Trump’s greatest ally in the coming election? Facebook | John Harris | Opinion- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

If you want to know why the worst president in US history currently stands a very good chance of winning again, consider a few facts. Donald Trump’s re-election campaign is already in full flow, brimming with cash, drenching social media with targeted ads, and reaping oceans of data on voters.
The impeachment drama is, predictably enough, the perfect opportunity to put out material that plays to the idea of Trump as a noble maverick, struggling against the liberal conspiracy implied by his online questionnaires: “Do you agree that President Trump has done nothing wrong? Do you believe the Democrats will try and make up LIES to impeach the president?”
The Democrats’ most likely challenger, by contrast, made headlines last year when he cut his online ad budget, and decided to concentrate on TV advertising: a very odd decision by Joe Biden, but there we are.
What really helps Trump is Facebook. Last October, it became clear that, whatever its collective remorse about the role it had played in Trump’s election three years before, Mark Zuckerberg’s company had quietly exempted advertising by parties and candidates from its regulations on truth and falsehood. After the flurry of criticism that followed, there was speculation that Facebook might shift – on both that policy, and the kind of micro-targeting of adverts that makes it almost impossible to scrutinise what a candidate is saying to voters, and why (the Trump campaign is currently reckoned to be launching more than 1,000 new micro-targeted Facebook ads every day).
But earlier this month there came confirmation that on these two crucial points, company policy was going to remain unchanged.
Cosmetically at least, some other internet giants have been tightening up. Not that it absolves Twitter of much of the blame for spreading hatred and misinformation – or indeed, hosting Trump’s personal feed – but in October last year it banned almost all political advertising. Again, Google is hardly free of responsibility for encouraging the worst kind of online politicking, but it has stopped political advertisers targeting people based on their political affiliation, and promised to take action against “demonstrably false claims”.
Facebook, by contrast, isn’t moving. It may have shone some light on political ads via new transparency tools, announced that users will now have the option of seeing fewer ads about “political and social issues”, and increased its efforts against foreign interference, but the most egregious aspect of the way it treats politics remains untouched.
When I contacted the company’s press office, I received an email from a global “CEO advisory firm” called Teneo that requested I paraphrase Facebook’s company line – that it is not its role to “referee” political debates and prevent politicians’ messages reaching their intended audience; and that targeted ads are considered a good thing not just by political campaigns, but charities and NGOs. Self-evidently, the problem with that defence is that it leaves candidates and campaigns free to lie with impunity, and micro-targeting makes doing so even more mouthwatering.
An example: in October last year, Trump’s organisation released an ad falsely alleging that Biden had offered the Ukrainian authorities $1bn if they dropped an investigation into a company linked to his son. CNN refused to air it; Facebook had no such qualms. There will be plenty more of this stuff.

