‘We’re not weird anymore’: Giffgaff’s CMO-turned-CEO on giving the brand purpose- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

It’s been 18 months since Giffgaff’s chief marketing officer was propelled into the top job, a rare move in the dog-eat-dog world of British telecoms. In hindsight, Ash Schofield admits he may have underestimated how big a leap the change of desk would be. Now, after a challenging period, he is settled in and has revealed his ambitious plans for the brand.
Schofield has been at the decade-old Giffgaff brand for nearly eight years. He joined from Tesco Mobile in 2012 when it was a plucky upstart and housed just a handful of employees. Today, he runs a company of over 230 staff.
“Marketing had always had a very strong voice in the company so what would be different?” he recalls of his promotion. “As soon as I changed desk – everything was different.
“I had thought Giffgaff was a marketing business but as CEO I realised that actually I’m running a technology company. I was on a bit of a journey that first six months to find my place in that. How I describe it back to the team now is that what we’re running is a brand-led technology company.”
It’s a bit of a mouthful, but a fundamental idea that the entire group has had to get its head around over the past year. Schofield wants his cohort of data and technology experts to have the same appreciation for brand building that the marketing team do, and conversely for his marketers to approach everything with the fast pace, “test and learn” mindset that’s embedded within the technology side of the business.
“I want to make marketeers out of everybody. Everyone is working on the brand in some way, whether it be writing a line of code to deliver an experience, or working on creative, and it all impacts our members and potential future members. So, I want everyone to think with that kind of value creation mindset. That’s the mission,” says Schofield.
“Gone are the days when you rely on a marketing team and its agencies to come up with that big idea that you’re going to spend six months or a year building, and then place everything on that bet and cross your fingers that you win. We now embrace a lean UX methodology.”
Despite the business being five times the size from when he first walked through the doors, Schofield has been determined to maintain the start-up “habits” that would have been so easy to park at some point along the way. It’s critical to the way he sees the company working in the future as it continues to grow.
“When I joined, every Monday 40 people got together to talk about what had happened [in the past week] and what was going to happen. We still do that today,” he says of the weekly ritual which sees all staff congregate in its Uxbridge auditorium to update on business priorities.
“It’s really important to keep these things as you scale. Because you don’t want to lose that edge. I don’t want anyone to ever say ‘I don’t know why we do this – it’s just the way we’ve always done it’. You’ve got to challenge constantly what you do and how you do it.”
This mindset is what’s perhaps helped it through challenges in the past year that no new chief executive wants to face. Chief among them, a potentially brand-killing revelation that Giffgaff had been inadvertently overcharging 2.6 million customers for most of its existence. Ofcom fined it £1.4m for the error, though gave it credit for admitting the mistake.
Schofield was just a few months into his CEO tenure when he had to deal with the fallout.
“I knew that people would judge us on what happened next. We are all human and people do occasionally make mistakes. By the time we’d told Ofcom, we had already started paying everybody back, including people who had already left Giffgaff. We hired an agency to try and find them to give them the money back, even if it was like only a pound,” he recalls.
In that period it obsessively tracked the impact on the brand, but encouragingly it didn’t fall. In fact, Schofield claims that as a result of the swift action and comms strategy, it actually saw its steady Net Promoter Score of 68 go up a couple points.
“That’s how opinions are formed. You can’t get it right every time, all the time. And people will form their judgments based on what happens when maybe it didn’t go quite so smoothly,” he continues.
“I guess being from a marketing background, being used to managing comms it was an area that I could add something to. When you’re CEO, you’ve got to decide which kind you going to be. Are you going to be one that tells everyone what to do or are you going to the kind that liberates people? For me, it’s the latter. And where I can personally make myself helpful by guiding people through a situation based on my experience and they grow out of it as well.”

