Blackout Tuesday dominates social media as users show solidarity | Black Lives Matter movement- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

The protest movement sparked by the death in police custody of George Floyd in Minneapolis spread from the music business to social media on Tuesday as major institutions around the world posted black squares and stopped online activity in solidarity.
The #BlackoutTuesday hashtag dominated social media, as musicians, actors, major museums, social media companies and ordinary users all took part. But the hashtag was criticised by some for being reductive.
Black squares replaced the usual barrage of colourful posts and paid-for ads on Instagram, but some refused to take part, calling the move, which started with the music industry, a “major label record executive white guilt day”, and called for people to share anti-racist literature and films instead of remaining silent.
Others, including UK rapper Awate, said the move was undemocratic and enforced on artists. He tweeted: “Instead of this performance, we should find a way to unionise and innovate methods of supporting the struggles of our people under attack. Capitalism got us here. Let’s try a collective approach.”
Ariana Grande, one of the most popular Instagram users with 189 million followers, posted a black square with links to Black Lives Matter accounts, with the caption: “Sending strength and if you are protesting today please be safe.” Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson, who has 185 million followers, simply posted a black square with the hashtags #normalizeequality and #blackouttuesday.
People taking part were reminded to not use the Black Lives Matter hashtag as protesters in the US, and worldwide, are using it to organise future protests and share information.
The artist Toyin Ojih Odutola, who was due to show at the Barbican before the Covid-19 pandemic struck, captioned her post: “Please don’t use the black lives matter hashtag, it’s to help those on the ground, and instead refer to local bail fun or international organisations.”
Many other artists also took part, including Olafur Eliasson, and Tracey Emin, who wrote: “The world is full of so much fear, and those who are in charge are making it worse and worse and worse and worse.”
Museums and galleries including the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and the Queens Museum in Brooklyn, postponed their online activities, while, on Monday, Tate posted a Chris Ofili painting in tribute to Stephen Lawrence with the caption: “Nobody should have to live in fear because of the colour of their skin.”
TikTok said it was “standing in solidarity with the Black community and the music industry” by turning off its playlists to mark what it called “the extraordinary recurrence of injustice the Black community is experiencing in the long fight against inequality, racism and violence”.
Internet radio network SiriusXM said it was silencing music channels for three minutes. The first minute “to reflect on the terrible history of racism”, the second was “in observance of this tragic moment in time” and the third “to hope for and demand a better future”.
Hip-hop label Def Jam announced that it was pausing the release, marketing and promotion of some artists’ music, while others were donating a day’s wages to various organisation “on the frontlines of this fight”.
In the UK, TV channels and radio stations changed their programmes to mark “Blackout Tuesday”.
BBC Radio 1Xtra hosted a series of discussions and debates in support of the black community, with song choices reflecting black pride, empowerment and identity. BBC Radio 1 and Radio 2 broadcast moments of reflection. Some commercial stations, including Kiss, Magic and Absolute Radio were observing a social media blackout “to stand with the black community to fight against racism and support our presenters, musicians, colleagues and listeners”.
ITV daytime show This Morning briefly went dark, showing a black screen with the words “Black Lives Matter”.
MTV planned to go silent for eight minutes – marking the length of time Floyd’s neck was knelt on. Other channels, including VH1 and Comedy Central, were planning a similar gesture, while 4 Music was pausing its output once an hour throughout the day.

Tempemail , Tempmail Temp email addressess (10 minutes emails)– When you want to create account on some forum or social media, like Facebook, Reddit, Twitter, TikTok you have to enter information about your e-mail box to get an activation link. Unfortunately, after registration, this social media sends you dozens of messages with useless information, which you are not interested in. To avoid that, visit this Temp mail generator: tempemail.co and you will have a Temp mail disposable address and end up on a bunch of spam lists. This email will expire after 10 minute so you can call this Temp mail 10 minute email. Our service is free! Let’s enjoy!

