AI Detects Mental Health Changes In Patients, As Per Study- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

Artificial Intelligence has been at the crux of Signal Analysis and Interpretation Lab (SAIL) operations after AI proved to give accurate results. SAIL, in its recent collaboration with researchers from UCLA, is working on analyzing voice data of patients suffering from serious mental illnesses such as bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and depressive disorders. How does AI detect mental health changes? 
How is AI involved in patients’ mental health? 
MyCoachConnect interactive is a voice and mobile tool used by patients and psychiatrists to record their voice diaries dependant on their mental health. After this collaboration, researchers will be using AI to listen to these voicemails and notice changes in their patients’ clinical states. 
As told to ExpressHealthcare– “Machine learning allowed us to illuminate the various clinically-meaningful dimensions of language use and vocal patterns of the patients over time and personalized at each individual level,” said senior author Dr Shri Narayanan, Niki and Max Nikias Chair in Engineering and Director of SAIL at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering.
The importance of tracking changes
Mental health is a very delicate aspect of human life and must be handled with utmost care. Just like tracking the health condition of a person suffering from a physical ailment, detecting changes in thinking patterns and talking is vital. The psychologist/ psychiatrist is able to understand if they have diagnosed the patient for the correct ailment and if the treatment is working. After AI detects changes, improvement or degradation of the condition is noted. 
What more could AI do for mental health? 
Being a great support to mental health professionals, AI comes with the advantage of being available 24/7. It can be used to detect signs of depression or anxiety by assessing the language used on social media platforms. With its huge database, it will be able to recognize the first symptoms of a disorder in linguistic changes in the way a person writes or speaks. 
There are already a few companies that provide AI-related mental health services such as chatbots that speak with a person to discuss their problems. The anonymity of the bot can make an individual more comfortable in opening up. 
Use cases and predictions are many, what matters is how it reduces the growing discontent and anxiety faced by the youth across the world. 

If you have an interesting article / experience / case study to share, please get in touch with us at [email protected]

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Bupa works to normalise mental health challenging what is ‘normal’- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

Bupa asks ‘what is normal?’ in a poignant mental health campaign as it endeavours to normalise the issue and encourage more to seek help.
The healthcare company’s first major ad campaign since 2017 looks to inspire more people to speak up if they’re suffering. The spot offers reassurance that, with seven billion people on this planet, there is not one definite type of ‘normal.’
Created by MullenLowe London, the spot flicks through various everyday situations – from a man boiling a kettle looking detached to an anxious woman at a party hiding behind a mask.
The voiceover asks “Is it normal to feel anxious, off colour or that you can’t get up for work…?” touching on a range of emotions many people feel everyday, but assume they battle alone.
Bupa stresses that it’s a fact of life that most people will find their mental health challenged at some point – and concludes the spot offering reassurance that whatever is on your mind, it’s normal to Bupa.
As part of the campaign, Bupa has developed an online Mental Health Hub, which is accessible to everyone and anyone.
A go-to source of information, guidance and practical tips to help people improve their mental health, it will also signpost visitors to other valuable resources developed by mental health charities, including Mind and Samaritans.
Discussing the campaign, Angelique Waker, brand and marketing effectiveness director at Bupa UK said: “In this campaign, we want to illustrate the many shapes and forms of mental health, as well as the diverse range of people it affects.
“Many people will find their mental health challenged at some point in their lives and the new TV advert shows how this can feel. We know raising awareness is vital but we also want to encourage people to take the appropriate action to get the support they need, whatever’s on their mind.”

Tempemail , Tempmail Temp email addressess (10 minutes emails)– When you want to create account on some forum or social media, like Facebook, Reddit, Twitter, TikTok you have to enter information about your e-mail box to get an activation link. Unfortunately, after registration, this social media sends you dozens of messages with useless information, which you are not interested in. To avoid that, visit this Temp mail generator: tempemail.co and you will have a Temp mail disposable address and end up on a bunch of spam lists. This email will expire after 10 minute so you can call this Temp mail 10 minute email. Our service is free! Let’s enjoy!

We aren’t doing enough to protect young people’s mental health – and girls are suffering especially badly- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

It was disturbing to read yesterday’s news that by the time they are 15, more than a third of girls in Scotland report experiencing “very high” emotional problems. Facts such as this shine an uncomfortable spotlight on the mental health and wellbeing of our children and young people.
Even more striking was the disparity in gender. The figures showed such problems are up to three times higher among girls than among boys. A recent report from the Scottish Government also noted that many young girls in Scotland report being “unsatisfied with their physical appearance”, often trying to meet unrealistic standards seen on social media, leading to anxiety and depression.
The need for more research to understand more about the impact of social media on our young people is clear, as is the need to ensure that they are educated on how to use it healthily and on how social media promotes unrealistic expectations.

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While people are now more willing to talk about their mental health, more needs to be done to develop the resilience of our children and young people and to ensure they get the support they need when they need it.
Sadly, too many of our children and young people wait too long to get support. By raising children and young people with good mental wellbeing we can ensure that they are able to reach their full potential. 
The Scottish Children’s Services CoalitionTom McGhee, Chairman, Spark of GeniusDuncan Dunlop, Chief Executive, Who Cares? ScotlandKenny Graham, Falkland House SchoolNiall Kelly, Managing Director, Young FoundationsLynn Bell, CEO, LOVE learning

leftCreated with Sketch.

rightCreated with Sketch.