Troubles behind him, Schofield is now looking ahead and wants Giffgaff to establish its “purpose” over the coming year. Its 3 million strong customer base is broadening from the 18-25 male-skewing audience it first attracted with its cheap bundles and “freedom” positioning. And with that has come the opportunity to talk about more than just price and convenience.
A major focus is the idea of sustainability. He’s still working through what this means long-term for Giffgaff, but the relentless push for everyone to embrace a “test-and-learn” way of working means it’s been making small bets on a few projects to see how the concept lands with customers.
So far, it’s paying off.
At the beginning of 2019 it invested heavily in its refurbed phone division, which allows people to buy a second-hand phone whether they plan to use a Giffgaff sim-card or not. It quickly filmed a series of 300-idents for its sponsorship of ITV’s The Voice, all of which were shot on second-hand phones.
A few months later, on Black Friday, it launched a pop-up store – the first time the brand had gone offline – which it filled with second-hand items, including phones, and asked visitors to pledge to make more sustainable choices. 1,500 people participated in the experiential stunt and it highlighted just how “useful” the phone company could be in giving people an alternative to buying new from the big brands.
“It’s a massive shift,” Schofield says. “We’re building a category. The majority of sales are coming from refurbed phones. The success that we’ve had has given us an extra poke to look even deeper on whether there’s more we could be doing that’s a win-win for us, our customers and society.”
How this continues to play out over the coming year is still a bit of a mystery. Schofield says he doesn’t want to set marketing budgets or concrete plans for the year; doing so would limit its flexibility to launch something at the drop of a hat. He does, however, expect to spend more on events that get the brand off screens and allow people to interact with it in the real world.
“Giffgaff is much more mainstream. 10 years ago, it was a mobile network that didn’t have any shops and didn’t have a call centre and seemed a bit weird. We’re officially weird anymore,” he laughs.
This broadening appeal to more than just the teens and student demographic means it’s also opening the door to more commercial opportunities. In yet another experiment last year it allowed start-up energy company Bulb to effectively advertise to its customer base.
At the time, it was running a series with financial advice and was looking for ways to help people save money. The opportunity then came knocking for Bulb to promote its affordable green energy services on its platform.
“We’re a community-based platform that happens to focus on mobile, but we can sell anything our community wants,” Schofield explains, saying there are around 10,000 members of this online group that Giffgaff consults on everything from new bundles and app ideas to how its services are performing.
“It was an interesting experiment to work out whether people would listen if we we’ve started to talk about things other than mobile. They did. It’s exciting for us.”
Schofield and co are now mulling how they can “shine a light” on other brands to its customers though they stress it’s simply “territory to explore”.
He surmises: “The environment that we operate in feels like it’s changing. Both socially and technologically and that’s going to be really exciting.”

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How technology can help companies measure their purpose and values- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

Read Article

Companies that know and understand their purpose do better. Study after study shows that having a strong vision, well-defined values and a varied culture leads to improved financial results and a happier workforce.
While the idea of stakeholder capitalism isn’t new, it’s rapidly taking hold. Chief executives from 180 US companies say social responsibility should come before profit, and the World Economic Forum’s new Davos Manifesto seeks to ensure corporate leaders are taking their pledges seriously.
With corporate purpose and values in the spotlight, business leaders must take responsibility for ensuring the ideas are authentic, clearly communicated and accurately benchmarked. Defining and measuring success lies at the heart of this, with artificial intelligence, machine learning and data mining offering new ways to evaluate progress.
Done right, this could underpin a shift away from traditional metrics, such as profit and the bottom line, toward a holistic and dynamic overview of what’s being achieved.
Here are three areas in which we can all use technology to better understand our impact, regardless of industry or sector.
Reducing your carbon footprintPutting climate change and the environment at the heart of policy is a good first step for any corporation. It’s not just about reducing your own environmental impact, but also helping others to reduce theirs.
Harnessing ICT products and services can help lower everyone’s carbon dioxide emissions by as much as 20%. BT Group has pledged to achieve net-zero carbon emissions by 2045 and has already set and reached some rigorous science-based targets.
Investing in renewable energy sources, cutting emissions from buildings, and moving toward electric vehicles are just some of the steps to hitting these targets.
Technology can not only assist in setting and measuring these goals – it can help us achieve them too. For example, in cutting business travel. Where in the past employees might have jumped on a flight, constantly improving collaboration tools, not to mention augmented and virtual reality, now reduce the need for face-to-face meetings.
In a similar way, technology such as robotics or 3D printing can also help improve product and factory efficiencies, meaning fewer materials and resources are used to get the same, or even better, results. And artificial intelligence is already being used for the predictive maintenance of equipment.
The Internet of Things offers ways to utilize data to reduce carbon footprints. For example, Auto Mate – an IoT-enabled vehicle-monitoring system – collects fuel economy and carbon data and suggests ways drivers and fleet managers can act to improve their environmental impact.
Improving access to technology for all While using technology in this way can only be positive, we must also be mindful of those at risk of being left behind.
About half the world’s population doesn’t have access to the internet, cutting them off from opportunities and limiting their potential to build the skills they need to thrive. Improving this can bring benefits like mobile banking and access to financing to remote areas, while access to social media can give a voice to communities that may otherwise feel isolated.
It’s not just an issue for developing countries. In the UK, almost 12 million people lack the digital skills they need for everyday life. BT’s Skills for Tomorrow initiative aims to reach and help reskill 10 million people by 2025. By targeting teachers, young people, older citizens, small-business owners and families, the program has a wide and ambitious scope. It’s also gone global, with a three-year partnership with the British Asian Trust in India to enable girls to access information, skills and opportunities – improving their understanding of equality, supporting their employability, and informing them about support for good health.
Programs like these are vital to ensuring the proliferation of technology doesn’t create a two-tier society.
Treading the ethical tightropeIn a similar way, making sure the spread of technology is also ethical should be central to any measure of success. While we’ve focused on the benefits these advances can bring, corporations must also guard against the potential for them to be misused, either intentionally or unintentionally.
Corporate leaders should work with their stakeholders to help people feel safe online and instill confidence that their transactions and data are secure, while also protecting privacy and freedom of expression.
For example, when we harness the power of artificial intelligence, we need to make sure we understand how it is making choices and that those decisions don’t include an inbuilt bias caused by the data.
Regulation alone is not the answer. All corporate leaders need to step up to gain trust and ensure their data is not misused.
As technology reshapes our world, corporations can take advantage of new and innovative approaches to benchmarking success. We have discussed a few ways it can enhance the power of communications while also creating a meaningful impact, as well as some alternative metrics that can underpin corporate benchmarking and help plot a course for the future.
Understanding corporate purpose and measuring its results is a task that’s constantly evolving. In 2020, business leaders must ensure all stakeholders are included and served, ensuring people remain the focus as technology marches on.
Authored by Jennifer Artley, Managing director, Technology, Life Science & Business Services, British Telecom