Grindr dating app removes ethnicity filter to support Black Lives Matter | Grindr – Blog – 10 minute

Grindr is removing an “ethnicity filter” from its dating app as part of its support for the Black Lives Matter movement, the company announced on Monday.
The controversial feature, limited to those who stump up £12.99 a month for the premium version of the app, allows users to sort search results based on reported ethnicity, height, weight and other characteristics.
In a statement posted to Instagram, the company said “We stand in solidarity with the #BlackLivesMatter movement and the hundreds of thousands of queer people of color who log in to our app every day.
“We will continue to fight racism on Grindr, both through dialogue with our community and a zero-tolerance policy for racism and hate speech on our platform. As part of this commitment, and based on your feedback, we have decided to remove the ethnicity filter from our next release.⁣”
Grindr’s filter had come under intense criticism over the weekend after a now-deleted tweet from the company that read “Demand Justice. #blacklivesmatter”. Many condemned the company’s show of solidarity as hollow when taken alongside the existence of a feature that allows users to explicitly discriminate based on race.
The company has long maintained that the ethnicity filter was useful for minority users who wanted to find people like themselves, rather than enforce racism.
“We decided before we were ready to pull the plug on that, it was a conversation we wanted with our user base,” Grindr’s head of communications told the Guardian in 2018. “While I believe the ethnicity filter does promote racist behaviour in the app, other minority groups use the filter because they want to quickly find other members of their minority community.”
Grindr isn’t the only dating app which allows users to filter by race, but it is by far the most prominent. Racial discrimination on the app isn’t simply enforced algorithmically, either; a 2015 study of Australian users found that 96% had seen at least one profile that included some form of racial discrimination, ‘through language such as “Not attracted to Asians.”’ One in eight of those surveyed admitted they themselves included such language.
The announcement came on the first day of Pride month, Grindr noted. “We can still come together in the spirit of Pride, but Pride this year has an added responsibility, a shifted tone, and a new priority that will be reflected in our programming – support and solidarity for queer people of color and the #BlackLivesMatter movement.”

Tempemail , Tempmail Temp email addressess (10 minutes emails)– When you want to create account on some forum or social media, like Facebook, Reddit, Twitter, TikTok you have to enter information about your e-mail box to get an activation link. Unfortunately, after registration, this social media sends you dozens of messages with useless information, which you are not interested in. To avoid that, visit this Temp mail generator: tempemail.co and you will have a Temp mail disposable address and end up on a bunch of spam lists. This email will expire after 10 minute so you can call this Temp mail 10 minute email. Our service is free! Let’s enjoy!

TikTok Promises to Promote Black Creators After Censorship Accusations Make Light | Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

Sourced from Gadgets 360.

Chinese Social Media platform TikTok laid out a series of actions on Monday in an effort to address criticisms that its algorithm is suppressing black creators on the app.
The actions include launching a “creator diversity council” in which the platform will aim at “recognising and uplifting the voices driving culture, creativity, and important conversations on the platform [itself]”. Continued in the blog post, TikTok says it will also reassess its moderation strategies, establish a new “user-friendly” appeals process, and develop a new creator portal for expanding communications and “opportunities for our broader creator community”.
TikTok says that it will “stand in solidarity with the Black community” and participate in “Black Out Tuesday.” Tuesday will be kept as a day of action against racial injustice planned by members of the music industry.

#BlackOutTuesday DOES NOT MEAN LEAVE SOCIAL MEDIA FOR THE DAY IT MEANS THIS 👇🏽 RT this NOW to inform our kinfolk! pic.twitter.com/h33vqdPEdP
— Matt Nicholas (@mattnicholas) June 2, 2020

TikTok says it will shut down its Sounds page, turning off all playlists and campaigns “to observe a moment of reflection and action.”
The Verge writes that the platform has pledged a $3 million donation to non-profits that help the black community and a separate $1 million donation to address “racial injustice and inequality”. However, TikTok did not name any specific organizations in its blog.
“We appreciate being held accountable. We know that getting to a place of trust will take work, but we are dedicated to doing our part as we continue to foster a space where everyone is seen and heard,” the company says.
According to CNN, TikTok users say they will unfollow other users who did not support the movement, and black creators asked non-black allies to follow at least one new black creator. Shortly after, and at the height of protests across the country opposing police brutality, TikTok claimed that it suffered a “technical glitch” that made it appear as though videos uploaded under the #BlackLivesMatter and #GeorgeFloyd hashtags received zero views.
On Friday TikTok still appeared to be restricting the search results of certain hashtags that had to do with the riots occurring across America. Users could still use the tags, but their videos would not show up when searching for the tags.
TikTok was previously criticised for allegedly censoring videos by creators the platform deemed to be “vulnerable to cyberbullying” – users with autism or with facial features and body types perceived to be unattractive.
Edited by Luis MonzonFollow Luis Monzon on TwitterFollow Tempemail on Twitter


Tempemail , Tempmail Temp email addressess (10 minutes emails)– When you want to create account on some forum or social media, like Facebook, Reddit, Twitter, TikTok you have to enter information about your e-mail box to get an activation link. Unfortunately, after registration, this social media sends you dozens of messages with useless information, which you are not interested in. To avoid that, visit this Temp mail generator: tempemail.co and you will have a Temp mail disposable address and end up on a bunch of spam lists. This email will expire after 10 minute so you can call this Temp mail 10 minute email. Our service is free! Let’s enjoy!