1/50 10 January 2020
Vets and volunteers treat koalas at Kangaroo Island Wildlife Park, southwest of Adelaide, Australia
AAP Image/Reuters

2/50 9 January 2020
Devotees follow the carriage transporting the statue of the Black Nazarene during an annual religious procession in its honour in Manila. Thousands of barefoot devotees joined the religious procession hoping to touch a centuries-old icon of Jesus Christ, called the Black Nazarene, which is believed to have miraculous powers
AFP via Getty

3/50 8 January 2020
People stand near the wreckage after a Ukrainian plane carrying 176 passengers crashed near Imam Khomeini airport in Tehran
ISNA/AFP via Getty

4/50 7 January 2020
Mourners gather around a vehicle carrying the coffin of Iranian top general Qasem Soleimani during the final stage of funeral processions, in his hometown Kerman. Soleimani was killed outside Baghdad airport Friday in a drone strike ordered by US President Donald Trump, ratcheting up tensions with Iran which has vowed “severe revenge”. The assassination of the 62-year-old heightened international concern about a new war in the Middle East and rattled financial markets
AFP via Getty

5/50 6 January 2020
Actor Rose McGowan speaks at a news conference outside a Manhattan courthouse after the arrival of Harvey Weinstein, in New York. Weinstein is on trial on charges of rape and sexual assault, more than two years after a torrent of women began accusing him of misconduct
AP

6/50 5 January 2020
Mourners march behind a vehicle carrying the coffins of slain major general Qassem Soleimani and others as they pay homage in the Iranian city of Mashhad
Tasnim News/AFP/Getty

7/50 4 January 2020
Rescue personnel search for bodies among mud and debris following a landslide caused by heavy rain in West Java, Indonesia
EPA

8/50 3 January 2020
A burning vehicle at the Baghdad International Airport is seen following an airstrike in Baghdad, Iraq. The Pentagon said Thursday that the US military has killed Gen. Qassem Soleimani, the head of Iran’s elite Quds Force, at the direction of President Donald Trump

AP

9/50 2 January 2020
Boats are pulled ashore as smoke and wildfires rage behind Lake Conjola, Australia. Thousands of tourists fled Australia’s wildfire-ravaged eastern coast ahead of worsening conditions as the military started to evacuate people trapped on the shore further south
Robert Oerlemans via AP

10/50 1 January 2020
Photographer Matt Roberts reacts to seeing his sister’s house destroyed by a bushfire in Quaama, New South Wales, Australia
EPA

11/50 31 December 2019
A man rides a donkey cart against the last setting sun of 2019 in Lahore, Pakistan
Reuters

12/50 30 December 2019
A Skycrane drops water on a bushfire in Bundoora, Melbourne, Australia. According to local media reports, thousands of residents and tourists were forced to evacuate in the state of Victoria as soaring temperatures and winds fanned several bushfires around the state
EPA

13/50 29 December 2019
A jumper soars through the air during a trial jump at the first stage of the 68th four hills ski jumping tournament in Oberstdorf, Germany
AP

14/50 28 December 2019
Revellers dressed in mock military garb throw eggs as they take part in the “Els Enfarinats” battle in the southeastern Spanish town of Ibi on December 28, 2019. – During this 200-year-old traditional festival participants known as Els Enfarinats (those covered in flour) dress in military clothes and stage a mock coup d’etat as they battle using flour, eggs and firecrackers outside the city town hall as part of the celebrations of the Day of the Innocents, a traditional day in Spain for pulling pranks.
AFP via Getty

15/50 27 December 2019
The Panamanian-flag cargo ship “Zelek Star” is pictured after being washed up on a beach in the southern Israeli coastal city of Ashdod during a storm
AFP via Getty

16/50 26 December 2019
Monks wearing solar filter glasses watch the “ring of fire” solar eclipse at the Gaden monastery in a Tibetan colony in Teginkoppa, India
AFP via Getty

17/50 25 December 2019
A participant in a Darth Vader costume jumps into the water during the 110th edition of the ‘Copa Nadal’ (Christmas Cup) swimming competition in Barcelona’s Port Vell. The traditional 200-meter Christmas swimming race included more than 300 participants on Barcelona’s old harbour
AFP/Getty

18/50 24 December 2019
Children dressed as Santa Claus during celebrations on Christmas Eve at a school in Amritsar
AFP via Getty

19/50 23 December 2019
Palestinians wearing Christmas costumes distribute gifts to children seated atop the rubble of a house demolished by Israel, reportedly for not being built with official licensing in the village of al-Khader, west of of Bethlehem in the occupied West Bank
AFP via Getty

20/50 22 December 2019
A journalist gets pepper-sprayed after a heated exchange with police during a rally in Hong Kong to show support for the Uighur minority in China. Hong Kong riot police broke up a solidarity rally for China’s Uighurs — with one officer drawing a pistol — as the city’s pro-democracy movement likened their plight to that of the oppressed Muslim minority
AFP via Getty

21/50 21 December 2019
Children react as a Bengal tiger licks the glass surrounding its enclosure during the “Animal Christmas Party”, where the youths were treated to a tour of the Malabon Zoo, in Manila
AFP via Getty

22/50 20 December 2019
In this long exposure photo, the United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket carrying the Boeing Starliner crew capsule lifts off on an orbital flight test to the International Space Station from Cape Canaveral
AP

23/50 19 December 2019
A freediver wearing a Father Christmas outfit poses underwater off the coast of the northern city of Batroun
AFP via Getty

24/50 18 December 2019
People rally in support of the impeachment of US President Donald Trump in front of the US Capitol, as the House readies for the historic vote
AFP via Getty

25/50 17 December 2019
Protesters set fire to dumpsters and tires as they block a road in the southern Lebanese city of Sidon
AFP via Getty

26/50 16 December 2019
People ride a merry-go-round at the Christmas Market at the Red Square in Moscow
AFP via Getty

27/50 15 December 2019
The Red Rebels, part of the Extinction Rebellion Australia demonstrator group, participate in a climate protest rally in Sydney. The group rallied in front of the landmark Sydney Opera House demanding urgent climate action from Australia’s government, as bushfire smoke choking the city caused health problems to spike
AFP via Getty

28/50 14 December 2019
Protesters block a road after setting buses on fire during a demonstration against the Indian government’s Citizenship Amendment Bill in Howrah, on the outskirts of Kolkata, India. Protests against a divisive new citizenship law raged on as Washington and London issued travel warnings for northeast India following days of violent clashes that have killed two people so far
AFP via Getty

29/50 13 December 2019
A huge cloud of black smoke raises over a burning warehouse in the southern outskirts of Moscow. There were no immediate reports of any casualties, but one fire fighter was injured and 25 ambulance cars and a special air testing vehicle are at the site, they added
EPA

30/50 12 December 2019
A slow shutter speed shot shows oarsmen in traditional costume rowing during the Royal Barge Procession to mark the conclusion of the Royal Coronation ceremony, on the Chao Phraya River in Bangkok, Thailand. The ceremony honours King Rama X after his complete accession to the throne
EPA

