Evaluating Your Security Controls? Be Sure to Ask the Right Questions – Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

Testing security controls is the only way to know if they are truly defending your organization. With many different testing frameworks and tools to choose from, you have lots of options.
But what do you specifically want to know? And how are the findings relevant to the threat landscape you face at this moment?

“Decide what you want to know and then choose the best tool for the job.”

Security teams typically use several different testing tools to evaluate infrastructure. According to SANS, 69.9% of security teams use vendor-provided testing tools, 60.2% use pen-testing tools, and 59.7% use homegrown tools and scripts.
While vendor-provided tools test a specific security solution—whether it’s a web application firewall (WAF), EDR solution, or something else—pen testing is frequently used to verify that controls meet compliance requirements, such as PCI DSS regulations, and by red teams as part of broader testing assessments and exercises.
Automated pen tests help answer the question, “can an attacker get in?” They can help identify vulnerable or high-risk pathways into an environment, but they usually don’t cover the entire kill chain. They can emulate multiple threat actor techniques and even different payloads, but they typically don’t replicate and fully automate the full Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures (TTPs) of a real threat actor.
Automated pen tests rely on skilled human pen testers with varying levels of expertise, making it difficult to gain consistent data over time. The sheer variety of pen-testing tools and approaches can actually complicate testing. For example, different attack vectors require different testing tools. These tools also tend to be weak at recognizing vulnerabilities in business logic, which can skew results.
For organizations, pen testing is costly and requires significant advance planning, which often limits its use to annual or semi-annual testing. And even with automation, pen-testing takes time to scope, conduct, and analyze, slowing the organization’s ability to respond accurately to immediate threats.
The SANS poll found that most respondents test their controls quarterly at best. However, the real-world threat landscape evolves daily, leaving a lot of time for threats to exploit any gaps or weaknesses between scheduled assessments. If you want visibility into the effectiveness of security controls—right now—you’ll have additional questions that pen testing cannot easily answer:

Are your controls working as they are supposed to work, and as you expect?
Are interdependent controls correctly generating and delivering the right data? For example, are your web gateway, firewall, and behavior-based tools correctly alerting the SIEM when they detect suspicious activity?
Have configurations drifted over time or been set incorrectly? For instance, are controls actively detecting threats, or were they left in monitoring mode?
If you have rolled out new technology or settings, how have they affected your security posture?
Are controls able to defend against the newest threats and variants?
Does your security defend against the latest stealth techniques, such as living off the land (LOTL) fileless attacks by sophisticated attackers?
Do you have visibility into security outcomes that require both human processes and technology?
Is your blue team able to identify and respond effectively to alerts?

Automated Breach and Attack Simulation (BAS) tools enable you to answer these questions. BAS complements point-in-time testing to continually challenge, measure, and optimize the effectiveness of security controls. BAS is automated, allowing you to test as needed, and the best solutions assess controls based on the latest malware strains and threat actor TTPs—without having to assemble teams of security experts. Organizations are using BAS to:

Simulate attacks without jeopardizing production environments
Simulate attacks across the full kill chain against all threats, including the latest attacker TTPs
Test continuously with the flexibility to target specific vectors, infrastructure, and internal teams for awareness against the latest threats
Automate simulations for repeatability and consistency
Conduct testing at any time interval—hourly, daily, weekly, or ad hoc with results in minutes
Identify gaps and evaluate controls against the MITRE ATT&CK framework
Remediate security posture and the company’s exposure using actionable insights

When cyber adversaries continue to up their games, you and your executive team need assurance that controls across the kill chain are indeed delivering the protection you need—every day, every hour, or every moment. For a growing number of organizations, BAS is delivering the continuous security control and cyber risk assessment data needed to achieve that goal.
For more information, visit Cymulate and sign up for a free trial.