Amy Cooper: Black bird watcher speaks out about firing of white Central Park dog walker- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

The black man who was harassed by a white woman in Central Park said too much of the backlash to the situation has been focused on the woman and not on the underlying issues surrounding their encounter.
Christian Cooper was bird watching in Central Park when he asked Amy Cooper – no relation – to put her dog on a leash, as is required by park rules. The situation escalated and Ms Cooper called the police, falsely suggesting to them that Mr Cooper was posing a threat to her and her dog. During her call, she specified that an “African American man with a bicycle helmet” was recording her and threatening her dog.
Mr Cooper was filming the encounter and shared it on social media, where many users became outraged with Ms Cooper’s actions, chalking it up to another instance of a white person calling the police on African Americans without just cause.

Download the new Independent Premium app
Sharing the full story, not just the headlines
Download now

“Where she went was a racist place. That action was racist. Does that make her a racist? I can’t answer that. Only she can with what she does going forward,” Mr Cooper told the New York Daily News. “Maybe she was trying to gain an advantage. She went there, and she needs to reflect on what she did.”
The consequences for Ms Cooper came quick. In addition to becoming the object of outrage online, she was also fired from her job as head of investment solutions at Franklin Templeton where she was estimated to be making approximately $170,000 per year.

Watch more

“Following our internal review of the incident in Central Park yesterday, we have made the decision to terminate the employee involved, effective immediately,” a tweet from the Franklin Templeton Twitter account said. “We do not tolerate racism of any kind at Franklin Templeton.”
Mr Cooper said he didn’t feel that the woman losing her job was a useful tool for addressing the underlying issues at play in the encounter.
“I’m not sure how I feel about [the firing],” Mr Cooper said. “I can’t see how that addresses the underlying issues. I think it’s important to move beyond this instance and this one individual. Too much focus has been put on her when it really is about the underlying issues that have plagued this city and this country for centuries.”
Ms Cooper publicly apologised for her actions and claimed she wasn’t a racist but that she was scared.
“I’m not a racist. I did not mean to harm that man in any way,” Ms Cooper told CNN. “I think I was just scared. When you’re alone in the Ramble, you don’t know what’s happening. It’s not excusable, it’s not defensible.”

Watch more

In addition to losing her job, Ms Cooper also received death threats from angry social media users. Mr Cooper said he felt the death threats were counterproductive and wrong.
“I’m very upset she’s getting death threats. That’s antithetical to the appropriate response,” Mr Cooper said. “If you’re upset that she put my life in danger by trying to bring the cops down on a black man, then how can you turn around and make a death threat? That makes no sense. It’s downright awful.”
He said that so long as the woman’s apology was genuine and so long as she agrees to keep her dog on a leash while walking in the Ramble in the future, then “we have no issues with each other.”

Tempemail , Tempmail Temp email addressess (10 minutes emails)– When you want to create account on some forum or social media, like Facebook, Reddit, Twitter, TikTok you have to enter information about your e-mail box to get an activation link. Unfortunately, after registration, this social media sends you dozens of messages with useless information, which you are not interested in. To avoid that, visit this Temp mail generator: tempemail.co and you will have a Temp mail disposable address and end up on a bunch of spam lists. This email will expire after 10 minute so you can call this Temp mail 10 minute email. Our service is free! Let’s enjoy!

The Shiny New Object Podcast: five things I learned from Stanley Black & Decker’s Amit Thard- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