31/50 11 December 2019
A boy inspects his damaged home after after an attack near the Bagram Air Base in Kabul, Afghanistan, A powerful suicide bombing targeted an under-construction medical facility near the main American base north of the capital
AP

32/50 10 December 2019
Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg arrives to participate in the event “Unite behind the science” within the UN Climate Change Conference COP25 in Madrid
AFP via Getty

33/50 9 December 2019
White Island (Whakaari) volcano, as it erupts, in the Bay of Plenty, New Zealand. According to police, at least five people have died in the volcanic erruption
EPA/Michael Schade

34/50 8 December 2019
People gather amidst the ruins of a building, destroyed during reported Syrian regime and Russian air strikes the previous day in the town of Balyun. The reported air raids killed 19 civilians, eight of them children, in the country’s last major opposition bastion
AFP via Getty

35/50 7December 2019
A French CGT unionist holds up the union’s flag as he demonstrates against unemployment amidst smoke bombs in Nantes. The most serious nationwide strike to hit France in years caused new misery for weekend travellers, with defiant unions dismissing proposals by the government and warning walkouts would last well into next week
AFP via Getty

36/50 6 December 2019
People stand on top of a collapsed six-storey building in Nairobi, Kenya. Local media reported that several people are feared trapped as the rescue operation continues
EPA

37/50 5 December 2019
Indonesia players celebrate a point during their match against Vietnam in the women’s volleyball preliminary round of the Southeast Asian Games being held in the Philippines
Reuters

38/50 4 December 2019
Firefighters work to contain a large fire at an industrial building at Inlet Road inn Auckland, New Zealand
Getty

39/50 3 December 2019
Doan Quynh Nam Tran of Vietnam competes in the women’s gymnastics at the SEA Games (Southeast Asian Games) in Manila
AFP via Getty

40/50 2 December 2019
A youth plays on foamy discharge, caused by pollutants, as it mixes with the surf at a beach in Chennai
AFP via Getty

41/50 1 December 2019
Southeast Asian Games at the Royce Hotel, Mabalacat, Philippines. Vietnam’s Pham Hong Anh in action during her single dance final.
Reuters

42/50 30 November 2019
A woman holds a coloured flag at the Botswana Pride Parade in Gaborone. The parade is the first one organised in Botswana, after the Court ruled on June 11 in favour of decriminalising homosexuality, which had been punishable by a jail term of up to seven years.
AFP via Getty

43/50 29 November 2019
A child holds a placard during a ‘drop dead’ flashmob protest against climate change consequences at Lumpini Park in Bangkok, Thailand
Reuters

44/50 28 November 2019
Pro-democracy protesters hold an SOS sign and US national flags during a Thanksgiving rally in Edinburgh Place, Hong Kong. Protesters were thanking US President Donald Trump for signing into a law ‘The Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act Hong Kong’, provoking an angry backlash from the Chinese government. Hong Kong is in its sixth month of mass protests, which were originally triggered by a now withdrawn extradition bill, and have since turned into a wider pro-democracy movement
EPA

45/50 27 November 2019
Rescuers with a dog search through the rubble of a collapsed building after an earthquake in Durres, western Albania
AP

46/50 26 November 2019
A shepherd leads a flock of sheep on a pontoon bridge in Allahabad
AFP via Getty

47/50 25 November 2019
North Korean leader Kim Jong Un inspects a female company belonging to 5492 troops
KCNA via Reuters

48/50 24 November 2019
A protester jumps between burning tires during ongoing anti-government protests in Basra, Iraq
Reuters

49/50 23 November 2019
Fans dressed as Star Wars characters during day three of the first Test between Australia and Pakistan at The Gabba in Australia
Getty

50/50 22 November 2019
Pope Francis speaks with religious leaders during a meeting at the Chulalongkorn University in Bangkok, Thailand
Reuters

1/50 10 January 2020
Vets and volunteers treat koalas at Kangaroo Island Wildlife Park, southwest of Adelaide, Australia
AAP Image/Reuters

2/50 9 January 2020
Devotees follow the carriage transporting the statue of the Black Nazarene during an annual religious procession in its honour in Manila. Thousands of barefoot devotees joined the religious procession hoping to touch a centuries-old icon of Jesus Christ, called the Black Nazarene, which is believed to have miraculous powers
AFP via Getty

3/50 8 January 2020
People stand near the wreckage after a Ukrainian plane carrying 176 passengers crashed near Imam Khomeini airport in Tehran
ISNA/AFP via Getty

4/50 7 January 2020
Mourners gather around a vehicle carrying the coffin of Iranian top general Qasem Soleimani during the final stage of funeral processions, in his hometown Kerman. Soleimani was killed outside Baghdad airport Friday in a drone strike ordered by US President Donald Trump, ratcheting up tensions with Iran which has vowed “severe revenge”. The assassination of the 62-year-old heightened international concern about a new war in the Middle East and rattled financial markets
AFP via Getty

5/50 6 January 2020
Actor Rose McGowan speaks at a news conference outside a Manhattan courthouse after the arrival of Harvey Weinstein, in New York. Weinstein is on trial on charges of rape and sexual assault, more than two years after a torrent of women began accusing him of misconduct
AP

6/50 5 January 2020
Mourners march behind a vehicle carrying the coffins of slain major general Qassem Soleimani and others as they pay homage in the Iranian city of Mashhad
Tasnim News/AFP/Getty

7/50 4 January 2020
Rescue personnel search for bodies among mud and debris following a landslide caused by heavy rain in West Java, Indonesia
EPA

8/50 3 January 2020
A burning vehicle at the Baghdad International Airport is seen following an airstrike in Baghdad, Iraq. The Pentagon said Thursday that the US military has killed Gen. Qassem Soleimani, the head of Iran’s elite Quds Force, at the direction of President Donald Trump

AP

9/50 2 January 2020
Boats are pulled ashore as smoke and wildfires rage behind Lake Conjola, Australia. Thousands of tourists fled Australia’s wildfire-ravaged eastern coast ahead of worsening conditions as the military started to evacuate people trapped on the shore further south
Robert Oerlemans via AP

10/50 1 January 2020
Photographer Matt Roberts reacts to seeing his sister’s house destroyed by a bushfire in Quaama, New South Wales, Australia
EPA

11/50 31 December 2019
A man rides a donkey cart against the last setting sun of 2019 in Lahore, Pakistan
Reuters

