weight: 310g

Drivers: 43.6mm

Connectivity: Bluetooth 5.0, USB-C charging and audio, 3.5mm headphones socket

Bluetooth codecs: SBC, AAC, aptX, aptX HD, aptX Adaptive

Battery life: 30 hours

Controls and connectivity

The playback controls, USB-C and headphones ports are on the right earcup leaving just the noise-cancelling button on the left. Photograph: Samuel Gibbs/The Guardian
The left earcup has a multi-function button that controls noise cancelling. Press it to cycle between automatic, low, high and noise cancelling off. Press and hold it to activate an excellent, customisable ambient mode for listening out for announcements.
The right earcup has a USB-C charging port, a 3.5mm analogue socket, three buttons for controlling playback, track skip and volume, plus a sliding switch for turning the headphones on or off and activating pairing.
The buttons are excellent, with a clear metallic-sounding click when you’ve successfully activated them. The earcups also have presence sensors. Lift one or take off the headphones and the music pauses and resumes when they’re replaced.

The Bowers & Wilkins app for Android and iOS handles settings, updates and allows you to manage which two devices are connected at any one time. Photograph: Samuel Gibbs/The Guardian
The PX7s are some of the most connected and future-proofed headphones money can buy – however you want to connect your device, these headphones will handle it.
For those that prefer the cabled approach, the standard 3.5mm audio socket is there, although you have to have the headphones powered on for it to work. The USB-C socket can also be used for audio with any computer, tablet or smartphone that supports USB-C audio output.
Bluetooth 5.0 caters for those that want to go wireless. They support the standard SBC and AAC audio codecs, plus Qualcomm’s latest aptX Adaptive Audio codecs, which is designed to solve lipsync and interference issues, while providing significantly higher quality audio. They are some of the first headphones to support the new standard, which is also backwards compatible with the older aptX and aptX HD available on practically every modern Android smartphone and Windows computer. Apple’s various devices are limited to AAC as their highest quality standard.
The PX7s can connect to two Bluetooth devices at once, which is handy for watching video on your computer or tablet while still being connected to your phone for calls. Connectivity to an iPhone 11 Pro, a OnePlus 7 Pro 5G or a Microsoft Surface Pro 6 was rock solid while no lipsync issues were visible on any video apps on an iPhone or Android device.
Active noise cancelling

Stick them on, turn up noise cancelling to high and block out the world while listening your music or watching a movie. Photograph: Samuel Gibbs/The Guardian
Bose has long been king of active noise-cancelling technology, which uses microphones to detect unwanted sound and cancels it out with the inverse sound waves projected from the headphone’s speakers.
The PX7 rival Bose in being able to all but eliminate the roar of the road or engine, do a very good job of reducing voice and other distractions common in the office or commute, and do so without affecting the the sound quality.
They also have a low and automatic mode. The low is only suitable for listening in a quiet space, or if you want some awareness of your surroundings. I ended up leaving them on maximum.
One area of weakness is in dealing with wind noise, which comes through the headphones loudly. Turning off the noise cancelling helped, but Bose’s Noise Cancelling Headphones 700 are unrivalled here.
Sound

The large, plush ear cups are comfortable for extended listening sessions, which given how good they sound is something you might actually want to do. Photograph: Samuel Gibbs/The Guardian
Simply put, the PX7 sound fantastic; they are the sort of multi-talented headphones that have you discovering new elements in well-worn tracks.
Feed them some high-energy electronica and you’re treated to punchy, well controlled bass, energetic mids and sparkling highs. They sound suitably raw for a full-blooded rendition of Nirvana’s Smells Like Teen Spirit, while you’ll practically be able to hear fingers on strings during Hotel California from the Eagles’ remastered Hell Freezes Over. They’re just at home playing something like Jupiter from Holst’s the Planets suite or Ella Fitzgerald’s classic Summertime too.
My only criticism is that to get the best out of them you have to give them a little bit of volume, but anything above one-third on your phone’s volume scale and you’re rocking.
Call quality was good, with the other end of the line clearly able to hear me even with background noise, which did leak in more than Bose or Sennheiser rivals but was managable.
Battery life

With 30 hours of battery life with everything going, the headphones last long enough for a round-the-world flights and then some. Photograph: Samuel Gibbs/The Guardian
The PX7s last for about 30 hours of wireless playback with noise cancelling active, which is long enough for about three weeks of commuting or more than enough for even the longest of flights. A 15-minute charge also provides up to around five hours of playback, should they need topping up, with a full charge taking around three hours.
The battery is rated for a minimum of 500 full charge cycles, after which capacity is likely to be reduced to 80%, but should still work fine. The battery can be replaced B&W under service. The earpads are user replaceable, costing £22 for a pair, while the headphones are generally repairable rather than disposable.
The PX7s do not contain any recycled material, but B&W does accept old units for recycling.
Observations