It is interesting to note that Facebook’s hands-off approach to political lying has reportedly been endorsed by Peter Thiel, the Trump-backing billionaire who sits on Facebook’s board. If you want to understand the kind of thinking he supports, a good place to start is the recent leaked memo written by Andrew “Boz” Bosworth, Facebook’s “augmented and virtual reality vice-president”. Trump won three years ago, he says, because “he ran the single best digital ad campaign I’ve ever seen from any advertiser”, and this year Facebook’s ad policies “very well [sic] may lead to the same result”.
When it comes to the relevance of Facebook’s political ads policy to Trump’s chances, Bosworth goes all mystical. “I find myself thinking of the Lord of the Rings at this moment,” he says. “Specifically when Frodo offers the ring to Galadriel and she imagines using the power righteously, at first, but knows it will eventually corrupt her. As tempting as it is to use the tools available to us to change the outcome, I am confident we must never do that or we will become that which we fear.”
But what of the fact that Facebook’s algorithms privilege the most hysterical, mendacious, loathsome kind of political discourse? “The algorithms are primarily exposing the desires of humanity itself, for better or worse,” says Bosworth, going on to claim that “corporate paternalism” is not the answer, and that “giving people tools to make their own decisions is good, but trying to force decisions upon them rarely works (for them or for you)”. Facebook, in other words, just presents you with the poison, often in a micro-targeted form that makes it even more tempting: if you want to imbibe it, that’s up to you. In this vision, Tolkien-esque cod-philosophy is less relevant than reckless libertarianism. Such is the variety of corporate responsibility offered by arguably the most powerful corporation in the world.
The traditional media might still understand elections in terms of speeches, campaign launches and set-piece interviews. But as evidenced by Boris Johnson’s victory after weeks of eluding any meaningful scrutiny, this is not where politics really happens any more. Facebook offers a dual enticement to campaigns and candidates: you can spend no end of money spreading falsehoods, and also be assured that you are using the most effective means of political communication anyone has ever invented.
It hardly absolves Labour of its serial failures, but this formula was right at the heart of the Tory win in December: towards the end of the election, it was revealed that 88% of Conservative advertisements published on Facebook over a four-day period contained claims deemed to be misleading by Full Fact, a fact-checking organisation used by Facebook itself (the figure for Labour material was 7%).
Honourable debate might have symbolically breathed its last on the occasion in 2008 when Senator John McCain silenced an audience member at one of his rallies when she implied that Barack Obama was not American. There may well be chilling auguries of the future in the kind of facts pointed out last week by my colleague Emily Bell – that the Indian prime minister, Narendra Modi, an expert at internet politics, has never held a press conference, that the White House press secretary has not delivered a public briefing in six months – and, for that matter, that the new British government apparently wants precious little to do with mainstream news and current affairs programmes.
We are, it seems, in the opening stages of a completely new age, in which victory will usually go, as the New York Times put it the other day, to those who specialise in “emotionally charged, hyper-partisan content, regardless of its factual accuracy”, and very nasty techniques indeed: witness the 2016 Trump campaign targeting anti-Hillary Clinton material at black Democrat supporters via Facebook, so as to suppress turnout.
Something lodges itself in my head anew every time I write about Facebook: that even if it began with benign intentions, it has long since failed to match its power with the commensurate responsibility. After a fashion, Zuckerberg himself seems to agree that there is a case for action. “There are a number of areas where I believe governments establishing clearer rules would be helpful, including around elections, harmful content, privacy, and data portability,” he said in his recent new year message.
What is actually required is enforced break-up, tight subsequent regulation and the belated realisation that Facebook has come close to tearing democracy to pieces in the name of bringing people closer together – all thoughts now fashionable among people at the top of the Democratic party. Facebook’s unprecedented corporate power, however, offers an answer to that: the fact that Trump may well beat whichever Democrat is selected to challenge him, using all the shadowy sophistry Facebook puts at his disposal.
• John Harris is a Guardian columnist

Tempemail , Tempmail Temp email addressess (10 minutes emails)– When you want to create account on some forum or social media, like Facebook, Reddit, Twitter, TikTok you have to enter information about your e-mail box to get an activation link. Unfortunately, after registration, this social media sends you dozens of messages with useless information, which you are not interested in. To avoid that, visit this Temp mail generator: tempemail.co and you will have a Temp mail disposable address and end up on a bunch of spam lists. This email will expire after 10 minute so you can call this Temp mail 10 minute email. Our service is free! Let’s enjoy!

Hypocrisy is at the heart of Facebook’s refusal to ban false political advertising | John Naughton | Opinion – Blog – 10 minute

On 20 December last, Andrew Bosworth, a long-time Facebook executive and buddy of the company’s supreme leader, Mark Zuckerberg, published a longish memo on the company’s internal network. The New York Times somehow obtained a copy and reported it on 7 January, which led Mr Bosworth then to publish it to the world on a Facebook page. In one of those strange coincidences that mark a columnist’s life, I happened to be reading his memo at the same time that I was delving into the vast trove of internal emails released by the Boeing Company in connection with congressional and other inquiries into the 737 Max disaster. Both sources turn out to have one interesting thing in common – the insight they provide into the internal culture of two gigantic, dysfunctional companies.