12/50 30 December 2019
A Skycrane drops water on a bushfire in Bundoora, Melbourne, Australia. According to local media reports, thousands of residents and tourists were forced to evacuate in the state of Victoria as soaring temperatures and winds fanned several bushfires around the state
EPA

13/50 29 December 2019
A jumper soars through the air during a trial jump at the first stage of the 68th four hills ski jumping tournament in Oberstdorf, Germany
AP

14/50 28 December 2019
Revellers dressed in mock military garb throw eggs as they take part in the “Els Enfarinats” battle in the southeastern Spanish town of Ibi on December 28, 2019. – During this 200-year-old traditional festival participants known as Els Enfarinats (those covered in flour) dress in military clothes and stage a mock coup d’etat as they battle using flour, eggs and firecrackers outside the city town hall as part of the celebrations of the Day of the Innocents, a traditional day in Spain for pulling pranks.
AFP via Getty

15/50 27 December 2019
The Panamanian-flag cargo ship “Zelek Star” is pictured after being washed up on a beach in the southern Israeli coastal city of Ashdod during a storm
AFP via Getty

16/50 26 December 2019
Monks wearing solar filter glasses watch the “ring of fire” solar eclipse at the Gaden monastery in a Tibetan colony in Teginkoppa, India
AFP via Getty

17/50 25 December 2019
A participant in a Darth Vader costume jumps into the water during the 110th edition of the ‘Copa Nadal’ (Christmas Cup) swimming competition in Barcelona’s Port Vell. The traditional 200-meter Christmas swimming race included more than 300 participants on Barcelona’s old harbour
AFP/Getty

18/50 24 December 2019
Children dressed as Santa Claus during celebrations on Christmas Eve at a school in Amritsar
AFP via Getty

19/50 23 December 2019
Palestinians wearing Christmas costumes distribute gifts to children seated atop the rubble of a house demolished by Israel, reportedly for not being built with official licensing in the village of al-Khader, west of of Bethlehem in the occupied West Bank
AFP via Getty

20/50 22 December 2019
A journalist gets pepper-sprayed after a heated exchange with police during a rally in Hong Kong to show support for the Uighur minority in China. Hong Kong riot police broke up a solidarity rally for China’s Uighurs — with one officer drawing a pistol — as the city’s pro-democracy movement likened their plight to that of the oppressed Muslim minority
AFP via Getty

21/50 21 December 2019
Children react as a Bengal tiger licks the glass surrounding its enclosure during the “Animal Christmas Party”, where the youths were treated to a tour of the Malabon Zoo, in Manila
AFP via Getty

22/50 20 December 2019
In this long exposure photo, the United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket carrying the Boeing Starliner crew capsule lifts off on an orbital flight test to the International Space Station from Cape Canaveral
AP

23/50 19 December 2019
A freediver wearing a Father Christmas outfit poses underwater off the coast of the northern city of Batroun
AFP via Getty

24/50 18 December 2019
People rally in support of the impeachment of US President Donald Trump in front of the US Capitol, as the House readies for the historic vote
AFP via Getty

25/50 17 December 2019
Protesters set fire to dumpsters and tires as they block a road in the southern Lebanese city of Sidon
AFP via Getty

26/50 16 December 2019
People ride a merry-go-round at the Christmas Market at the Red Square in Moscow
AFP via Getty

27/50 15 December 2019
The Red Rebels, part of the Extinction Rebellion Australia demonstrator group, participate in a climate protest rally in Sydney. The group rallied in front of the landmark Sydney Opera House demanding urgent climate action from Australia’s government, as bushfire smoke choking the city caused health problems to spike
AFP via Getty

28/50 14 December 2019
Protesters block a road after setting buses on fire during a demonstration against the Indian government’s Citizenship Amendment Bill in Howrah, on the outskirts of Kolkata, India. Protests against a divisive new citizenship law raged on as Washington and London issued travel warnings for northeast India following days of violent clashes that have killed two people so far
AFP via Getty

29/50 13 December 2019
A huge cloud of black smoke raises over a burning warehouse in the southern outskirts of Moscow. There were no immediate reports of any casualties, but one fire fighter was injured and 25 ambulance cars and a special air testing vehicle are at the site, they added
EPA

30/50 12 December 2019
A slow shutter speed shot shows oarsmen in traditional costume rowing during the Royal Barge Procession to mark the conclusion of the Royal Coronation ceremony, on the Chao Phraya River in Bangkok, Thailand. The ceremony honours King Rama X after his complete accession to the throne
EPA

31/50 11 December 2019
A boy inspects his damaged home after after an attack near the Bagram Air Base in Kabul, Afghanistan, A powerful suicide bombing targeted an under-construction medical facility near the main American base north of the capital
AP

32/50 10 December 2019
Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg arrives to participate in the event “Unite behind the science” within the UN Climate Change Conference COP25 in Madrid
AFP via Getty

33/50 9 December 2019
White Island (Whakaari) volcano, as it erupts, in the Bay of Plenty, New Zealand. According to police, at least five people have died in the volcanic erruption
EPA/Michael Schade

34/50 8 December 2019
People gather amidst the ruins of a building, destroyed during reported Syrian regime and Russian air strikes the previous day in the town of Balyun. The reported air raids killed 19 civilians, eight of them children, in the country’s last major opposition bastion
AFP via Getty

35/50 7December 2019
A French CGT unionist holds up the union’s flag as he demonstrates against unemployment amidst smoke bombs in Nantes. The most serious nationwide strike to hit France in years caused new misery for weekend travellers, with defiant unions dismissing proposals by the government and warning walkouts would last well into next week
AFP via Getty

36/50 6 December 2019
People stand on top of a collapsed six-storey building in Nairobi, Kenya. Local media reported that several people are feared trapped as the rescue operation continues
EPA

37/50 5 December 2019
Indonesia players celebrate a point during their match against Vietnam in the women’s volleyball preliminary round of the Southeast Asian Games being held in the Philippines
Reuters

38/50 4 December 2019
Firefighters work to contain a large fire at an industrial building at Inlet Road inn Auckland, New Zealand
Getty

39/50 3 December 2019
Doan Quynh Nam Tran of Vietnam competes in the women’s gymnastics at the SEA Games (Southeast Asian Games) in Manila
AFP via Getty