Interviewed in the latest installment of the Shiny New Object Podcast by Automated Creative’s Tom Ollerton is Amit Thard, regional head of e-commerce for South East Asia at Stanley Black & Decker. Here are five things Ollerton found out as a result of the conversation.
Get exposure, learn by doing
Thard believes the best place for marketers to start is in agencies. No one knows exactly what they want to do at age 21, and agencies give you more exposure to more areas. He’s also a big fan of proactive learning along the way – he tells me that early on in his career, he decided to get up to speed on SEO to make a bit of spending money. He enrolled in a community college course and created a website about a guy who was running for president – Barack Obama. He managed to make $15-20 a day by writing his own articles about Obama and his stance on different topics, even adjusting the tone of the site when more critical searches about various failures became popular. And learned a hell of a lot about SEO and websites along the way.
Ecommerce won’t replace retail, but evolution is needed
Thard points out that consumer behavior is changing; people – and young people in particular – are moving towards ecommerce rapidly. Meanwhile, brands are still trying to make traditional retail models work, when in many cases an online version can offer what they do, but better. He believes that traditional retail won’t be replaced by ecommerce and social, but needs to evolve to work alongside it. Those who don’t do this won’t survive in the digital world. Those who are best placed to weather the change are the brands with their own flagship online store, and who have control over their own pricing. The tech brands – Apple, Dell, Lenovo and so on are good examples, and some clothing brands like Uniqlo and H&M.
Keep your eye on AI
Thard signs up for a lot of courses, he reads ebooks. In his spare time he looks for information that’ll help him keep up to date with the latest marketing trends, whether it’s free or he has to invest in it. He says while the good stuff is hard to find, it can prove invaluable for learning. His current focus is AI and its impact on ecommerce – he believes this will be the big thing in the next 3 to 4 years. And when ecommerce is predicted to grow five-fold in South East Asia over the next few years, he wants to know the latest in this tech so he can get ahead of the competition.
Get your ecommerce logistics right
While most marketers are talking about the front end, how to have a nice online shop front and get traffic and conversation, Thard believes we need to focus on ecommerce logistics – this is his Shiny New Object. Without this backbone in place, brands can’t fulfill orders, customers are disappointed, bad reviews are left and the business will suffer. Amazon is better than anyone here, however, he also points out Chinese company Xiaomi as another good example. Thard believes that companies need to get as close as they can to the bar Amazon has set, before they can even think about innovating past them.
To save time, be blunt
Thard is very straightforward in his approach to avoiding overwhelm – he says no. A lot. Whether it’s an internal or external project, unless it will directly generate revenue (his focus), he’s not interested. He’s often approached by agencies who want to talk about brand building – he sends them to the marketing team. He’s refreshingly honest about the conversations he’ll entertain having, and those he won’t. He’s too busy to do everything, so prioritises whatever will help him with his specific goals.
Listen to the episode in full below.

Tempemail , Tempmail Temp email addressess (10 minutes emails)– When you want to create account on some forum or social media, like Facebook, Reddit, Twitter, TikTok you have to enter information about your e-mail box to get an activation link. Unfortunately, after registration, this social media sends you dozens of messages with useless information, which you are not interested in. To avoid that, visit this Temp mail generator: tempemail.co and you will have a Temp mail disposable address and end up on a bunch of spam lists. This email will expire after 10 minute so you can call this Temp mail 10 minute email. Our service is free! Let’s enjoy!

Young, shafted and black: is anything being done to close the influencer ethnicity pay gap?- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

Black influencers get paid less than white influencers. Not all the time, and not in every market or in every campaign. And the issue may or may not be systematic (the industry’s lack of transparency over influencer pay prevents us from finding out).
But it happens, in the same way it happens in Hollywood and in the advertising industry and in almost every other paid sphere of modern life.
It happens to Eulanda Osagiede, one half of the travel and lifestyle blogging duo behind Hey! Dip Your Toes In. Last year she told the BBC’s The Next Episode how a brand that constantly approached her about a content partnership ostensibly “never had budget” to pay her and her husband, Omo.
“I approached creator friends who had worked with the brand before,” she said. “These creators happened to be white and they all said, ‘Oh no, we got paid’. The brand continued to reach out to us. Each time they never had budget and each time I checked, they always did have budget for someone else. Maybe they just didn’t have budget for people who looked like us.”
It happens to Jacqueline Ilumoka, a blogger, model and marketer who once was paid at least £800 less than a white peer for the same deal with a fast fashion brand. It happens to Stephanie Yeboah, a plus-size influencer who, after being paid in the “low £100s” for a style content gig, found out that white influencers were paid in the “£2,000-£3,000 range” for the same job.
The intermediaries that broker influencer deals between brands and creators say pay discrepancy based on race is by no means built into the system. For many, including the influencer marketing platform Takumi, prices are predicated on each influencer’s reach. So, if an influencer of color has more followers than a white influencer in the same category, they would be paid more.
“The prices can’t be fiddled,” claims the platform’s founder, Adam Williams.
“And actually, quite often clients say they have to have diversity across the board … and actively remove some of the white influencers [from a campaign] because they want a real mix. From our platform’s perspective, it’s not a problem.”
A similar platform, Influencer, describes a similar phenomenon. The company works by asking influencers to name their fee rather than asking the client its price.
“Never have we had a situation where a client has asked us to negotiate harder or to offer a vastly reduced rate to creators based on their ethnicity,” says head of client services Nik Speller. “In some of our more recent campaigns, creators of color have actually been able to charge more than white creators with a similar following and engagement as they’ve been able to prove their ability to reach a specific audience demographic that the client is looking to advertise to.”
So if the racial influencer pay gap is not appearing at the point of deal-making, why is it happening at all? The reason is complex, structural and rooted in decades – centuries even – of historic racism. It’s because the ‘black dollar’ still has less worth than any other.