Trump got elected because he ran the single best digital ad campaign I’ve ever seen from any advertiser. Period

Andrew Bosworth

The Boeing trove consists largely of email exchanges between the engineers working on the 737 Max. They confirm that employees knew about the chronic problems with the plane’s design and were aware of the extent to which the Federal Aviation Administration was in the dark about them. Some of the exchanges are graphic. In one – on 16 November 2016 – an employee flying the Max simulator reports that the MCAS autopilot software, which is believed to have caused the two fatal crashes of the plane, is continually frustrating his attempts to control it. “It’s running rampant in the sim [simulator] on me,” he emails a colleague. “I’m levelling off at like 4,000 feet and the plane is trimming itself like crazy.” This is the behaviour that the pilots on the two doomed flights experienced: they kept on trying to keep the nose up while the software continually overrode them and turned it down. And people within the company knew about it three years earlier.
When Boeing releases a flawed product on to the market, people die in terrifying accidents. I was going to say that when Facebook does the same, at least no one dies. But that’s not quite true, as survivors of the Rohingya genocide in Myanmar can testify. Interestingly, Bosworth, who continually flaunts his “liberal” credentials, does not mention Myanmar in his memo, but focuses instead on the 2016 US presidential election, when he was head of Facebook’s advertising operation. He maintains that almost all media coverage of the company’s influence in that electoral contest (including our coverage) was misguided or uninformed. Cambridge Analytica were “snake-oil salespeople”, the Russians spent much less than the official campaigns, the power of micro-targeted advertising was overrated, etc, etc.
But was Facebook nevertheless responsible for Donald Trump getting elected? “I think the answer is yes,” says Bosworth, “but not for the reasons anyone thinks. He didn’t get elected because of Russia or misinformation or Cambridge Analytica. He got elected because he ran the single best digital ad campaign I’ve ever seen from any advertiser. Period.” Trump’s crowd apparently “did unbelievable work. They weren’t running misinformation or hoaxes. They weren’t microtargeting or saying conflicting things to different people on the same topic. They just used the tools we had to show the right creative to each person. The use of custom audiences, video, e-commerce and fresh creative remains the high-water mark of digital ad campaigns in my opinion.” Result: President Trump.
This brings Bosworth to the present moment, where Facebook’s advertising policies remain unchanged. “It occurs to me,” he burbles, “that it very well may lead to the same result. As a committed liberal I find myself desperately wanting to pull any lever at my disposal to avoid the same result. So what stays my hand?”
There then follows some ludicrous flapdoodle about The Lord of the Rings and the philosopher John Rawls’s idea of considering such profound questions from behind a “veil of ignorance”. (I am not making this up.) This then leads to the conclusion that Bosworth should do nothing except ensure it is business as usual, even if that leads to Trump’s re-election.
And that’s OK, apparently, because if people are taken in by political propaganda then that’s their problem, just as people who become addicted to tobacco, sugar or opioids ultimately bear the responsibility for their plights. But, Bosworth continues, in a vein that really defies satire, “while Facebook may not be nicotine I think it is probably like sugar. Sugar is delicious and for most of us there is a special place for it in our lives. But like all things it benefits from moderation. At the end of the day, we are forced to ask what responsibility individuals have for themselves.”
So, ultimately, it’s not Facebook’s responsibility to, say, ban political advertising that is demonstrably misleading or malevolently false. This has the convenient result of enabling Bosworth to burnish his liberal credentials behind that Rawlsian veil while the money rolls in. There’s an old English word for this: hypocrisy. If he ever needs another job, I’m sure there’s a place for him at Boeing.
What I’m reading
Sticking pointThere is a nice essay by John Kay on his blog about whether Adam Smith ever actually visited a pin factory (the economist used one to explain the division of labour in The Wealth of Nations). Answer: probably not, but it doesn’t matter because his sources were good.
Twitter ye notAn article about our recent election in the Atlantic declares “the Twitter electorate isn’t the real electorate”. I wish more journalists understood that.
Snap judgment There’s an interesting New York Times review of a new exhibition, arguing that “photography was Andy Warhol’s secret weapon”.