40/50 2 December 2019
A youth plays on foamy discharge, caused by pollutants, as it mixes with the surf at a beach in Chennai
AFP via Getty

41/50 1 December 2019
Southeast Asian Games at the Royce Hotel, Mabalacat, Philippines. Vietnam’s Pham Hong Anh in action during her single dance final.
Reuters

42/50 30 November 2019
A woman holds a coloured flag at the Botswana Pride Parade in Gaborone. The parade is the first one organised in Botswana, after the Court ruled on June 11 in favour of decriminalising homosexuality, which had been punishable by a jail term of up to seven years.
AFP via Getty

43/50 29 November 2019
A child holds a placard during a ‘drop dead’ flashmob protest against climate change consequences at Lumpini Park in Bangkok, Thailand
Reuters

44/50 28 November 2019
Pro-democracy protesters hold an SOS sign and US national flags during a Thanksgiving rally in Edinburgh Place, Hong Kong. Protesters were thanking US President Donald Trump for signing into a law ‘The Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act Hong Kong’, provoking an angry backlash from the Chinese government. Hong Kong is in its sixth month of mass protests, which were originally triggered by a now withdrawn extradition bill, and have since turned into a wider pro-democracy movement
EPA

45/50 27 November 2019
Rescuers with a dog search through the rubble of a collapsed building after an earthquake in Durres, western Albania
AP

46/50 26 November 2019
A shepherd leads a flock of sheep on a pontoon bridge in Allahabad
AFP via Getty

47/50 25 November 2019
North Korean leader Kim Jong Un inspects a female company belonging to 5492 troops
KCNA via Reuters

48/50 24 November 2019
A protester jumps between burning tires during ongoing anti-government protests in Basra, Iraq
Reuters

49/50 23 November 2019
Fans dressed as Star Wars characters during day three of the first Test between Australia and Pakistan at The Gabba in Australia
Getty

50/50 22 November 2019
Pope Francis speaks with religious leaders during a meeting at the Chulalongkorn University in Bangkok, Thailand
Reuters

Why Australia’s burning
In reading James Dyke’s piece “Australia is being burned by the climate crisis – so why does it keep denying it?” I am struck by the mistake everyone is making about this ongoing disaster, which means continued errors will be made amounting to a perversion of the truth.
While it is true to say that the effect of global warming makes the probability of worsening frequencies year on year more likely, it can not be blamed wholly for the severity of the disaster now unfolding in New South Wales and Victoria.

There is ample evidence available online that the severity of this season’s fires has been consequent on forgetting the lessons of history, mainly thanks to direct governmental reduction of spend on fire safety measures and subsequent failures of proven, prudent forest management practices.
To name just a few factors, firefighting staff have been reduced, investment in fire suppression hardware neglected, preventative controlled burning significantly reduced, underbrush clear up neglected and fire control access roads poorly maintained.

Australia has over a century of recorded forest fire tragedies, and there has always been a high risk. Typically Eucalyptus trees are highly susceptible to fire, and an Australian Government Briefing (Current Issues Brief no. 8 2002-03) sets out the management case beautifully. If its recommendations had been adopted subsequently then we may well not be having this particular tragedy to discuss.

Please can we not just jump on the bandwagon, rather treat both issues on their own merits. 
Climate change is an urgent crisis in its own right, but so too is good governance, and these fires have probably been far, far worse than they ever needed to be because the lessons of history have been forgotten – probably for populistic reasons and short-term policy.
Jennifer RorrisonAddress provided

An ironic demise
As Karl Marx observed, “History repeats itself, first as tragedy, second as farce.”
It was the downing of Flight 655 (an Iranian passenger plane full of pilgrims) by the gung-ho crew of the USS Vincennes which first brought Qasem Soleimani to international attention. 
As a colonel in the Guardians of the Islamic Revolution, he was part of the Iranian delegation that engaged Ahmed Jibril, the Syrian head of the PFLP-GC, to carry out the tit-for-tat destruction of Pan Am 103. The start of a stellar career, Soleimani was to become Iran’s chief terrorist mastermind before he was assassinated on the orders of US President Trump.
It’s beyond irony that his rise was marked by the tragedy of Flight 655 while his fall may have been marked by the farce of an equally nervy and inept Iranian missile crew shooting down a Ukrainian tourist plane as it left Tehran’s international airport.
Dr John CameronSt Andrews

A change of scene
Let Meghan and Harry be Meghan and Harry. The royals don’t need them – unless they get caught in some awful accident, William and Kate’s nuclear family takes the pressure off Harry to be the “spare” to William’s heir.
If I were them I’d find a way to give 90% of my money away to good causes and then spend the last 10% on myself, in Meghan’s case topping it up with on-screen odd jobs. I thought she did a good job on Suits – let’s hope she gets the lead in a Netflix show of her own (with Harry cameo of course).
Gisette HornchurchCowes
Overpaid, overfed, and over here
Since Donald Trump became president, I have started to question the benefit of our special relationship with America, which historically has always tended to benefit the US rather than the UK. Doubts must even be creeping in with the senior members of the Royal family.
First, Wallace Simpson stole the heart of Edward VIII leading to his inevitable abdication. Now another American seems to be causing ructions following Prince Harry’s recent public announcement that the Sussexes will be extricating themselves from the firm and spending more time in America, of all places.
I fear this year could be yet another annus horribilis for the Royal family.
Christopher Learmont-Hughes​Wirral

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Public Health England delays FA Cup games to encourage mental health mindfulness- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