Eulanda and Omo Osagiede, founders of the blog Hey! Dip Your Toes In

Alisa Metzger has worked in the beauty industry for more than 15 years. In that time she’s witnessed a sector failing to keep up with the idea of inclusivity, growing frustrated enough to launch her own company dedicated to affordable, vegan skincare designed for all complexions.
The InnBeauty Project regularly works with a vast array of influencers; other beauty brands don’t do the same, she says, because of who they choose to include in their target market.
“Brands will look at who they’re targeting by asking who has the most money to buy their products,” she explains. “If they’re making products for Caucasian women in their 30s or 40s, they’ll go to influencers in their 20s and 30s – you always skew younger – and that’s where it all lies.
“What you see is influencers based in New York or California or Dallas – influencers that tend to be Caucasian and wear designer clothes – getting bigger paychecks because brands are clamoring for them. It comes from where you’re finding your low-hanging fruit, from who’s there to buy your brand. And in the US, in beauty, it’s still more often white women between the ages of 25 and 40. So you’re going out and finding lookalike influencers to match that demographic.”
But the reason many fashion and beauty brands still desire a white, youthful audience (whether or not they themselves realize they do) isn’t just because they have more money to spend. It’s because “dollars of color have been valued less than others” ever since demographics existed, says Coltrane Curtis, the founder and managing partner of marketing agency Team Epiphany.
This affects not just how much influencers of color get paid, but the lackluster and uninformed ways brands try to reach multicultural communities in the first place. And influencer metrics – so beloved by the modern marketer – have not been formulated with the way these communities communicate in mind, says Curtis.
“Communities of color trust people because of consistency,” he says. “When you really look at activating communities of color, it’s not just about one influencer – you need an entire community backing the message. But brands are not consistent in their marketing efforts to reach us. They use us as adrenaline boosts.
“And social is now about a metric. It’s about how many people follow you. That’s not commensurate with trust.”
This means that while a black influencer may boast a strong engagement rate with their followers, they will be overlooked in a dataset if their follower count doesn’t hit the heights of a white influencer. So their price gets driven down, which means fewer black influencers can afford to pursue such a career.
That means there are less creators available to activate the community for brands. So brands simply don’t bother trying to reach it. And the cycle continues.
“We believe that if brands want to resonate with their target audience, they must earn their place in the culture or community they want to be part of,” says Leila Fataar, founder of Platform13. “The most credible way to do that is to add value to that community and contribute to that culture. That doesn’t always have to be worthy. For us, positive impact comes in many forms.
“But it does mean respectful collaboration with the people who represent, create and shape culture from grassroots up. We call these people cultural voices. These people may or may not have a huge social following, but their authority and expertise – who follows them and how engaged their audience is – become the priority, and budget should be allocated accordingly. This truly has nothing to do with color.”
So how does it all end? The answer is simple – stop treating people of color as a way of amplifying your campaign and instead place them in the core of your creative. For Fataar and Curtis, this has meant turning the concept of ‘influencer’ on its head by brokering deals that go further than a sponsored post. Co-creation at the product level means the cultural expertise of an influencer reaches across all marketing touchpoints, while the product itself will likely appeal to the multicultural community on a more authentic level.
Co-creation, however, is an easy distraction from the bigger question brand marketers haven’t been asking often enough: who is my product really for? InnBeauty’s Metzger, a veteran of the beauty industry, has witnessed companies design products with only a white woman in mind. Now though, she says there’s no excuse for building a company in such a way.
“If you’re only looking at one demographic then it’s likely you’ll only work with a few diverse influencers … but, at the core, you’re missing the point,” she explains. “You have to start asking who your audience really is and then open out that target audience. You have to ask questions like, ‘does this work on people with different skin tones?’ That’s got to start at the chief marketer level.”
Those interrogating questions – among others such as the expanding flavor profiles of African Americans and cultural norms of second-generation Latinxs – are more likely to be asked by an agency or in-house team that is diverse. Hiring and listening to staff of color makes for an organization that can handle a broader demographic and thus value influencers of color as much as their white counterparts.
As Curtis puts it: “It’s not just about having that diversity within a corporate organization, but about encouraging inclusivity and activism. It’s systemic. It’s about how we really utilize the diversity we have to inform our decisions.
“This whole influence thing is basically word of mouth marketing. Word of mouth marketing is the only tool communities of color actually had. We didn’t have ad pages in magazines and out of home until they wanted to start selling cigarettes and alcohol to us. And so, word of mouth is the only thing that is intrinsically true to the African American experience.”