There is an occasional audible creak from the headphones’ frame when wearing them

USB-C audio works with Android smartphones, but not via a USB-C to Lightning cable with an iPhone

Price
The Bowers & Wilkins PX7 are available in dark grey or silver costing £349.99.
For comparison, the RRP for the Bose Noise Cancelling Headphones 700 is £349.95, QuietComfort 35 II is £300 (currently £280), Sony’s WH-1000XM3 cost £329, Beats Studio 3 Wireless cost £300, with cheaper models such as Lindy’s BNX-60 starting around £90.
Verdict
The new Bowers & Wilkins PX7 are a fantastic set of big, expensive headphones that are worth every penny.
Very few headphones manage to combine truly effective noise cancellation with exquisite sound, but that’s what we have here. The PX7 are some of the best-sounding headphones I’ve had the pleasure to listen to in a long time.
They’re also comfortable, stay put on your head, last a long time between charges and are future-proofed thanks to support for the very latest Bluetooth standards, codecs and both USB-C audio and a traditional 3.5mm analogue headphones cable. However you want to connect the PX7 to your devices they have you covered.
They aren’t quite perfect; only folding flat not together and being fairly heavy and large. They also struggle with wind noise and when the battery runs flat they won’t work at all, not even via cable.
But if you’re looking for a set of high-end wireless noise-cancelling headphones that also sound like they’re worth the premium you pay for them, the B&W PX7 should be at the top of your list.

Pros: fantastic sound, effective noise cancelling, long battery life, USB-C charging and audio, 3.5mm headphones, Bluetooth 5.0, atpX Adaptive, comfortable, stable
Cons: big, expensive, can’t be used via cable without power, only fold flat, struggle with wind noise

The arm holds the earcup evenly on your head with plenty of adjustment to get a comfortable fit. Photograph: Samuel Gibbs/The Guardian
Other reviews
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Antisocial: How Online Extremists Broke America by Andrew Marantz – review | Books- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

Andrew Marantz is a staff writer for the New Yorker, and a pretty good one. He’s written a lot of perceptive stuff about the tech industry in recent years. One morning in 2016, he was in his office exploring “a particularly foul part of social media undergrowth”, when the magazine’s editor, David Remnick, came in, looked at the screen and asked: “What the hell is that?” Marantz told him to sit down and watch.
He repeated some of the Facebook searches he’d been doing, bringing up toxic memes and propaganda posts and reading out the “engagement” statistics below each one: 5,000 shares here, 15,000 “Likes” there. Then he pulled up the New Yorker’s Facebook page. A recent landmark piece got just 87 shares; Remnick’s own piece about Aretha Franklin had even fewer – 78 shares. And so on. “I get it,” said the editor. “It’s not auspicious, but where’s the story in it?” Marantz pressed on, exploring the maze of pro-Trump propaganda and viral memes. “What if I could find the people who are peddling this stuff?” he asked. “That could be a story,” Remnick replied.
He was right, and this book tells that tale. To research it, Marantz frequented some of the nastiest circles of the American “alt-right”, got to know some of the home-grown virtuosos of disinformation and disruption, embedded himself in a startup that specialises in exploiting online “virality”, and reflected on the recent history of social media and its monetisation and amplification of hate, white supremacism and disinformation. His conclusions are not reassuring for anyone who regards a functioning public sphere and accountable media power as prerequisites for democracy.