Public Health England has teamed up with the FA Cup to delay its third round of fixtures this weekend (4 January) by one minute to instead encourage fans to focus on their mental health.
The historic first is part of the government body’s ‘Every Mind Matters’ initiative which directs people to an NHS advice service with tools designed to help people better manage their mental health and wellbeing.
Heads Together, the project spearheaded by The Royal Foundation of The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and The Duke and Duchess of Sussex looks to tackle stigma and change the conversation on mental health via fundraising for crucial services.
It has a season-long Heads Up partnership with the FA. This rallies around a minute-long film narrated by Prince William, starring famous faces from the world of football including Frank Lampard, Harry Maguire and Alex Scott.
Using football as a platform to drive discussion on mental health, the spot asks fans to ‘take a minute’ to consider their own wellbeing and act if needed. While the collaboration is aimed at everyone, including players, supporters, friends and families, the FA has recognised that the beautiful game can be a powerful way to reach men in particular.
Of the 15 million-plus football fans in England, 69% are men, and Public Health England’s research has shown that men are less likely than women to seek help or take self-care actions for early signs of common mental health concerns.
The film will be played across stadiums, broadcast and social media as kick-off times across all Emirates FA Cup Third Round fixtures are delayed by 60 seconds from Saturday (4 January).
Matchday collateral, including programme advertorial and LED boards will underline the message, and national and regional PR, TV, VOD and targeted social media activity during the FA Cup Third Round fixtures will extend reach.
The ‘Every Mind Matters’ platform initially launched in October 2019 with a one-off broadcast of a three-minute film narrated by The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and The Duke and Duchess of Sussex.
Since the film was launched via a roadblock across ITV, Channel 4 and Sky channels, over a million ‘Mind Plans’ have been completed, using a free, NHS-assured tool from Every Mind Matters.

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‘Mental fitness’ startup Elevate Labs launches a personalized meditation app called Balance – gpgmail


While investors are already writing big checks for meditation startups, Elevate Labs founder and CEO Jesse Pickard said that none of the existing meditation apps can replace the experience of working with a human coach.

“This experience where you have somebody that meets with you is wildly better than any digital product that’s out there,” Pickard said. “The problem is, it’s not affordable to 99% of the planet.”

So Elevate Labs is launching a new mobile app today called Balance, which is designed to replicate the experience of working with a live meditation coach.

“Even with meditation increasingly getting into the mainstream, it’s a fairly difficult practice to adhere to,” Pickard said. “We take away a lot of that indecision and present you with a path that is unique to you … People live all sorts of different lives: Some people care about stress, some people care about sleep, some people care about focus. But when you and I go into any of the other major apps, we’re getting the exact same recording.”

With Balance, on the other hand, you’re not just browsing through a library of prerecorded content. Instead, the app starts out by asking you about your goals, your meditation experience and more. You’ll then get a set of introductory meditations that may look familiar, but Pickard said that each meditation is actually “a combination of dozens and dozens of clips woven together that’s personalized to you.”

For example, I told the app that I already had experience with meditation, and that my top goal was to stay focused. As a result, my first meditation skipped most of the introductory explanations, and the main exercise was designed to help me focus on the sound of my breath.

Pickard said the app will continue to ask you questions about your experience over time, which in turn will lead to more personalization. The meditations are narrated by coach Leah Santa Cruz, who’s also involved in writing the content, and there are other meditation experts on the Balance team.

The app’s initial 10-day course is free. After that, to get access to additional meditations, you’ll need to pay $11.99 per month, $49.99 per year or $199.99 for a lifetime subscription. In addition to the meditations, Balance also includes a guided activity designed to help people sleep.

On top of launching a new app, Elevate Labs is also announcing that it has raised a $7.1 million Series B led by Keesing Media Group, with participation from Oakhouse Partners.

Under its old name MindSnacks, the company built language-learning games before shifting focus to Elevate, a “brain training” app that has supposedly been downloaded 25 million times and won Apple’s App of the Year Award in 2014. Pickard (who, thanks to the magic of Craigslist, was my roommate for about a year when I was first starting at gpgmail) said that unlike most of the other apps that are marketed as improving your mind, Elevate focuses on trainable skills like reading, writing and math — rather than, say, improving your memory.

“We’ve been extremely careful about [not] venturing into untrainable skills — things like improving your attention span, those activities are not as provenly teachable,” he said.

It’s been a while since the company has raised outside funding — seven years since MindSnacks announced a Series A from Sequoia. Pickard said the company actually raised another bridge round in 2015, then “buckled down for a number of years and really just had to build a business that actually was sustainable.”

Apparently that’s paid off — he said Elevate Labs was cash-flow positive last year. With a total of $17.1 million in funding, the plan now is to continue supporting and growing Elevate while also launching Balance and building a whole line of related apps.

“We think there’s a really huge brand to be built around mental fitness,” Pickard said.


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Ginger, an MIT spinout providing app-based mental health coaching to workers, raises $35M – gpgmail


Mental health issues are thought to impact one in every five people in the US, and the stress of working life can be an exacerbating factor. Now, one of the startups that’s using technology to build ways to support this population has raised a significant round of funding to expand its platform to aid in getting them the help they need.

Ginger, a startup that works with organizations and their healthcare providers to provide employees with an-app based way to connect with coaches to talk through their issues and suggest ways forward, is today announcing that it has raised $35 million in a Series C round of funding, money that it will use both to expand the data science behind its therapy programs and the variety of its clinical programs; as well in terms of its business opportunities. The plan is to grow its service internationally and to more touch points beyond the employer channel, including those who access healthcare through health plans (which might include, potentially, countries with nationalised health services).

The funding is a Series C being led by WP Global Partners (an investment firm that backs both companies — for example, it also is an investor in Postmates — as well as other funds) with participation from some of a number of other new and previous high-profile investors that include City Light Capital, Nimble Ventures, LinkedIn CEO Jeff Weiner, Khosla Ventures, Kaiser Permanente Ventures, and Kapor Capital.

“As the global mental health crisis intensifies and access challenges increase, employers are searching for solutions to address the shortage of affordable, available providers,” said Russell Glass, CEO of Ginger, in a statement. “In building the world’s first virtual behavioral health system, we are reinventing the approach with instant access to care. This latest round of funding accelerates our ability to expand high-quality care — any time of day or night — to millions of people around the world.”

It brings the total raised by Ginger to $63 million, and the company is not disclosing valuation (we’re asking), but it has been growing at a very steady clip and says that over 200,000 people are able to access the service by way of their employers’ Ginger plans. Ginger says that customers include CBS, Netflix, Pinterest, Sephora, Twilio, Yelp and BuzzFeed, and it’s now active in 25 countries outside the US, including major markets like the UK, Japan, Australia, Canada and India.

Founded nearly a decade ago as a spinout from the MIT Media Lab, Ginger started life initially with a platform that would monitor a user’s smartphone interactions to detect potential mental health issues and help connect that user with someone to talk to. This lean-forward approach appears to have been retired in favor of a service that relies on the users themselves making the first move.