Tempemail , Tempmail Temp email addressess (10 minutes emails)– When you want to create account on some forum or social media, like Facebook, Reddit, Twitter, TikTok you have to enter information about your e-mail box to get an activation link. Unfortunately, after registration, this social media sends you dozens of messages with useless information, which you are not interested in. To avoid that, visit this Temp mail generator: tempemail.co and you will have a Temp mail disposable address and end up on a bunch of spam lists. This email will expire after 10 minute so you can call this Temp mail 10 minute email. Our service is free! Let’s enjoy!

Daniel Susskind: ‘Automation of jobs is one of the greatest questions of our time’ | Technology – Blog – 10 minute

Daniel Susskind is an economist and fellow of Balliol College, Oxford. He has held policy roles in the Blair and Cameron governments. His new book, A World Without Work, explores how society should respond to the increasing automation of employment.
This isn’t an unexplored topic, so why did you write this book? My view is that this is one of the greatest questions of our time. And in spite of everything that has been written, I didn’t feel like we had done the question justice. I don’t think we’re taking seriously this idea that there might not be enough well-paid work for everyone to do because of technological advances that are taking place.
Is that partly because of the way the question is framed, that “robots are stealing our jobs” when that’s not how these changes are happening? Yes. There are two mistakes there. One is the sort of anthropomorphisation of technology – these robots exist but they are often gimmicks. The technologies that are really very powerful don’t look, think or reason like us. The second mistake is to think of entire jobs being replaced. These technologies tend to displace people from tasks – what I call task encroachment.
Many of the boundaries economists and computer scientists developed in the second part of the 20th century for thinking about what machines could and couldn’t do have been crossed. For example, driving a car, making a medical diagnosis or identifying a bird from a fleeting glimpse. All these tasks can be accomplished by software now.
And machines are often performing these tasks using strategies that are new to humans?We thought many of these tasks would be difficult to automate because humans couldn’t articulate how they performed them. They relied on experience, intuition and gut reaction – so how could you write a set of instructions for a computer to follow? But by using lots of data and computing power, machines are creating new strategies.
In the light of this technological change, what career path would you advise a 16-year-old to follow? Very crudely, I’d say, there are two strategies: either you learn to be good at the sorts of things these systems and machines cannot do or you try to build the machines.
But forecasting which jobs and tasks will be automated is hard. Should people bother training to be doctors or lawyers when automation is already encroaching on these careers? For young professionals, perhaps somewhat counterintuitively, I say the best thing to do is pursue the traditional path. But be far more agnostic and open minded along the way about opportunities that come up. Because what’s interesting is that if you look at these technologies – take the systems developed by DeepMind or the ones that recognise melanomas by Sebastian Thrun’s team at Stanford – these teams contain lots of domain experts, such as trained doctors.
Technological unemployment appears be growing alongside rising inequality – is there a direct relationship between the two? Work is our traditional way of distributing income, so one of the great challenges of a world with less work is how we slice up the pie. The labour share of income is falling in many parts of the developed world.
Should robots be taxed and that money funnelled back to the victims of automation? There are various problems with this idea. What do we mean by a robot? A driverless car isn’t driven by an android. How do we do a robot headcount? We do need to tax capital, the owners – however that has a branding problem.
But the owners of the these technologies are often quite good at avoiding tax. If the trends in inequality continue, focusing on how we resolve that problem is going to become more pertinent.
You advance the idea of a “conditional” universal basic income. I think the challenge in a world with less work is how you maintain that sense of social solidarity. At the moment, that comes from a sense that everyone is paying into the collective economic pot through their taxes or, if they’re not in work, they are actively looking for work or training for work.
I think one of the problems of a universal basic income [a payment made to the entire population regardless of employment status] is that too many people take offence at the idea that you give something and don’t expect anything in return.
But perhaps we can introduce conditions to a UBI, for example that you undertake some valuable voluntary work in return. There are something like 15 million people doing a hugely valuable set of voluntary activities in the UK – why not recognise that? The UBI solves the distribution problem – how do you share income if the labour market doesn’t do it very well? – and if everyone is contributing, some in economic and others in non-economic ways, that may solve the we’re-all-in-it-together problem.