Tempemail , Tempmail Temp email addressess (10 minutes emails)– When you want to create account on some forum or social media, like Facebook, Reddit, Twitter, TikTok you have to enter information about your e-mail box to get an activation link. Unfortunately, after registration, this social media sends you dozens of messages with useless information, which you are not interested in. To avoid that, visit this Temp mail generator: tempemail.co and you will have a Temp mail disposable address and end up on a bunch of spam lists. This email will expire after 10 minute so you can call this Temp mail 10 minute email. Our service is free! Let’s enjoy!

We’re approaching the limits of computer power – we need new programmers now | John Naughton | Opinion – Blog – 10 minute

Way back in the 1960s, Gordon Moore, the co-founder of Intel, observed that the number of transistors that could be fitted on a silicon chip was doubling every two years. Since the transistor count is related to processing power, that meant that computing power was effectively doubling every two years. Thus was born Moore’s law, which for most people working in the computer industry – or at any rate those younger than 40 – has provided the kind of bedrock certainty that Newton’s laws of motion did for mechanical engineers.
There is, however, one difference. Moore’s law is just a statement of an empirical correlation observed over a particular period in history and we are reaching the limits of its application. In 2010, Moore himself predicted that the laws of physics would call a halt to the exponential increases. “In terms of size of transistor,” he said, “you can see that we’re approaching the size of atoms, which is a fundamental barrier, but it’ll be two or three generations before we get that far – but that’s as far out as we’ve ever been able to see. We have another 10 to 20 years before we reach a fundamental limit.”
We’ve now reached 2020 and so the certainty that we will always have sufficiently powerful computing hardware for our expanding needs is beginning to look complacent. Since this has been obvious for decades to those in the business, there’s been lots of research into ingenious ways of packing more computing power into machines, for example using multi-core architectures in which a CPU has two or more separate processing units called “cores” – in the hope of postponing the awful day when the silicon chip finally runs out of road. (The new Apple Mac Pro, for example, is powered by a 28-core Intel Xeon processor.) And of course there is also a good deal of frenzied research into quantum computing, which could, in principle, be an epochal development.
But computing involves a combination of hardware and software and one of the predictable consequences of Moore’s law is that it made programmers lazier. Writing software is a craft and some people are better at it than others. They write code that is more elegant and, more importantly, leaner, so that it executes faster. In the early days, when the hardware was relatively primitive, craftsmanship really mattered. When Bill Gates was a lad, for example, he wrote a Basic interpreter for one of the earliest microcomputers, the TRS-80. Because the machine had only a tiny read-only memory, Gates had to fit it into just 16 kilobytes. He wrote it in assembly language to increase efficiency and save space; there’s a legend that for years afterwards he could recite the entire program by heart.
There are thousands of stories like this from the early days of computing. But as Moore’s law took hold, the need to write lean, parsimonious code gradually disappeared and incentives changed. Programming became industrialised as “software engineering”. The construction of sprawling software ecosystems such as operating systems and commercial applications required large teams of developers; these then spawned associated bureaucracies of project managers and executives. Large software projects morphed into the kind of death march memorably chronicled in Fred Brooks’s celebrated book, The Mythical Man-Month, which was published in 1975 and has never been out of print, for the very good reason that it’s still relevant. And in the process, software became bloated and often inefficient.
But this didn’t matter because the hardware was always delivering the computing power that concealed the “bloatware” problem. Conscientious programmers were often infuriated by this. “The only consequence of the powerful hardware I see,” wrote one, “is that programmers write more and more bloated software on it. They become lazier, because the hardware is fast they do not try to learn algorithms nor to optimise their code… this is crazy!”
It is. In a lecture in 1997, Nathan Myhrvold, who was once Bill Gates’s chief technology officer, set out his Four Laws of Software. 1: software is like a gas – it expands to fill its container. 2: software grows until it is limited by Moore’s law. 3: software growth makes Moore’s law possible – people buy new hardware because the software requires it. And, finally, 4: software is only limited by human ambition and expectation.
As Moore’s law reaches the end of its dominion, Myhrvold’s laws suggest that we basically have only two options. Either we moderate our ambitions or we go back to writing leaner, more efficient code. In other words, back to the future.
What I’m readingJohn Naughton’s recommendations
What just happened?Writer and researcher Dan Wang has a remarkable review of the year in technology on his blog, including an informed, detached perspective on the prospects for Chinese domination of new tech.
Algorithm says noThere’s a provocative essay by Cory Doctorow on the LA Review of Books blog on the innate conservatism of machine-learning.
Fall of the big beasts“How to lose a monopoly: Microsoft, IBM and antitrust” is a terrific long-view essay about company survival and change by Benedict Evans on his blog.