That first move comes in the form of text message, which an employee can send 24/7 and receive an immediate response. That in itself is notable: the traditional way of going about speaking to a counsellor or therapist that you might get through your work’s health insurance can take up to 25 days for your first appointment, Ginger notes, by which point the problem that got you interested in speaking to someone in the first place may have become significantly worse.

While some users keep their coaching — this is the word used by Ginger itself, and I think the reason is because it helps to differentiate this from in-person, more classic therapy sessions, and because the people who are trained to work with you might not actually be doctors — to texts, others may get referred up the ladder to other mediums, such as video therapy and video psychiatry with licensed clinicians.

The latter is a route that applies to some 8% of Ginger’s users, the company says, with the rest resolving issues through the text-based coaching. Time with clinicians is guaranteed to be provided within a 72-hour window.

On the other side of the issue of getting to speak to someone, Ginger also offers options for people to reach out and book coaching and therapy sessions outside of work hours (which presumably is a bonus both to the employer as well as to employees who are less keen to disrupt work or keep their therapy to themselves).

The approach seems to work: Ginger says that some 70 percent of members surveyed that have used Ginger reported “a significant reduction in symptoms of depression within 12 weeks.”

Overall, app-based and other health services that do not require a person to physically be in the same room as his/her therapist still face a perennial problem that is a hallmark of many a mental health service: they still require a person to “turn up” so to speak — that is, a person at some point needs to make the proactive effort to reach out for help, and usually continue to work on resolving the problem on a persistent and regular basis.

Tele-therapy solutions have both an advantage and disadvantage: being something you can pick up wherever and whenever makes it something that maybe we are more likely to use; but the lack of physical presence may well make it much easier for problems to be less apparent. In a sense, the mandate is even more on the likely vulnerable patient to be even more proactive as a result.

But the cost to employers of rolling out wide-scale, physical programs with licensed clinicians, as well as of having too many people off work due to mental health issues, are the rock and hard place that will likely continue to fuel significantly more development of services like Ginger’s and those of its competitors.

And that list is a long one, with other startups like Lyra Health (founded by the former CFO of Facebook Dave Ebersman), Unmind, Pacifica, Huddle, Modern Health, and Eliza all also closing in on the challenge.

Ginger’s investors believe in the mission and that its horse is one that will run the course.

“We have significant experience investing in healthcare and believe that technology is the key to solving the global mental health crisis,” said Donald Phillips, Chairman and CEO of WP Global Partners, in a statement. “As we looked to expand our portfolio, it became clear to us that there is no other company in the world that provides emotional and mental health support as quickly and effectively as Ginger does.”


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Mental health websites in Europe found sharing user data for ads – gpgmail


Research by a privacy rights advocacy group has found popular mental health websites in the EU are sharing users’ sensitive personal data with advertisers.

Europeans going online to seek support with mental health issues are having sensitive health data tracked and passed to third parties, according to Privacy International’s findings — including depression websites passing answers and results of mental health check tests direct to third parties for ad targeting purposes.

The charity used the open source Webxray tool to analyze the data gathering habits of 136 popular mental health web pages in France, Germany and the UK, as well as looking at a small sub-set of online depression tests (the top three Google search results for the phrase per country).

It has compiled its findings into a report called Your mental health for sale.

“Our findings show that many mental health websites don’t take the privacy of their visitors as seriously as they should,” Privacy International writes. “This research also shows that some mental health websites treat the personal data of their visitors as a commodity, while failing to meet their obligations under European data protection and privacy laws.”

Under Europe’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), there are strict rules governing the processing of health data — which is classified as special category personal data.

If consent is being used as the legal basis to gather this type of data the standard that must be obtained from the user is “explicit” consent.

In practice that might mean a pop-up before you take a depression test which asks whether you’d like to share your mental health with a laundry list of advertisers so they can use it to sell you stuff when you’re feeling low — also offering a clear ‘hell no’ penalty-free choice not to consent (but still get to take the test).

Safe to say, such unvarnished consent screens are as rare as hen’s teeth on the modern Internet.

But, in Europe, beefed up privacy laws are now being used to challenge the ‘data industrial complex’s systemic abuses and help individuals enforce their rights against a behavior-tracking adtech industry that regulators have warned is out of control.

Among Privacy International’s key findings are that —

  • 76.04% of the mental health web pages contained third-party trackers for marketing purposes
  • Google trackers are almost impossible to avoid, with 87.8% of the web pages in France having a Google tracker, 84.09% in Germany and 92.16% in the UK
  •  Facebook is the second most common third-party tracker after Google, with 48.78% of all French web pages analysed sharing data with Facebook; 22.73% for Germany; and 49.02 % for the UK.
  • Amazon Marketing Services were also used by many of the mental health web pages analysed (24.39% of analyzed web pages in France; 13.64 % in Germany; and 11.76% in the UK)
  • Depression-related web pages used a large number of third-party tracking cookies which were placed before users were able to express (or deny) consent. On average, PI found the mental health web pages placed 44.49 cookies in France; 7.82 for Germany; and 12.24 for the UK

European law around consent as a legal basis for processing (general) personal data — including for dropping tracking cookies — requires it to be informed, specific and freely given. This means websites that wish to gather user data must clearly state what data they intend to collect for what purpose, and do so before doing it, providing visitors with a free choice to accept or decline the tracking.

Dropping tracking cookies without even asking clearly falls foul of that legal standard. And very far foul when you consider the personal data being handled by these mental health websites is highly sensitive special category health data.

It is exceedingly difficult for people to seek mental health information and for example take a depression test without countless of third parties watching,” said Privacy International technologist Eliot Bendinelli in a statement. “All website providers have a responsibility to protect the privacy of their users and comply with existing laws, but this is particularly the case for websites that share unusually granular or sensitive data with third parties. Such is the case for mental health websites.”

Additionally, the group’s analysis found some of the trackers embedded on mental health websites are used to enable a programmatic advertising practice known as Real Time Bidding (RTB). 

This is important because RTB is subject to multiple complaints under GDPR.

These complaints argue that the systematic, high velocity trading of personal data is, by nature, inherently insecure — with no way for people’s information to be secured after it’s shared with hundreds or even thousands of entities involved in the programmatic chain, because there’s no way to control it once it’s been passed. And, therefore, that RTB fails to comply with the GDPR’s requirement that personal data be processed securely.