If you have an interesting article / experience / case study to share, please get in touch with us at [email protected]

Tempemail , Tempmail Temp email addressess (10 minutes emails)– When you want to create account on some forum or social media, like Facebook, Reddit, Twitter, TikTok you have to enter information about your e-mail box to get an activation link. Unfortunately, after registration, this social media sends you dozens of messages with useless information, which you are not interested in. To avoid that, visit this Temp mail generator: tempemail.co and you will have a Temp mail disposable address and end up on a bunch of spam lists. This email will expire after 10 minute so you can call this Temp mail 10 minute email. Our service is free! Let’s enjoy!

How technology can help companies measure their purpose and values- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

Read Article

Companies that know and understand their purpose do better. Study after study shows that having a strong vision, well-defined values and a varied culture leads to improved financial results and a happier workforce.
While the idea of stakeholder capitalism isn’t new, it’s rapidly taking hold. Chief executives from 180 US companies say social responsibility should come before profit, and the World Economic Forum’s new Davos Manifesto seeks to ensure corporate leaders are taking their pledges seriously.
With corporate purpose and values in the spotlight, business leaders must take responsibility for ensuring the ideas are authentic, clearly communicated and accurately benchmarked. Defining and measuring success lies at the heart of this, with artificial intelligence, machine learning and data mining offering new ways to evaluate progress.
Done right, this could underpin a shift away from traditional metrics, such as profit and the bottom line, toward a holistic and dynamic overview of what’s being achieved.
Here are three areas in which we can all use technology to better understand our impact, regardless of industry or sector.
Reducing your carbon footprintPutting climate change and the environment at the heart of policy is a good first step for any corporation. It’s not just about reducing your own environmental impact, but also helping others to reduce theirs.
Harnessing ICT products and services can help lower everyone’s carbon dioxide emissions by as much as 20%. BT Group has pledged to achieve net-zero carbon emissions by 2045 and has already set and reached some rigorous science-based targets.
Investing in renewable energy sources, cutting emissions from buildings, and moving toward electric vehicles are just some of the steps to hitting these targets.
Technology can not only assist in setting and measuring these goals – it can help us achieve them too. For example, in cutting business travel. Where in the past employees might have jumped on a flight, constantly improving collaboration tools, not to mention augmented and virtual reality, now reduce the need for face-to-face meetings.
In a similar way, technology such as robotics or 3D printing can also help improve product and factory efficiencies, meaning fewer materials and resources are used to get the same, or even better, results. And artificial intelligence is already being used for the predictive maintenance of equipment.
The Internet of Things offers ways to utilize data to reduce carbon footprints. For example, Auto Mate – an IoT-enabled vehicle-monitoring system – collects fuel economy and carbon data and suggests ways drivers and fleet managers can act to improve their environmental impact.
Improving access to technology for all While using technology in this way can only be positive, we must also be mindful of those at risk of being left behind.
About half the world’s population doesn’t have access to the internet, cutting them off from opportunities and limiting their potential to build the skills they need to thrive. Improving this can bring benefits like mobile banking and access to financing to remote areas, while access to social media can give a voice to communities that may otherwise feel isolated.
It’s not just an issue for developing countries. In the UK, almost 12 million people lack the digital skills they need for everyday life. BT’s Skills for Tomorrow initiative aims to reach and help reskill 10 million people by 2025. By targeting teachers, young people, older citizens, small-business owners and families, the program has a wide and ambitious scope. It’s also gone global, with a three-year partnership with the British Asian Trust in India to enable girls to access information, skills and opportunities – improving their understanding of equality, supporting their employability, and informing them about support for good health.
Programs like these are vital to ensuring the proliferation of technology doesn’t create a two-tier society.
Treading the ethical tightropeIn a similar way, making sure the spread of technology is also ethical should be central to any measure of success. While we’ve focused on the benefits these advances can bring, corporations must also guard against the potential for them to be misused, either intentionally or unintentionally.
Corporate leaders should work with their stakeholders to help people feel safe online and instill confidence that their transactions and data are secure, while also protecting privacy and freedom of expression.
For example, when we harness the power of artificial intelligence, we need to make sure we understand how it is making choices and that those decisions don’t include an inbuilt bias caused by the data.
Regulation alone is not the answer. All corporate leaders need to step up to gain trust and ensure their data is not misused.
As technology reshapes our world, corporations can take advantage of new and innovative approaches to benchmarking success. We have discussed a few ways it can enhance the power of communications while also creating a meaningful impact, as well as some alternative metrics that can underpin corporate benchmarking and help plot a course for the future.
Understanding corporate purpose and measuring its results is a task that’s constantly evolving. In 2020, business leaders must ensure all stakeholders are included and served, ensuring people remain the focus as technology marches on.
Authored by Jennifer Artley, Managing director, Technology, Life Science & Business Services, British Telecom