Tempemail , Tempmail Temp email addressess (10 minutes emails)– When you want to create account on some forum or social media, like Facebook, Reddit, Twitter, TikTok you have to enter information about your e-mail box to get an activation link. Unfortunately, after registration, this social media sends you dozens of messages with useless information, which you are not interested in. To avoid that, visit this Temp mail generator: tempemail.co and you will have a Temp mail disposable address and end up on a bunch of spam lists. This email will expire after 10 minute so you can call this Temp mail 10 minute email. Our service is free! Let’s enjoy!

John McAfee backs out of promise to self-cannibalize if Bitcoin fails to hit $1 million – Blog – 10 minute

Recap: People were excited about Bitcoin back in 2017—the year when the cryptocurrency reached its peak of almost $20,000. Tech legend John McAfee was certainly optimistic about the coin’s future: he promised to eat his d*ck on national television if it didn’t reach $500,000 in three years, eventually changing that prediction to $1 million. It’s now 2020, and Bitcoin is worth around $7,700, but don’t expect to see McAfee consume his genitals anytime soon; he claims the whole thing was just a ruse.
Despite his name being synonymous with one of the world’s leading anti-virus products, most people know McAfee for his exploits outside of tech, such as being the prime suspect in a murder in Belize, his presidential run, and giving his opinion on pretty much everything. But his promise to eat his junk on TV if Bitcoin fails to reach one million dollars by December 31, 2020, has brought plenty of attention.
As noted by the website The Dickening (via TNW), Bitcoin’s price needs to increase around $992,258 this year to reach McAfee’s prediction. That works out at $2,787 per day. Surprisingly, the crypto has experienced equivalent growth surges in the past—in 2011 and 2012/2013, when its price was a lot lower—but it seems McAfee has lost confidence that his claim will come to pass.

In a recent tweet, McAfee said the whole thing was “a ruse to onboard new users. It worked.” Not surprisingly, this has invoked the anger of many Twitter and Reddit users.

Eat my dick in 12 months?
A ruse to onboard new users. It worked.
Bitcoin was first. It’s an ancient technology. All know it.
Newer blockchains have privacy, smart contracts, distributed apps and more.
Bitcoin is our future?
Was the Model T the future of the automobile?
— John McAfee (@officialmcafee) January 5, 2020

It’s unlikely that many people thought Bitcoin really would hit a million dollars, of course, whether McAfee ever believed it is up for debate, but he does have a history of pulling similar ‘ruses.’ When the FBI was trying to crack the iPhone belonging to San Bernardino shooter Syed Rizwan Farook—something Apple refused to help with—he said his team of mohawk-sporting super hackers with face tattoos could crack the handset in three weeks. He later admitted that this was a lie to bring more attention to the case.
Find out more about McAfee’s antics in our Drama, Drugs, and Data feature.

Related Reads

Tempemail , Tempmail Temp email addressess (10 minutes emails)– When you want to create account on some forum or social media, like Facebook, Reddit, Twitter, TikTok you have to enter information about your e-mail box to get an activation link. Unfortunately, after registration, this social media sends you dozens of messages with useless information, which you are not interested in. To avoid that, visit this Temp mail generator: tempemail.co and you will have a Temp mail disposable address and end up on a bunch of spam lists. This email will expire after 10 minute so you can call this Temp mail 10 minute email. Our service is free! Let’s enjoy!