The challenge in a world with less work is how you maintain that sense of social solidarity

Volunteering requires empathy and hands-on skills that computers find hard and such activities are not rewarded very well. There is a paradox. Machines can’t do them and they tend to be unpaid by the market. There’s this huge gap between the social value of a lot of this work and the value that’s recognised in the market. So one of the reasons for optimism is that there’s an opportunity to potentially address that.
Work not only gives people income, but often gives meaning and identity. How can people get meaning from more leisure? If we think the relationship between work and meaning is very tight, the alternative might be not to think of this as being about the future of work, but the future of leisure. You know, we have labour-market policies to shape how people live their working lives. Maybe we also need leisure policies to shape how people spend their spare time. We already have a pension system that is a heavily subsidised leisure policy of sorts.
You’ve worked in government. Is automation a priority for politicians or are they reluctant to address things that may only pay off long after they have been voted out? Almost every government in the developed world has published some kind of AI strategy in the last few years. Whether or not they’re then following that strategy is less clear.
You have to explain that this is not a story about the future – this is happening now. Every day, we hear stories of these technologies, driving cars, making medical diagnoses, drafting legal documents, designing buildings – this is something that is happening now; it’s not in the future. It is closely linked to the inequalities we see emerging. It tends not to be acted upon because it’s thought to be something that doesn’t really matter, but it does.
• A World Without Work by Daniel Susskind is published by Allen Lane (£20). To order a copy go to guardianbookshop.com. Free UK p&p over £15

Tempemail , Tempmail Temp email addressess (10 minutes emails)– When you want to create account on some forum or social media, like Facebook, Reddit, Twitter, TikTok you have to enter information about your e-mail box to get an activation link. Unfortunately, after registration, this social media sends you dozens of messages with useless information, which you are not interested in. To avoid that, visit this Temp mail generator: tempemail.co and you will have a Temp mail disposable address and end up on a bunch of spam lists. This email will expire after 10 minute so you can call this Temp mail 10 minute email. Our service is free! Let’s enjoy!

10 questions with… Kris Robbens, marketing director GB&I of the Coca-Cola Company- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