If you have an interesting article / experience / case study to share, please get in touch with us at [email protected]

Tempemail , Tempmail Temp email addressess (10 minutes emails)– When you want to create account on some forum or social media, like Facebook, Reddit, Twitter, TikTok you have to enter information about your e-mail box to get an activation link. Unfortunately, after registration, this social media sends you dozens of messages with useless information, which you are not interested in. To avoid that, visit this Temp mail generator: tempemail.co and you will have a Temp mail disposable address and end up on a bunch of spam lists. This email will expire after 10 minute so you can call this Temp mail 10 minute email. Our service is free! Let’s enjoy!

Nostalgia and its male icons overpower purpose and sadvertising at the Super Bowl- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

As the backdrop of geopolitical uncertainty gets another coat of paint, the majority of the Super Bowl’s advertisers relinquished their obsession with purposeful advertising in favor of pure, often familiar entertainment. But the problem with nostalgia is the past tends to skew male.
“Every client is putting out briefs about saving the world right now,” one agency chief told me early last week, as we were predicted what last night’s commercial breaks would look like.
We’d already had a peek at spots from Audi (saving the climate), Google, (saving memories) and the NFL (saving lives) and it looked like we were in for another night of somberly purposeful marketing, complete with slow-motion shots, violin-heavy orchestration and home movie archive footage.
But as the ads rolled out in order last night, we were proven wrong. Its advertisers appeared to have realized they might have an easier job of cheering up the world rather than saving it.
What’s the surest way of raising a smile? Bill Murray. Jeep waited until the last minute to throw down its A-list ace – a genius 1994 Groundhog Day throwback predicated on casting one of Hollywood’s most irreverent stars.
But the 20th century nostalgia kicked off well before the fourth quarter break.
Cheetos had resurrected MC Hammer in the form of an anthropomorphic picnic blanket, Snickers had (kind of) modernized Coke’s Hilltop for the era of the deathly selfie and Mountain Dew recreated The Shining with an aspartame-laden substitute for blood.
Squaresquare inexplicably had poor Winona Ryder lying prostrate in the Minnesota snow.
But Ryder, who played the absurd weirdo against her spot’s reliable cop antagonist, was an anomaly of solo female talent in a year dominated by throwbacks. Sure, 90% of ads included women – up from 74% last year – but the problem with “throwing back” to the past is the past tended to relegate women to supporting parts.
So, when the industry compiles its top 10 creative, it shines a spotlight on the joy brought by Bill Murray and Bryan Cranston and MC Hammer and Martin Scorsese and Sam Elliott and and Jimmy Fallon and Sly Stallone.
And because the power of memory is a shortcut to emotion, we hold those stars and their ads in higher esteem to the modern ubiquity of Chrissy Teigen, Maisie Williams, Sofia Vergara and Busy Phillips.
There were exceptions, of course. Ellen DeGeneres, who effortlessly blurs the lines of throwback and contemporary female talent, added star quality to an already well-scripted, well-conceived and well-produced Amazon Alexa ad. Rachel Dratch was arguably the secret comic weapon in Hyundai’s much-praised ‘Smaht Pahk’.
And then there was Microsoft, an advertiser that stuck with sincerity and won. It wrote its entire commercial around Katie Sowers, the NFL’s first female and first openly gay coach who spoke straightforwardly about her dreams and challenges.
In a sea of funny testosterone, the authentic story stood out of the pack to be named the ‘most emotionally effective’ ad of last night’s commercialpalooza, according to System1. It was complete with slow-motion shots, violin-heavy orchestration and home movie archive footage, and proved that in harder times, audiences do not want to be merely entertained.

Tempemail , Tempmail Temp email addressess (10 minutes emails)– When you want to create account on some forum or social media, like Facebook, Reddit, Twitter, TikTok you have to enter information about your e-mail box to get an activation link. Unfortunately, after registration, this social media sends you dozens of messages with useless information, which you are not interested in. To avoid that, visit this Temp mail generator: tempemail.co and you will have a Temp mail disposable address and end up on a bunch of spam lists. This email will expire after 10 minute so you can call this Temp mail 10 minute email. Our service is free! Let’s enjoy!