John Lewis marketing boss Paula Nickolds departs before starting- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

Paula Nickolds has exited the John Lewis Partnership just weeks before she was due to start as the first joint head of brand for John Lewis and Waitrose.
The plan for Nickolds, a veteran of the high street retailer having joined in 1995 and risen to become its first ever female managing director, was announced in October as part of a major restructure intended to get it back on solid footing.
It came as the company suffered a pre-tax loss amounting to nearly £26m in the six months to 27 July, compared with a profit of £800,000 in the same period a year before.
Under chairman Charlie Mayfield’s vision to unite John Lewis and Waitrose with a simplified management structure, Nickolds was due to become executive director of brand in February, a role which would see her head up marketing, service and digital innovation.
However, it has now been announced that she will instead leave the department store chain that month after it suffered a further fall in profits.
“After some reflection on the responsibilities of her proposed new role, we have decided together that the implementation of the future partnership structure in February is the right time for her to move on,” the company said.
What this means for the future of its marketing division is unclear. At the time of the restructure announcement, representatives declined to comment on how Craig Inglis and Martin George, who hold responsibility for brand and marketing for John Lewis and Waitrose respectively under the ‘customer director’ titles, would be impacted by Nickolds’ new role.
Anusha Couttigane, principal fashion analyst at Kantar, said that whoever takes the lead will need to rethink its long-running, and arguably tired, festive advertising strategy which has relied on blockbuster, tear-jerker creative to encourage shoppers into stores.
“John Lewis needs to continue evolving its digital marketing efforts. While the company’s Christmas mascot, the accident-prone dragon Excitable Edgar, was warmly received, the debut of the brand’s Christmas advert is simply not the event it once was,” Couttigane added.
“In the digital age of streaming and on-the-go entertainment, gone are the days of a prime-time TV debut going viral (historically during Downton Abbey or some other national favourite). The retailer needs to ensure it is positioning itself to reach its biggest opportunity customers through the right channels.”
But immediate thoughts have turned to quick recovery from the crucial Christmas period after sales fell by 1.8%. Bosses at the chain are considering whether to axe the partnership bonus payment to staff for the first time in 67 years.
“Overall, the future of the John Lewis Partnership remains uncertain, with the business going through a complete structural overhaul,” continued Couttigane.

Tempemail , Tempmail Temp email addressess (10 minutes emails)– When you want to create account on some forum or social media, like Facebook, Reddit, Twitter, TikTok you have to enter information about your e-mail box to get an activation link. Unfortunately, after registration, this social media sends you dozens of messages with useless information, which you are not interested in. To avoid that, visit this Temp mail generator: tempemail.co and you will have a Temp mail disposable address and end up on a bunch of spam lists. This email will expire after 10 minute so you can call this Temp mail 10 minute email. Our service is free! Let’s enjoy!

WarnerMedia CEO John Stankey becomes COO of AT&T – gpgmail


WarnerMedia CEO John Stankey is taking on even broader responsibilities with a promotion to president and chief operating officer at AT&T (which acquired and renamed Time Warner last year).

According to the official announcement, this is a new position reporting directly to AT&T CEO Randall Stephenson. Stankey will take on the new position on October 1 while continuing to serve as WarnerMedia CEO.

“Now is the time to more tightly align our collection of world-class content, scaled consumer relationships, technical know-how and innovative advertising technology,” Stephenson said in a statement. He also described Stankey — who’s been at AT&T since 1985 — as “an outstanding executive who has led nearly every area of our business, helped shape our strategy and excelled at operations throughout his career.”

The company also announced that Jeff McElfresh will become CEO of AT&T Communications, replacing John Donovan, who is retiring. (FYI: gpgmail is owned by AT&T competitor Verizon.)

These shifts come as WarnerMedia is preparing to launch its big streaming play HBO Max next year. The service will include HBO proper, along with other streaming content. It also comes after some notable departures at WarnerMedia, including HBO’s Richard Plepler and Kevin Tsujihara of Warner Bros.