To showcase the personalities of the people behind the media and marketing sector, Tempemail speaks to individuals who are bringing something a little different to the industry and talks to them about what insights and life experience they can offer the rest of us. This week’s 10 Questions are put to Kris Robbens, marketing director for Great Britain and Ireland at the Coca-Cola Company
What was your first-ever job?
I used to spend a lot of my summers bartending in my hometown in Belgium. It was a great experience because it gave me the opportunity to engage with people and different products firsthand, and that’s been invaluable ever since.
After that, my first office job was at Unilever in Belgium on a graduate programme. It was a brilliant set up, offering the chance to rotate through different functions from field sales to category, and brand management.
Which industry buzzword annoys you most?
They are terms that are used a lot and it’s the likes of ‘millennial’ or ‘gen z’. I studied social sciences, and whilst I understand that we need to simplify and manage audiences, I think it’s the least consumer-centric way to approach it, as instead it can miss individual differences and fail to grasp what we really have in common. I’ve always been wary of defining a generation based on an often broad, outside view, and instead, I think there are so many more interesting ways of defining
Who do you find most interesting to follow on social media?
Whilst I am on social media, I’m inspired more by wider elements. I listen to a lot of TED Talks and love the breadth of topics, conversations and opinions shared by so many people across different sectors. At a time when there is a lot of debate and uncertainty, it’s interesting to hear about different innovations and trends, and that stretches your mind to think positively, differently and creatively.
I’m also a big fan of Mindbullets by futureworld.org, a weekly publication of possible future scenarios. It really stretches your brain to think about the ‘what if’.
The highlight of your career (so far?)
The highlight has been experiencing the power of diversity of thought and how that has then delivered incredible ideas. I’m also very lucky to have such huge variety to my job. No two days at Coca-Cola are the same: I’ve had the opportunity to work in countries all over the world, meet and learn from different colleagues, and work with a range of amazing brands, each with their own unique identity. My biggest fear in my work life is being bored, and I count myself incredibly lucky that I have never been bored in my career.
What piece of tech can you not live without?
Besides my phone, noise cancellation headphones! I use them every day on the commute and for those necessary moments of reflection. I’m also learning Spanish, so I’m really enjoying Duolingo. It’s a brilliant app and the gamification element of it really supports learning in a fun and creative way.
Who or what did you have posters of on your bedroom wall as a teenager?
I’m really inspired by music and photography, so it was a total mix of the two. As well as featuring Bjork as a result of a love for her music, I also studied photography, so had posters of my favourites, particularly from Andreas Gursky, a German photographer. His work is all about challenging and changing perspectives, and creates what looks like a realistic image at first glance, but you realise it’s been manipulated, and you can look at it in so many different ways. It completely skews perspective and you could look at it for hours.
In advertising, what needs to change soon?
Everything and nothing. By truly being consumer-centric, you need to remain consistently open to the consumer’s changing mindset and therefore, change, flex and innovate with them. On the other hand, a brand is like a good friend. You buy into it in the first place and you need it to be consistent, reliable and available, whilst pleasantly challenging.
What is (in your opinion) the greatest film/album/book of your life?
I read Sapiens by Yuval Noah Harari earlier this year and I think about it every day. The book combines the beauty of nature and nurture, but stretches it to a whole new level of combining it with the likes of archaeology, history, and human sciences, to mix it together into a brief history of mankind. It’s mind-blowing.
Which industry event can you not afford to miss each year and why?
I recently attended The Marketing Society Awards as Coca-Cola received the Iconic Brand Award which is awarded to the most iconic brand of the past 60 years. It was a brilliant evening and we were very excited to have been awarded.
What’s the best piece of advice you have ever been given?
Start with the why, end with the why and ask why five times.
One of the lessons I learnt studying social sciences was that what consumers say isn’t always what they feel and mean – so data is important, but you also need to consider the “why” behind the numbers. For example, social norms and expectations might make people feel they ought to answer a question in a certain way, so understanding their motivations at the start, middle and end is the key to getting real consumer insight.

Tempemail , Tempmail Temp email addressess (10 minutes emails)– When you want to create account on some forum or social media, like Facebook, Reddit, Twitter, TikTok you have to enter information about your e-mail box to get an activation link. Unfortunately, after registration, this social media sends you dozens of messages with useless information, which you are not interested in. To avoid that, visit this Temp mail generator: tempemail.co and you will have a Temp mail disposable address and end up on a bunch of spam lists. This email will expire after 10 minute so you can call this Temp mail 10 minute email. Our service is free! Let’s enjoy!

10 questions with… Martin de Dreuille, vice-president of global marketing for Grey Goose- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