Do consumers think brand purpose is bullshit?- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

Studies have been fielded, and the results are in: only 27% of US consumers can name a purpose-driven brand, according to the new Purpose Power Index. Yet we also know that profits are boosted by purpose. Our visionary business leaders are clear on this point: in 2019, The Business Roundtable of 181 leading CEOs signed a declaration, putting ‘purpose over profits’. According to Larry Fink of BlackRock, profits aren’t sustainable without purpose. Taking it a step further, Elon Musk doesn’t see the point of spending time on anything except the uber-purpose of accelerating a sustainable future.
So what’s going on here? Purpose has been shown to grow and transform companies, yet that potential is wildly underleveraged. How do we understand the current state of play?
The Pepsi debacle provides an important clue; a cautionary tale for brands hoping to jump on the purpose bandwagon in a hurry. Indeed, success with Purpose is far from assured – in no small part because, as brands deal in emotion, story-telling, and inspiration, they are subject to the same human B.S. meters that we use on people.
In real life, we have plenty of skepticism for big talkers. We’re wise to empty promises, hollow words, and pie in the sky. We try to steer clear of people who talk a good game or build castles in the air. Is it a coincidence that the phrase “campaign promises” can be applied to both untrustworthy political candidates and untrustworthy brands?
The big issue CEOs, CMOs, HR VPs, and other leaders face is activating Purpose while avoiding these minefields. I see this every day in my role at StrawberryFrog, where we specialize in creating movements that activate purpose inside companies, both internally with employees, and externally, to grow brands with consumers.
In fact, when brands articulate a purpose, they’ve taken the first of 1000 steps toward making it real. The bulk of the work lies ahead, in transforming an abstract statement into tangible commitments and actions. And even then, all purpose work will meet same skeptical audience (us) that reads a brand’s intentions the way we read a candidate’s: if they’re not quickly embodied in action, or if they don’t smell right, they will be quickly dismissed.
So keep an eye out for these common pitfalls when approaching the Purpose task.
Your purpose is at the wrong altitude
This is about selecting the right playing field – one your brand is comfortable in. Is your brand doing something extraordinary at its core? Does your executive board err on the side of practicality? Do you have a visionary CEO? Does your brand touch users in a daily way? These considerations may help brands place themselves along a spectrum from functional to higher order purposes.
And higher isn’t necessarily better: Google has a purpose that connects directly with the functional job the brand does. It’s a wonderful example of a ‘ground-floor’ purpose: “to organize the world’s information, and make it universally accessible.”
For brands flying in the middle of the altitude spectrum, the focus may be on a benefit the brand provides – how it improves our lives. Starbucks flies at this altitude with its purpose: “To inspire and nourish the human spirit, one cup, one person, and one neighborhood at a time.”
And Tesla flies up there at 30,000 feet, focused as the brand is on its role in society: ushering in a sustainable future.
There is no right way to answer this question, no ‘correct’ altitude to fly at, but there is probably a right answer for every brand, based on how the brand carries itself in the minds of those who keep the flame. This is a question worth tackling early on in a Purpose conversation.
It’s generic to the category (or just generic)
There are more finance brands than you can shake a stick at with purposes that sound something like, “to help clients achieve their goals / pursue the best outcomes for clients / in service of clients’ success.” By definition, this idea can’t be used to build a brand purpose, because it’s the reason for being of the entire financial services category.
The key purpose question for this sector would be: you are in the banking / investing / lending business, along with thousands of other banks, investment firms, and lenders. Why does your brand exist? What is your unique mission? Beware a purpose that sounds just like everyone else’s.
It’s tone-deaf to the real issues your customers are facing
Just as it’s important to fly at an altitude that’s right for your brand, it’s equally important to meet a real need in the world your customers inhabit. For example, it may be counter-productive to offer inspiration or entertainment to consumers who struggle with crippling debt. Or to offer a “pink” promise to customers focused on equality. Make sure you’ve got an ear to the ground regarding what your customers care about and how they spend their most valuable resource – their attention.
It lacks a connection to the brand’s DNA
Pasting on a purpose is nearly always a losing proposition, especially if it doesn’t align with the brand personality and history that consumers have come to know you by. This one can be easily tested with a hypothetical tweet: if your brand could voice a purpose on Twitter and not be drowned out by the haters, it just may pass the bar.
It’s “purpose-washing”
This risk may be highest in touchy industries where the public is on alert regarding critiques of the category. In a misguided bid for immunity, skittish brands may look for a competitive edge with counter-intuitive (not to say counter-factual) purpose gestures designed to appease or distract. Think: Big Meat suddenly caring about the environment. Or Big Energy talking about wind turbines. Or Big Timber cherishing trees. These gambits will often be subjected to a high level of scrutiny, and can wind up collapsing under that pressure.
It doesn’t inspire employees
Even the most brilliantly crafted Brand Purpose will have a tremendous hill to climb without the advocacy of employees who are, in truth, its front-line. By contrast, an inspiring, authentic purpose is worth its weight in gold in terms of all the key staff metrics, from employee satisfaction and retention, to cost per recruit. When a Purpose ignites the people-power locked in your employees, there’s no telling what it can do out in the world.
It doesn’t get activated
A chick that never fledges. A horse that doesn’t leave the gate. A raisin in the sun. You get the idea. So get out there and activate!
Ali Demos, group planning director, StrawberryFrog

Tempemail , Tempmail Temp email addressess (10 minutes emails)– When you want to create account on some forum or social media, like Facebook, Reddit, Twitter, TikTok you have to enter information about your e-mail box to get an activation link. Unfortunately, after registration, this social media sends you dozens of messages with useless information, which you are not interested in. To avoid that, visit this Temp mail generator: tempemail.co and you will have a Temp mail disposable address and end up on a bunch of spam lists. This email will expire after 10 minute so you can call this Temp mail 10 minute email. Our service is free! Let’s enjoy!