10 minutes mail – Also known by names like : 10minemail, 10minutemail, 10mins email, mail 10 minutes, 10 minute e-mail, 10min mail, 10minute email or 10 minute temporary email. 10 minute email address is a disposable temporary email that self-destructed after a 10 minutes. https://tempemail.co/– is most advanced throwaway email service that helps you avoid spam and stay safe. Try tempemail and you can view content, post comments or download something

AT&T’s CEO of Communications, John Donovan, to retire in October – gpgmail


John Donovan, CEO of AT&T Communications, announced today his plans to retire effective October 1, 2019. Donovan has for the past two years led AT&T’s largest business unit, which services 100 million mobile, broadband and pay-TV customers in the U.S., as well as millions of business customers, including nearly all the Fortune 1000.

The news comes amid several big changes in that business unit itself, and more in the broader telecom industry.

For starters, AT&T had just rebranded its over-the-top streaming service DIRECTV NOW to AT&T TV NOW, and  just last week rolled out a brand-new TV service, AT&T TV, in 10 test markets.

While DIRECTV NOW (aka AT&T TV NOW) is meant to compete with other over-the-top streaming services like Dish’s Sling TV, Hulu with Live TV, YouTube TV and others, the new AT&T TV is a more conventional — though still “over-the-top” — option that can work with any broadband connection.

However, it locks in customers to two-year contracts, requires a set-top box and has packages that range from $60-$80 per month, much like a traditional TV subscription.

Elsewhere at AT&T, its WarnerMedia division is working a streaming service of its own, HBO Max, which is meant to battle more directly with premium offerings, like Disney+ or Apple TV+, for example. AT&T also operates a low-cost streaming service, Watch TV.

And the company continues to offer pay-TV offerings like DIRECTV (satellite service) and U-verse (cable).

It seems AT&T is due to consolidate these efforts at some point, and Donovan’s departure could signal some changes on that front, perhaps. Plus, as The WSJ reported, Donovan and WarnerMedia head John Stankey had a strained relationship at times. That could because HBO Max will end up competing with other AT&T offerings and services, the report suggested.

In addition to its various streaming ambitions, AT&T is also starting to roll out 5G, a move Donovan spearheaded. The company is also preparing for competition from new players, including what arises from a T-Mobile/Sprint merger, and from Dish’s plans to enter the wireless market.

Donovan had been CEO of AT&T Communications for two years, after having joined the company as CTO in 2008. Prior to his CEO role starting in July 2017, he had been promoted to AT&T’s chief strategy officer and group president — AT&T Technology and Operations.

He previously worked at Verisign, Deloitte Consulting and InCode Telecom Group.

Donovan, 58, was nearing the company’s retirement age of 60, but his departure was still unexpected, The WSJ also said.

“It’s been my honor to lead AT&T Communications during a period of unprecedented innovation and investment in new technology that is revolutionizing how people connect with their worlds,” said John Donovan, in a statement. “All that we’ve accomplished is a credit to the talented women and men of AT&T, and their passion for serving our customers. I’m looking forward to the future – spending more time with my family and watching with pride as the AT&T team continues to set the pace for the industry.”

“JD is a terrific leader and a tech visionary who helped drive AT&T’s leadership in connecting customers, from our 5G, fiber and FirstNet buildouts, to new products and platforms, to setting the global standard for software-defined networks,” added Randall Stephenson, AT&T’s chairman and CEO. “He led the way in encouraging his team to continuously innovate and develop their skill sets for the future. We greatly appreciate his many contributions to our company’s success and his untiring dedication to serving customers and making our communities better. JD is a good friend, and I wish him and his family all the best in the years ahead.”

Disclosure: gpgmail is owned by Verizon by way of Verizon Media Services. This does not influence our reporting. 


10 minutes mail – Also known by names like : 10minemail, 10minutemail, 10mins email, mail 10 minutes, 10 minute e-mail, 10min mail, 10minute email or 10 minute temporary email. 10 minute email address is a disposable temporary email that self-destructed after a 10 minutes. https://tempemail.co/– is most advanced throwaway email service that helps you avoid spam and stay safe. Try tempemail and you can view content, post comments or download something