Lee Atwater, ‘the Paganini of the modern political dog-whistle’, with George Bush in 1986. Photograph: Cynthia Johnson/The LIFE Images Collection via Getty Images
Early in the book, Marantz observes that “Trump seemed to draw on pools of dark energy not previously observed within the universe of the American electorate”. This supposed invisibility rather depends on historical amnesia. The white supremacism that manifested itself in 2016 has a long history, and not just in the deep south. Marantz himself traces its antecedents back to Lee Atwater – “the Paganini of the modern political dog-whistle” – who worked for the sainted Ronald Reagan and was deputy director of his re-election campaign. Atwater popularised the “southern strategy” of coded racism aimed at white voters in the deep south that turned many of them from Democrats to Republicans. (He later joined the lobbying firm co-founded by Paul Manafort and Roger Stone, names that have become familiar again since 2016.) Reagan’s communications director was Pat Buchanan, who developed “America first” from a blueprint established by Charles Lindbergh and his fellow Nazi admirers in the 1940s. And Reagan’s campaign motto? “Let’s make America great again.”
There has always been a dark undercurrent of white supremacism in some sectors of American culture. It was kept from public view for decades by the editorial gatekeepers of the old media ecosystem. But once the internet arrived, a sophisticated online culture of conspiracy theorists, racists and other malign discontents thrived in cyberspace. But it stayed below the radar until a fully paid-up conspiracy theorist won the Republican nomination. Trump’s candidacy and campaign had the effect of “mainstreaming” that which had previously been largely hidden from view. At which point, the innocent public began to see and experience what Marantz has closely observed, namely the remarkable capabilities of extremist “edgelords” to weaponise YouTube, Twitter and Facebook for destructive purposes.
One of the most depressing things about 2016 was the apparent inability of American journalism to deal with this pollution of the public sphere. In part, this was because they were crippled by their professional standards. It’s not always possible to be even-handed and honest. “The plain fact,” writes Marantz at one point, “was that the alt-right was a racist movement full of creeps and liars. If a newspaper’s house style didn’t allow its reporters to say so, then the house style was preventing its reporters from telling the truth.” Trump’s mastery of Twitter led the news agenda every day, faithfully followed by mainstream media, like beagles following a live trail. And his use of the “fake news” metaphor was masterly: a reminder of why, as Marantz points out, Lügenpresse – “lying press” – was also a favourite epithet of Joseph Goebbels.
At the end of this absorbing and disturbing book, we are left with two awkward questions. One is whether digital technology – as controlled and deployed by a small number of unregulated tech corporations that derive their profits from monetising “user engagement” (a polite term for prioritising dis- and misinformation, lies, outrage and nonsense) – now constitutes an existential threat to liberal democracy. And if the answer to that is yes, are we going to do anything about it before it’s too late? Second, was the old media ecosystem, with its elitist gatekeepers, editorial control, political bias and other flaws, really worse than what we have acquired? Or, pace Winston Churchill on democracy, was it just the worst system apart from all the others?
• Antisocial: How Online Extremists Broke America by Andrew Marantz is published by Picador (£20). To order a copy go to guardianbookshop.com. Free UK p&p over £15

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Table Manners review – fun and frustrations of the dating game | Games – Blog – 10 minute

Ten minutes into my date with Taylor and I’ve spilled the champagne, smashed four glasses and slapped his cheek with uncooked lobster. The table is a blazing inferno (my attempt to light our votive candle was suboptimal). While I fumble with the fire extinguisher, Taylor stares at his phone, arms folded, and purses his lips. Moments like these transform Table Manners from a physics-based dating simulator into something approaching hilarious Mr Bean fan fiction.
Table Manners borrows the idea Bossa popularised with Surgeon Simulator by challenging players to complete a series of dexterous tasks via purposefully janky controls. Each level entails a visit to a series of increasingly whacky restaurants that play host to various romantic dates. Your partner makes demands – “Order us burgers … Refill my glass … Cook fondue” – and you have a limited time to realise their whims lest they slam down their fist and declare the date over.

Puckish commitment … Table Manners Photograph: Curve Digital
It’s a fun premise, made sharper by a puckish commitment to a conceit that pokes fun at modern dating conventions. To embark on a date you must first take out your mobile phone, boot up an an app called Blundr then wipe your gammon-finger across the face of a prospective suitor. But under all the beards, piercings and makeup, every date (whether male or female) has the same base character model – and this standardisation is jarring. Similarly, you can flirt with your date through the app, but everyone has identical pre-generated chat options.
In any other game this could seem lazy, but in Table Manners the superficiality is satirical. There’s always another near-identical suitor to take your date’s place at the table. In Table Manners you repeat the same dates with different people – steak, sushi, burgers – while in real life many of us bookmark classy-but-not-too-pricey haunts to revisit with other “first dates”.
But there are frustrations. While Table Manners’ slapstick controls are part of what makes the chaos fun, sometimes they swing from deliberately awkward to accidentally broken. Unscripted bugs cause mayhem: a bucket of chips attached itself to my hand and smashed into anything I tried to delicately grasp; the blow torch refused to detect the food I was trying to toast; a glass got stuck halfway inside a table mat and prevented burgers being served; I had to restart the game twice after the pointer couldn’t detect “home” on the menu after completing levels.