Cruise’s self-driving electric shuttle is purpose built for ridesharing – Blog – 10 minute

The big picture: When you step back and think about it, traditional cars really aren’t all that ridesharing friendly. They’re difficult to get in and out of, aren’t meant to accommodate a lot of passengers and have lots of useless instruments taking up space. Really, they are best suited for individuals or small groups taking long trips.
Cruise this week showed off its vision for the future – an electric shuttle bus constructed by majority shareholder General Motors that’s purpose built for ridesharing.
Cruise has reimagined the automobile as if it never existed in the first place. The Origin strips out unnecessary equipment like the steering wheel, pedals, rearview mirrors, windshield wipers, fuel tanks and cramped seats. In their place, you’ll find spacious seats that face each other and sliding subway cart-style doors with wide entryways.

These autonomous shuttles will operate 24/7 and run for at least one million miles – far more than you can get out of the average car. Redundancy is built in so there’s no need for a backup human driver. On average, the company said a family in San Francisco that drives or use ridesharing could save up to $5,000 per year with Origin.
How – or when – we can expect to realize those savings remains a mystery as Cruise hasn’t yet shared details on when and where production will take place. We also don’t know much about the vehicle’s powertrain, battery system or cost – both how much it’ll cost Cruise to operate and how much they’ll charge riders for the opportunity.

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Tempemail , Tempmail Temp email addressess (10 minutes emails)– When you want to create account on some forum or social media, like Facebook, Reddit, Twitter, TikTok you have to enter information about your e-mail box to get an activation link. Unfortunately, after registration, this social media sends you dozens of messages with useless information, which you are not interested in. To avoid that, visit this Temp mail generator: tempemail.co and you will have a Temp mail disposable address and end up on a bunch of spam lists. This email will expire after 10 minute so you can call this Temp mail 10 minute email. Our service is free! Let’s enjoy!

J&J’s Richa Goswami says the future of marketing is balancing purpose with personalisation- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

In order to find the world’s top marketer, The World Federation of Advertisers (WFA) has once again partnered with Tempemail for the Global Marketer of the Year award. Here we interview nominee Richa Goswami about how she’s turned FMCG giant Johnson & Johnson’s business into a digitally-savvy industry leader.
Richa Goswami leads J&J’s digital efforts globally and yet she’s humbled and surprised at being considered among the industry heavyweights for the WFA marketer of the year title. It’s partly down to Goswami’s personality, which makes her a very open and approachable leader, but also a testament to a shift that’s seeing more Asia-based marketers stepping up to the global stage as we enter the ‘Asian Century’.
Goswami labels herself consumer obsessed and she’s particularly proud of the work throughout her career in which she’s gained the trust and business of harder to reach younger consumers, or millennials, for traditional and arguable old-school businesses like J&J and Standard Chartered. With 60% of the world’s millennials residing in Asia Pacific, Goswami has the geography, pedigree and experience to be able to talk about youth, innovation and connections.
She explains that at Standard Chartered, where she was looking after the personal banking segment for strategy and positioning, she was tasked with understanding what a younger, millennial generation wanted from a traditional brand.
“The ability to understand what that disruption really meant and being able to then go in and create products and services to solve for that, I think was a great opportunity and a great learning. We did that across Korea, Japan, China, India, Hong Kong and Singapore, all very diverse markets in Asia. You learn a lot as you work with millennials and I think I’ve been able to bring that into J&J because when we look at our brands, most of them are targeting the millennial consumer. So even moms, millennial moms are different to maybe the mom that I was, the way you talk to her, the way you connect with her is different,” she says.
Her point of focus isn’t always millennials, however, and she says that solving a problem for consumers is ultimately what drives her passion for marketing.
“I’ve always been someone that loves ambiguity and I love being able to go into a green space and carve something out of that. Most of my career opportunities, whether it was working with HSBC on Direct Bank in Taiwan, whether it was creating our first money transfer so that people, that immigrants all over from the US could send money home, whether they were Mexican or Chinese or Indian. It’s always been about understanding what the consumer need is and being able to translate that into a service or a proposition. Of course, there’s always failure attached to being the first out of the gate, but when I think of career highlights, those have shaped me as much as the successes. So if I could do it all again, I would,” she says.
Goswami’s attitude to failure in part comes from a decision to quit her successful banking career and move into launching a health-based start-up, as she wanted a future in which she could impact lives for the better. She ended up leaving the start-up world for J&J but not without taking some courage towards failure with her. In the five years Goswami has spent at J&J since then, she says her job changes every year.
This is partly because the challenge to move a business forward digitally is ever increasing in complexity and opportunity.
“I always look at challenges as opportunities and when I look at the industry, whether it’s banking or whether it’s healthcare, whether it’s FMCG, 52% of fortune 500 companies since 2000 no longer exist. We are all being disrupted by start-ups and we can’t afford to do what we’ve always done and expect different results. So it’s really about, do you innovate or become irrelevant?” she asks.
The challenges, or opportunities, she sees are the pace of change in consumers and the competitive landscape and the fact that this is propelled by data.
“At J&J, we’ve got very robust first party, second party and third party data strategies and we’re working on that. The opportunity is how fast can you change your marketing organization as well because we’ve had immense success working in a different style, and that’s important because you’re trying to teach a new muscle. Some people will inherently lean in and some need a bit more training to do that. I don’t think of it as a challenge because once you acknowledge that, you know what needs to be done. I’d be very focused on driving HR within workshops and training the workforce. I’m sure would be the same thing you would hear whether it’s any of our competitors or anyone else in the industry,” adds Goswami.
It is within the ever-changing role at J&J that Goswami’s found a home for her consumer obsession and the want to make a change in the world. However, in being charged with forwarding the digital mission, her focus is on how to balance purpose with personalisation.
“I think where we are headed is how do you balance purpose and personalization. We all talk about how consumers want an experience that is personalized, whether that gets delivered through our products or whether that gets delivered through the content or the creative or the messaging. That’s where the Holy grail is, or the Nirvana is. At the same time, I think consumers are also asking our brands to stand up and be authentic and be purpose-led. For us, we are trying to get that unique balance of purpose and personalization that I think is rare. If I look across the world, it is where we’re headed with our brands and the work that we’re doing,” she explains.
You can vote for Goswami, or the other finalists for the WFA Marketer of the Year Award, here.