To showcase the personalities of the people behind the media and marketing sector, Tempemail speaks to individuals who are bringing something a little different to the industry and talks to them about what insights and life experience they can offer the rest of us. This week’s 10 Questions are put to Martin de Dreuille, vice-president of global marketing for Grey Goose.
What was your first-ever job?
I was a Hennessy brand ambassador for the US, based in NY. This is how I fell in love with the US and the spirits industry.
Which industry buzzword annoys you most?
I think nowadays hearing that our content is going to go viral is particularly irritating. It’s trying to get marketers to believe that they will reach millions of people, while it’s really a way to not commit to any KPIs because let’s face it, we have no clue about what’s going to go viral or not!
Who do you find most interesting to follow on social media?
You mean after Grey Goose of course? Gucci has done a fantastic job at rejuvenating the brand on their social media channels. They developed their own aesthetics, where you’re not sure if the pictures are generated by users or created by professionals. They show a high level of diversity of people, clothing and moments, making the brand more relatable and appropriate for any occasions or moments of the day. I have identified similar jobs to do on Grey Goose through the Live Victoriously platform, and Gucci is a source of inspiration.
Highlight of your career (so far?)
Joining Bacardi to lead Grey Goose in North America, then being promoted to global vice-president of the brand is certainly the highlight of my career so far. There is a handful of brands that are as desirable as Grey Goose in the world of spirits. Leading Grey Goose and having an opportunity to turn around its performance with the launch of a new platform Live Victoriously – which encourages consumers to treat themselves more often, no matter how big or small the occasion may be – surrounded by talented primos, is exhilarating.
What piece of tech can you not live without?
My Kindle. Reading is very important to me as a form of relaxation as well as for opening my horizons. I travel quite frequently and can’t always have a heavy book with me, but I can certainly carry a Kindle.
Who or what did you have posters of on your bedroom wall as a teenager?
It’s a tough question to answer while staying completely honest. I’m afraid I must admit I had a poster of an English pop singer named Samantha Fox (now I realize being bilingual in English that this is embarrassing). Easier to admit is a poster of a legendary horse named Jappeloup who won a gold medal in jumping in the 1988 Olympic games.
In advertising, what needs to change soon?
The biggest thing that needs to change is treating digital as its own marketing pillar. Digital is neither one dimensional nor a marketing program. Digital is present in every aspect of every marketing program. There is no such thing as traditional or digital media strategies anymore. There is now only one media strategy.
What is (in your opinion) the greatest film/album/book of your life?
I’ll pick the greatest film, which in my opinion is The Shining. I love it because it creates a very strong emotional reaction (and candidly, I have goosebumps writing about it now). Creating emotional connections is what I love about marketing, and what Live Victoriously aims to deliver to people.
Which industry event can you not afford to miss each year and why?
My favorite industry event is Tales of the Cocktail, the world’s premier trade conference that takes place annually in New Orleans and brings cocktail and spirits industry professionals together to highlight what’s trending and new in the spirits industry. Grey Goose works with top accounts and remarkable mixologists from all over the world, so it’s great to see everyone come together in one place to learn about what’s coming next. Vodka is such a versatile spirit that lends itself to a variety of cocktail trends, so I learn something new every year.
At last year’s event, Grey Goose launched our Great Bar Race initiative, which allows top mixologists from around the country to put their service skills to the test in a series of exciting challenges. Tied to this, we’ve created a first-of-its-kind grant in conjunction with the Tales of the Cocktail Foundation that will give back to organizations dedicated to advancing diversity and inclusion within the bartending industry.
What’s the best piece of advice you have ever been given?
I’ve historically needed a lot of detailed information before making a decision, which always led me to overthink and procrastinate. I was lucky enough to get a coach for six months, and he gave me the best piece of advice – trust your instinct. As I gained more experience, I realized the right balance of insight and instinct leads to the best decisions. As the senior vice-president of PepsiCo recently put it in an interview, “consumer research without intuition will deliver just mediocrity.”
See more entries of the 10 Questions With… series here.

Tempemail , Tempmail Temp email addressess (10 minutes emails)– When you want to create account on some forum or social media, like Facebook, Reddit, Twitter, TikTok you have to enter information about your e-mail box to get an activation link. Unfortunately, after registration, this social media sends you dozens of messages with useless information, which you are not interested in. To avoid that, visit this Temp mail generator: tempemail.co and you will have a Temp mail disposable address and end up on a bunch of spam lists. This email will expire after 10 minute so you can call this Temp mail 10 minute email. Our service is free! Let’s enjoy!

Facebook’s lead EU regulator is asking questions about its latest security fail – gpgmail


Facebook’s lead data protection regulator in Europe has confirmed it’s put questions to the company about a major security breach that we reported on yesterday.

“The DPC became aware of this issue through the recent media coverage and we immediately made contact with Facebook and we have asked them a series of questions. We are awaiting Facebook’s responses to those questions,” a spokeswoman for the Irish Data Protection Commission told us.

We’ve reached out to Facebook for a response.

As we reported earlier, a security research discovered an unsecured database of hundreds of millions of phone numbers linked to Facebook accounts.