Meanwhile, as the table settings grew more complex the challenges became unfairly obscure. In an ice bar Taylor insisted, “my glass is empty!” but when I filled the glass on his placemat, the task remained incomplete. As it turned out, a metal cup balanced on the opposite edge of the table should have been filled instead. Upon returning home from the unsuccessful date, I logged in to chat with some other matches on Blundr. The pre-generated chat served the same joke twice within 10 seconds to one suitor, but whereas she hated it the first time round, the second made her laugh.
There’s a fine line between playfully obtuse instructions and infuriatingly vague game design. Being unable to complete a task because it’s challenging is one thing, but not knowing exactly what the task is (and being blocked from doing it by bugs) is another. Table Manners has a brilliant premise and provides incisively funny commentary on modern romance but, just like when a Tinder date doesn’t match their profile and then proceeds to behave inexplicably, sometimes you just want to make your excuses and leave.

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Top 4 Most Trending Stories – Week in Review – Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

As the week comes to a close we take a look at the stories that resonated most with our readers.
From gadget grading, Samsung v. Apple and quality control in networking to this year’s botched Mobile World Congress – here’s a quick look at this week’s top articles:
4. 3 Reasons Why Samsung’s Galaxy Buds+ Will Make you Completely Forget About Apple’s Airpods:
With the announcement of Samsung’s new flagship device, they likewise announced the release of their new Samsung Galaxy Buds+.
These new true wireless earbuds have three distinct and formidable advantages over their American rivals in Apple. Their batteries last exponentially longer, they are compatible with the iOS of iPhone 10 and up, and they are far cheaper.
3. ProLabs demonstrates commitment to quality control and compliance:
ProLabs, a global leader in optical networking infrastructure shows their complete investment in the quality of its networking components. To this end, they continue to quality test their products as far as possible.
ProLabs uses environments created for testing equipment known as Testbeds to simulate environments where certain devices are intended to work in, in order to test the device will meet quality standards.
2. Five critical elements for any cybersecurity awareness programme:
A recent report tells business owners that Android-based malware now represents 14% of all cyber threats. For business owners, protecting themselves from threats such as spyware, compromised applications, and even ransomware is of keen importance.
Steps such as being wary of public Wi-Fi and monitoring social media may save you a massive headache.

Sony and Amazon are the latest to ditch MWC 2020

With the Mobile World Congress now finally cancelled, the pulling out of Sony and Amazon could be seen as one of the first blows that truly crippled the meeting of the brands in Barcelona.
Sony, who often uses such events to reveal its most important mobile devices opted to use another method instead.
By Luis Monzon
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Court says Melbourne dentist can serve Google for user details over bad review | Technology – Blog – 10 minute

A Melbourne dentist has been given permission by the federal court to serve Google to attempt to find out the personal details of an anonymous account that left a bad review about his practice.
Dr Matthew Kabbabe, a dental surgeon in Northcote, is seeking to sue a user known only as CBsm 23 for defamation over a negative review of his business in which the user claimed the dentist made the experience “extremely awkward and uncomfortable” and the procedure was “a complete waste of time”.
Given the anonymity of the user, Kabbabe needed to apply to the federal court to serve Google in order to find out the personal information held on the user.
Kabbabe told the court in an affidavit that he had approached Google directly in November last year and asked for the review to be removed, but Google declined. Then earlier this month he asked Google for the information on the user.

He said Google responded by stating it would not remove the review and that it did “not have any means to investigate where and when the ID was created”.
On Wednesday, federal court justice Bernard Murphy gave leave to seek from Google a document that would contain the account’s subscriber information, name of users, the IP addresses that logged into the account, phone numbers, other metadata and other Google accounts that might have used the same IP address at a similar time as the review was left.
Kabbabe’s case is listed for a case management hearing on 25 March.
Guardian Australia has sought comment from Google.
It is the latest in an increasing number of defamation cases brought against Google and other online reviewer sites, which have been reluctant to remove bad reviews.
Google has argued that defamation threats can be used to suppress information that might help customers steer clear of bad businesses, and that it should only remove reviews with a court order.
It followed a judgment in the South Australian supreme court last week awarding $750,000 in damages to Adelaide barrister Gordon Cheng for an October 2018 review left in English and Chinese on Google, claiming Cheng gave “false and misleading advices”.
Cheng told the court he had lost around 80% of his business, and was subsequently diagnosed with depression. Google took down the review around two months after Cheng was first alerted to it, and six months after it was posted.

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