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Time to gamify change through purpose: movements keep on moving- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

Recently the first ever empirical measure of Brand Purpose, called the Purpose Power Index was launched. This is the largest study ever measuring perceptions of brand purpose based on 17,500 individualized responses among over 7,500 US consumers. ThePurpose Power Index showed us that consumers are calling BS on purpose brands with only 27% of consumers aware of brand purpose, a surprisingly low number at a time when most CEOs and CMOs claim to have a robust and relevant purpose.
What’s happening here? Brands talk about purpose, CEOs hang purpose statements in their offices, but fail to activate purpose through their organization or among consumers. At StrawberryFrog, we apply the principles of societal movements to activate brand purpose inside companies among employees, stakeholders and among consumers.
We’ve turned movement marketing into a science – an ever evolving one. We are always absorbing and applying the latest news and insights around social movements, whether they’re from the past or present, globalized or localized. It keeps us fresh, fun and hungry for more. So, what can we learn from sardines, Hong Kong, anti-anti-vaxers, British nudists and the Squawk Squad?
Gamifying change – through purpose
For ‘millennial on a mission’, Fraser McConnell, it all began with looking for a new sense of purpose, according to ‘How to grow the conservation movement: make it addictive’.
McConnell’s best friend had just died, and a planned corporate career suddenly became less appealing. He wondered how he could make an impact. Research led him to a major problem in New Zealand: how native wildlife is being driven to extinction by foreign predators and pests. It triggered his engrained love for nature – something that connected him with many New Zealanders.
Today, his award-winning social enterprise Squawk Squad has gamified the process of pest control, with trap donors being able to follow the effects of their generosity in real-time. It makes protecting native birds “addictively awesome”.
The Squawk Squad has also inspired 45,000 kids through education programmes, which are “designed to be fun, which is a way of making grim topics like kauri dieback something that kids want to engage with. Classrooms plant trees and clean up rivers, but also start thinking about wider things they can do,” says McConnell.
“The really inspiring thing is that they’re learning about global challenges, and then they’re really taking local action.”
The light touch
There’s nothing fishy about it: Italians are packing themselves into squares to wave glitter-painted cut-outs of sardines. Yes, revolution can be fun!
The Sardine Movement began as a one-off flashmob in Bologna to protest the visit of anti-immigrant populist Matteo Salvini. It struck a chord. Now, the event is attracting tens of thousands in every city that the divisive politician appears,according to ‘Politics with panache can defeat the hard right’.
The key to the movement’s success is its sense of inclusivity, with political banners and any other sign of political affiliation being banned. The aim of the game is to stay moderate and tolerant. Any negativity is greeted by song. Both pundits and public polls now regard the happily subversive Sardines as a greater threat to Salvini’s ambitions than any of the competing political parties.
“This is a tide worth swimming with.”
Know your enemy
Indeed, it’s good to know your enemy – and to fight that enemy with not only a sense of inclusion but also a clarity of vision. Certainly, in a time when there’s a senseless increase in deaths from measles, we need more articles like ‘Why we need to start a new pro-vaccine movement’.
It’s time for science to form a collective voice that does more than deride the anti-vaccine movement. This has only increased the spotlight on the misleading messages of what’s amarginal group. We must also stand ready to answer individuals with “vaccine hesitancy” in a normal way.
“Being hesitant means one is curious about a topic or has concerns or questions and this is absolutely legitimate. Those who are hesitant are raising questions and they deserve answers. It would be a fundamental mistake not to appropriately address those questions in a transparent and respectful way.”
Staying united
Movements can easily splinter and dilute. Just look at the history of British nudists (who as a group have a justifiablefear of splinters of all types). According to ‘The struggle within the naturist movement – archive, 1969’, it came down to a battle between the “hedonists” who were comfortable with the idea that nudity may sometimes lead to sex, and the “disciplinarians” who believed nudism is a greater calling and therefore had to adhere to a higher morality. These differences proved irreconcilable.
Meanwhile, today’s Hong Kong protesters seem more united than ever, even while there seems to be an increased division between nonviolent ones and those willing to clash with police. Up to a million people marched together in early December.
A shared sense of identity is key, according to ‘What the Hong Kong protests can teach the world about enduring social movements’. “We’re all Hongkongers. Our beliefs are the same, what we’re fighting for is the same, though our methods may not be the same,” says one activist
Decentralisation is also key to the movement’s durability. But this is about being leader-full and not leaderless. “When you have a leader-full movement it’s very hard to pick a target… the movement will survive because everyone will take ownership of the movement,” says another activist.
“And it’s about being nimble enough to adapt to changing circumstances.”
We’ll continue to watch and learn.
Scott Goodson, founder and chairman, StrawberryFrog