The exposed server contained more than 419 million records over several databases on Facebook users from multiple countries, including 18 million records of users in the U.K.

We were able to verify a number of records in the database — including UK Facebook users’ data.

The presence of Europeans’ data in the scraped stash makes he breach a clear matter of interest to the region’s data watchdogs.

Europe’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) imposes stiff penalties for compliance failures such as security breaches — with fines that can scale as high as 4% of a company’s annual turnover.

Ireland’s DPC is Facebook’s lead data protection regulator in Europe under GDPR’s one-stop shop mechanism — meaning it leads on cross-border actions, though other concerned DPAs can contribute to cases and may also chip in views on any formal outcomes that result.

The UK’s data protection watchdog, the ICO, told us it is aware of the Facebook security incident.

“We are in contact with the Irish Data Protection Commission (DPC), as they are the lead supervisory authority for Facebook Ireland Limited. The ICO will continue to liaise with the IDPC to establish the details of the incident and to determine if UK residents have been affected,” an ICO spokeswoman also told us.

It’s not yet clear whether the Irish DPC will open a formal investigation of the incident.

It does already have a large number of open investigations on its desk into Facebook and Facebook-owned businesses since GDPR’s one-stop mechanism came into force — including one into a major token security breach last year, and many, many more.

In the latest breach instance, it’s not clear exactly when Facebook users phone numbers were scraped from the platform.

In a response yesterday Facebook said the data-set is “old”, adding that it “appears to have information obtained before we made changes last year to remove people’s ability to find others using their phone numbers”.

If that’s correct, the data breach is likely to pre-date April 2018 — which was when Facebook announced it was making changes to its account search and recovery feature, after finding it had been abused by what it dubbed “malicious actors”.

“Given the scale and sophistication of the activity we’ve seen, we believe most people on Facebook could have had their public profile scraped in this way,” Facebook said at the time.

It would also therefore pre-date GDPR coming into force, in May 2018, so would likely fall under earlier EU data protection laws — which carry less stringent penalties.


10 minutes mail – Also known by names like : 10minemail, 10minutemail, 10mins email, mail 10 minutes, 10 minute e-mail, 10min mail, 10minute email or 10 minute temporary email. 10 minute email address is a disposable temporary email that self-destructed after a 10 minutes. https://tempemail.co/– is most advanced throwaway email service that helps you avoid spam and stay safe. Try tempemail and you can view content, post comments or download something

Amazon’s lead EU data regulator is asking questions about Alexa privacy – gpgmail


Amazon’s lead data regulator in Europe, Luxembourg’s National Commission for Data Protection, has raised privacy concerns about its use of manual human reviews of Alexa AI voice assistant recordings.

A spokesman for the regulator confirmed in an email to gpgmail it is discussing the matter with Amazon, adding: “At this stage, we cannot comment further about this case as we are bound by the obligation of professional secrecy.” The development was reported earlier by Reuters.

We’ve reached out to Amazon for comment.

Amazon’s Alexa voice AI, which is embedded in a wide array of hardware — from the company’s own brand Echo smart speaker line to an assortment of third party devices (such as this talkative refrigerator or this oddball table lamp) — listens pervasively for a trigger word which activates a recording function, enabling it to stream audio data to the cloud for processing and storage.

However trigger-word activated voice AIs have been shown to be prone to accidental activation. While a device may be being used in a multi-person household. So there’s always a risk of these devices recording any audio in their vicinity, not just intentional voice queries…

In a nutshell, the AIs’ inability to distinguish between intentional interactions and stuff they overhear means they are natively prone to eavesdropping — hence the major privacy concerns.

These concerns have been dialled up by recent revelations that tech giants — including Amazon, Apple and Google — use human workers to manually review a proportion of audio snippets captured by their voice AIs, typically for quality purposes. Such as to try to improve the performance of voice recognition across different accents or environments. But that means actual humans are listening to what might be highly sensitive personal data.