Complaints are being considered by regulators across multiple Member States. But this summer the UK’s data watchdog, the ICO, essentially signalled it is in agreement with the crux of the argument — putting the adtech industry on watch in an update report in which it warns that behavioral advertising is out of control and instructs the industry it must reform.

However the regulator also said it would give players “an appropriate period of time to adjust their practices”, rather than wade in with a decision and banhammers to enforce the law now.

The ICO’s decision to opt for an implied threat of future enforcement to push for reform of non-compliant adtech practices, rather than taking immediate action to end privacy breaches, drew criticism from privacy campaigners.

And it does look problematic now, given Privacy International’s findings suggest sensitive mental health data is being sucked up into bid requests and put about at insecure scale — where it could pose a serious risk to individuals’ rights and freedoms.

Privacy International says it found “numerous” mental health websites including trackers from known data brokers and AdTech companies — some of which engage in programmatic advertising. It also found some depression test websites (namely: netdoktor.de, passeportsante.net and doctissimo.fr, out of those it looked at) are using programmatic advertising with RTB.

“The findings of this study are part of a broader, much more systemic problem: The ways in which companies exploit people’s data to target ads with ever more precision is fundamentally broken,” adds Bendinelli. “We’re hopeful that the UK regulator is currently probing the AdTech industry and the many ways it uses special category data in ways that are neither transparent nor fair and often lack a clear legal basis.”

We’ve reached out to the ICO with questions.

We also asked the Internet Advertising Bureau Europe what steps it is taking to encourage reform of RTB to bring the system into compliance with EU privacy law. At the time of writing the industry association had not responded.

The IAB recently released a new version of what it refers to as a “transparency and consent management framework” intended for websites to embed to collect consent from visitors to processing their data including for ad targeting purposes — legally, the IAB contends.

However critics argue this is just another dose of business as usual ‘compliance theatre’ from the adtech industry — with users offered only phoney choices as there’s no real control over how their personal data gets used or where it ends up.

Earlier this year Google’s lead privacy regulator in Europe, the Irish DPC, opened a formal investigation into the company’s processing of personal data in the context of its online Ad Exchange — also as a result of a RTB complaint filed in Ireland.

The DPC said it will look at each stage of an ad transaction to establish whether the ad exchange is processing personal data in compliance with GDPR — including looking at the lawful basis for processing; the principles of transparency and data minimisation; and its data retention practices.

The outcome of that investigation remains to be seen. (Fresh fuel has just today been poured on with the complainant submitting new evidence of their personal data being shared in a way they allege infringes the GDPR.)

Increased regulatory attention on adtech practices is certainly highlighting plenty of legally questionable and ethically dubious stuff — like embedded tracking infrastructure that’s taking liberal notes on people’s mental health condition for ad targeting purposes. And it’s clear that EU regulators have a lot more work to do to deliver on the promise of GDPR.




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Torch CEO and Well Clinic founder Cameron Yarbrough on mental health & coaching – gpgmail


There has long been a stigma associated with therapy and mental health coaching, a stigma that is even more pronounced in the business world, despite considerable evidence of the efficacy of these services. One of the organizations that has set out to change this negative association is Torch, a startup that combines the therapeutic benefits of executive coaching with data-driven analytics to track outcomes.

Yet, as Torch co-founder and CEO Cameron Yarbrough explains in this Breaking Into Startups episode, the startup wasn’t initially a tech-oriented enterprise. At first, Yarbrough drew on his years of experience as a marriage and family counselor as he made the transition into executive coaching, even referring to the early iterations of Torch as little more than “a matchmaking service between coaches and professionals.”

In time, Yarbrough identified a virtually untapped market for executive coaching — one that, by his estimate, could amount to a $15 billion industry. To demonstrate to investors the great potential of this growing market, he first built up a clientele that provided Torch with sufficient recurring revenue and low churn rate.

Only then was Yarbrough able to raise a $2.4 million seed round from Initialized Capital, Y Combinator, and other investors, convincing them that data analytics software could enhance the coaching process — as well as coach recruitment — enough to effectively “productize feedback,” as he puts it.

For Yarbrough and Torch, “productizing feedback” involves certain well-known business strategies that complement traditional coaching methods. For instance, Torch’s coaching procedure includes a “360 review,” a performance review system that incorporates feedback from all angles, including an employee’s manager, peers, and other people within an organization who have knowledge of the employee’s work.

The 360 review is coupled with an OKR platform, which provides HR departments and other interested parties with the metrics and analytics to track employee progress through the program. This combination is designed to promote the development of soft skills, which in turn drive leadership.

Torch has achieved considerable success, landing several influential clients in the tech sector through its B2B approach. But Yarbrough is clear that his goal with the company is to “democratize” access to professional coaching, in hopes of providing the same kind of mental health counseling and support to employees in all levels of an organization.

In this episode, Yarbrough discusses the history and trajectory of Torch, his experience scaling a company many considered unscalable, and the methods he uses to manage his own emotional and mental health as the CEO of an expanding startup. Yarbrough offers insights into the feelings of anxiety and dread common among entrepreneurs and provides a close look at how he has found business and personal success with Torch.


Breaking Into Startups: There’s a difference between a mentor and a coach. Today, I want to talk about that difference and in addition to the intersection between business and psychology, What Cameron Yarbrough, CEO of Torch and Founder of Well Clinic.

If you’re someone that is looking for a mentor or a coach as you break into tech, or if you just want to be surrounded by peers, make sure you download the Career Karma app by going to www.breakingintostartups.com/download.

On today’s episode, you’re going to understand the importance of therapy, mental health and coaches, as well as how historically, it has been inaccessible to people and how Cameron is using his background to democratize this for the world.

If this is your first time listening to the Breaking Startups Podcast, make sure you leave a review on iTunes and tell your friends. Listen to it on Soundcloud and talk about it on Spotify. If you have any feedback for us, positive or negative, please let us know. Without further ado, let’s break-in.

Cameron Yarbrough is the CEO of Torch. He’s one of the best executive coaches in the world. Not only are we going to be talking about coaching and mentoring for executives, but we’ll also be talking about coaching in general for everyone. We’re going to go into how he created his company.


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