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What is the purpose of a confirmation email?


Have you ever wondered what makes confirmation emails important? 

And what it is that a business tries to achieve through sending these seemingly unimportant messages?

Today we will explain the purpose of a confirmation email, including tips to write and design these.

Let’s dig in.

So, what’s actually the purpose of a confirmation email?

In simple terms, the reason why companies send confirmation emails is to get the first interaction from the owner of the email.

This is done to ensure that:

  • Following emails won’t end up in the Spam box
  • Recipients are willing to receive more emails from the sender.

Aside from that, the purpose of a confirmation email depends on its type:

Booking confirmations have a lot in common with order confirmation emails. The purpose of these emails is to send a confirmation of a verified online booking, to ensure customers that the process is complete. Booking like these can include plane tickets, hotel rooms, restaurant tables or any other service that requires upfront booking.

Subscriber Confirmation emails are sent to users after they sign up to your list. The purpose of these emails is two-sided. Firstly, they are sent as a legal requirement, since a company needs to comply with GDPR regulations. Secondly, these initial “welcome” emails are used to guide subscribers through double opt-in.

Registration confirmation emails are very similar to Subscriber confirmation emails. They are sent to new members after they undergo a registration process on a website. Keep in mind that these are only sent by companies who offer some sort of access to members or from services that need upfront registration. For example, these can be sent by forums, e-commerce stores or by a governmental institution. Their purpose is to validate the email addresses of new members and send them useful information.

How to create a confirmation email

There are some basic but very important things to remember when creating your confirmation emails. 

You can implement these points over time and play around with them to see how your mailing list reacts to them.

Keep in mind that the purpose of a confirmation email also plays an important role when choosing what content to include.

1st step: First impressions are important

The first email you send to a new subscriber is probably the most important one. 

Failing to impress your reader during your first official interaction can quickly result in them unsubscribing from your list. 

Make reading your email a worthwhile experience by adding lots of value, such as discounts, freebies or free trials of a premium product. 

Furthermore, make sure you are reaching out in a personalized way to make your readers feel like they are talking to a real person.

2nd step: Write short and value-packed emails

If your first email is lengthy and time-consuming, you can be almost certain that subscribers will not read through it.

Sure, sometimes an order confirmation will have to include the necessary information for the customer to understand what happens next. 

However, you can just as easily create a separate landing page and add a hyperlink to your email content.

Due to the short attention span of consumers nowadays, you’ve only got a few seconds to attract attention and share your message. 

Therefore, make sure your emails are short and full of value.

3rd step: Make the design aesthetically pleasing

The famous saying “An image is worth 1000 words” applies to emails too. 

Thus, implement the right design and your readers will instantly associate your brand with a certain style of communication.

If you are using Mailigen, you can easily find many customizable templates that you can use for your confirmation emails.

To access them, in the Mailigen dashboard, hover over Campaigns and click on Templates.

4th step: Optimize for mobile readers

In 2019, the majority of people are surfing the web and reading their emails from their mobile device. 

Make sure your emails are adapted accordingly so they look great both on computer screens and mobile devices.

You can find out how to optimize your emails for mobile devices by reading this guide.

5th Step: Add a CTA

Even though the primary purpose of confirmation emails is to verify an email address to provide transaction information, there is always room for more.

Confirmation emails can also be seen as platforms where you can upsell and cross-sell products, invite subscribers to your social media channels or offer them additional discounts to increase the potential for conversion.

You can easily test different CTAs and see which ones result in high Click-Through Rates, by occasionally changing your confirmation emails’ content over time.

Time to take action

After reading through this email you should know that confirmation emails are actually really important.

Now, it’s time to pay attention on building the perfect confirmation email for your business, especially when it can lead to repeated purchases or engaged subscribers.

 All you have to do is create a unique confirmation email by joining Mailigen’s FREE trial and see what it can do for your business.