Earlier this week Amazon quietly added an option to the settings of the Alexa smartphone app to allow users to opt out of their audio snippets being added to a pool that may be manually reviewed by people doing quality control work for Amazon — having not previously informed Alexa users of its human review program.

The policy shift followed rising attention on the privacy of voice AI users — especially in Europe.

Last month thousands of recordings of users of Google’s AI assistant were leaked to the Belgian media which was able to identify some of the people in the clips.

A data protection watchdog in Germany subsequently ordered Google to halt manual reviews of audio snippets.

Google responded by suspending human reviews across Europe. While its lead data watchdog in Europe, the Irish DPC, told us it’s “examining” the issue.

Separately, in recent days, Apple has also suspended human reviews of Siri snippets — doing so globally, in its case — after a contractor raised privacy concerns in the UK press over what Apple contractors are privy to when reviewing Siri audio.

The Hamburg data protection agency which intervened to halt human reviews of Google Assistant snippets urged its fellow EU privacy watchdogs to prioritize checks on other providers of language assistance systems — and “implement appropriate measures” — naming both Apple and Amazon.

In the case of Amazon, scrutiny from European watchdogs looks to be fast dialling up.

At the time of writing it is the only one of the three tech giants not to have suspended human reviews of voice AI snippets, either regionally or globally.

In a statement provided to the press at the time it changed Alexa settings to offer users an opt-out from the chance of their audio being manually reviewed, Amazon said:

We take customer privacy seriously and continuously review our practices and procedures. For Alexa, we already offer customers the ability to opt-out of having their voice recordings used to help develop new Alexa features. The voice recordings from customers who use this opt-out are also excluded from our supervised learning workflows that involve manual review of an extremely small sample of Alexa requests. We’ll also be updating information we provide to customers to make our practices more clear.


10 minutes mail – Also known by names like : 10minemail, 10minutemail, 10mins email, mail 10 minutes, 10 minute e-mail, 10min mail, 10minute email or 10 minute temporary email. 10 minute email address is a disposable temporary email that self-destructed after a 10 minutes. https://tempemail.co/– is most advanced throwaway email service that helps you avoid spam and stay safe. Try tempemail and you can view content, post comments or download something

How to Choose an ESP? 15 Questions to Ask Before You Sign Up


Torn between a couple of email service providers or even more? Relax, you are not alone. Making up your mind can be tough when there are hundreds of ESPs who all claim to offer “the best fit” for your business needs. In today’s post, we’ll go through several questions to ask the potential providers that will help you choose an ESP that will really be a match for your brand necessities. But before that, let’s answer a few questions you might be asking yourself right now.

What is an ESP for email marketing?

ESP stands for email service provider. Email service providers are platforms which allow users to send mass marketing emails, mass transactional emails and other types of emails to specific lists of recipients (subscribers).

 

Why choose an ESP?

Email service providers let you send hundreds and thousands of emails to potential leads and customers with just a click. Moreover, most ESPs offer automations which means you can send mass emails even while you are sleeping. Such an opportunity is definitely alluring for most email marketers and business owners.

Undoubtedly, in order to be functional and competitive, email service providers need to:

  • allow users create and maintain lists of email subscribers;
  • allow users send emails to many subscribers at a time, by automation and/or manually;
  • offer a user-friendly email builder or maintain a library of pre-made email templates, since not everybody is familiar with HTML for email;
  • provide reports which help users measure the success of their campaigns.

 

Why choosing a particular ESP is so important?

Don’t they all offer the same? No, not really, and that’s definitely good news to you! Besides having different interfaces, email marketing platforms have several basic functionalities and a lot of different advanced features such as integration opportunities with third parties, email builders, error detection capabilities, security tools, etc. When it comes to choosing the right ESP, you need to find the one whose services and features correspond to your exact needs.

Once you’ve found the perfect match, you’ll know it because your deliverability rate and ROI will increase. Migrating to the new ESP will happen seamlessly, along with integrating your systems with it. You’ll receive collaboration and timely technical support. These and many more factors will clearly speak that you’ve chosen the right ESP but before you do, here are the questions you need to ask several email service provider candidates.

 

Questions to ask before you choose an ESP

Questions to ask before choosing an ESP

1. What email types do you support?

Some ESPs are exclusively focused on a transactional email service which means they are great if you need to send automated responses, operational messages, and other transactional mailings. However, if your purpose is to conduct whole email marketing campaigns, you need to find an appropriate vendor.

2. What are the costs?

Planning your budget is a must-have step before you decide on an ESP. Ask for a consultation on the plans according to the volume of your email database and sending patterns. Have in mind that some ESP offer free plans with basic features which might or might not be good for you. Ask for such and then upgrade to paid plans.

3. What about additional costs, fees, payment methods, and termination terms?

These are all factors you need to clear up when considering different ESPs. It’s important not to make rash decisions. At first, a vendor may seem more affordable but there may be additional costs that will impact your budget. In result, the scales may turn in favor of the other. Everything related to costs and payment needs to be cleared up in advance.

4. Is the interface user-friendly?

As a user, you would love to set up new campaigns and monitor results as quickly as possible. Your ESP should provide an easy-to-understand, intuitive and functional interface that will help you do your job seamlessly.

5. Do you have an email builder or an email template library?

Not everyone wants to integrate custom HTML emails and even if you do, for some campaign you would just want to use the ESP’s email builder. How easy is it to work with? Is there a diversity of pre-made templates that can be edited?

6. Is API integration available?

If you want to connect your own platform and CRM tools to the ESP in order to sync data and manage your systems from a single interface, then you need to ask in advance if this option is provided.

7. Will you have a dedicated IP?

A dedicated IP allows you to control and maintain your reputation as an email sender, as well as have a better control on your deliverability. If you are going to share ID with other senders, you need to ask the provider how they are going to manage the shared ID reputation, e.g. will they suspend accounts which harm the IP? Moreover, if you send emails to huge databases, ask if you can use several dedicated IPs and how much would that cost.

8. What are your deliverability rate and is deliverability monitored?

Email deliverability is a major factor which determines your success. Before you decide on a vendor, ask them about their deliverability rate for the entire customer base. Ask if they monitor deliverability constantly. Do they allow third-party deliverability audit or do they offer one?

9. How about segmentation options and A/B testings?

When asking about segmentation options and A/B testings, we recommend that you ask if the ESP supports exactly the segmentation options you need and how easy would that be to handle? Would you have to create separate versions of the same template and separate email lists even if you want to change only the subject line? Or would the template update automatically? What are the possibilities for segmentation?

10. What is your uptime and how do you handle the downtime?

Uptime is also a major factor you need to ask about. Choose an ESP which can provide 99.9% uptime and also ask how they handle the downtime. Do they recover data? Ask about their records of past crises and how they handled the situation.

11. How will the migration to the ESP go?

You are looking for a smooth migration process without impacting your revenue or other essential metrics.

12. How will you track your success?

Ask about what kind of analysis and reports the vendor provides. The basic metrics you need to follow are sent emails, delivered emails, bounces, opens, clicks.

13. How about customer support?

Customer support is as essential as many other factors when choosing an ESP. Would you require 24/7 support? What are the channels they use for customer support – is a live chat or a phone call available? The answers to these questions determine the timely reaction of the vendor when you need assistance. Also, if you need training with the email design or coding, ask if they offer such.

14. Security and compliance with regulations?

For you, it’s very important to know that the email service provider uses reliable security tools and if their policy is compliant with the regulations. Sending emails to different audiences may require different levels of regulation. Also, ask about how they collect emails and how they manage the unsubscribe process.

15. Is there a free trial?

Even you think you’ve found the perfect match for your business needs, you can never be completely sure unless you’ve tested out the platform for some time.

 

To sum up,

Make sure you know the answers to these questions before you finally choose an ESP that corresponds to your needs best. If you believe even more questions are important in order to help you choose an ESP that’s right for your business, feel free to share with us in the comments below.