Tempemail , Tempmail Temp email addressess (10 minutes emails)– When you want to create account on some forum or social media, like Facebook, Reddit, Twitter, TikTok you have to enter information about your e-mail box to get an activation link. Unfortunately, after registration, this social media sends you dozens of messages with useless information, which you are not interested in. To avoid that, visit this Temp mail generator: tempemail.co and you will have a Temp mail disposable address and end up on a bunch of spam lists. This email will expire after 10 minute so you can call this Temp mail 10 minute email. Our service is free! Let’s enjoy!

International Women’s Day? I see Black, people- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

I identify as black first, then female. I’m not saying every woman of colour does the same. What I’m saying is, this nuance matters to me because it is how I show up in the world every day. It should matter to you as you build your teams, market your products and engage with your customers. As I think about International Women’s Day and Month and what I do for a living, this is what strikes me most profoundly.
The mistake that I think brands are making today is in believing that customer experience is powered solely by data, analytics and insights. I hear you CTOs, CIOs, and AI Evangelists, but as a creative and a storyteller, I believe CX is powered by your customers’ emotional needs, not just their product needs and digital whereabouts. Responding accordingly means knowing how they identify themselves and how they show up in the world every day.
Actor America Ferrara put it this way in her Ted Talk last year: “For seventeen years of my career I have witnessed the power our voices have when they can access presence in the culture…Presence creates possibility.”
When a brand takes a risk and allows us all to be present, good things such as Adidas Women: Reimagine Sport can happen. My girls love this video. Yes, we’ve seen Jessamyn Stanley before – and to that we say, “Girl, get your money!” Most importantly, her presence creates the possibility for more, for Adidas to have deeper conversations with us and all of its brand fans, and not just about sport but about health, wellness, even race and gender identity. Adidas has a right to be in those conversations.
In support of our female-identified clients, colleagues and peers, Iris Worldwide has invited illustrators, Kaylin Skipwith, Marylou Faure, Fanny Demarais, Laura Díez Estrada, Nicole Vanner, Carmen Ang, Jessie Lam, Lolly Morris, and Magda Bryla, to share with you some of the challenges we face and how we overcome them to bravely show up as our authentic selves.
Who is present?
Let’s pretend, gentlemen – you work an entire week and only having professional interactions with men. No women, anywhere – a Mad Men world with all Don Drapers. Sure, there are some industries and professions where this may be the status quo, but not many. Women, now it’s your turn. How many of you can complete a week of professional activities and not have a single encounter with another woman? Perhaps a bit more common for us, but still not very likely for an entire week.
Now everyone, imagine going through an entire week of work, video con-calls, F2F meetings, working lunches, work dinners, off-site visits etc., and never encountering another person of your race or ethnicity.
If you are not Asian, but have traveled to and worked in Asia, this may be a familiar feeling. For women of color almost everywhere, this is far too common, especially as we climb the ladder in our careers.
For the better part of my career in media I have been the only people of colour, let alone, woman of colour in the room, all the rooms, all the days, all the weeks.
It’s the first thing I notice when I walk into a room or join a video call.
How many of me are there? None. Again. It’s more than just a feeling of loneliness and it’s not at all about a lack of solidarity. It’s about how I will be perceived – Ignored? Tolerated? ‘Tokened?’ And I would be lying if I didn’t admit that it has a bit to do with fear and my sanity. It’s the constant – constant – and frightening feeling that you are the only one of your kind, endangered. The sanity check that I do in these moments goes like this: “I’m good at what I do but I know I’m not the only black woman or man who can do this job. Where are they and why aren’t they here?”
My challenge to all of you this month is to do a mental roll call of the women in the room when you meet. Who is present? Who is absent and why? Also, if they have shown up, alone, know this: their solitude is unwanted and unwarranted; their perspective may not be yours, but it is just as valuable, and their identity is not a choice, it’s a virtue.
Heather Keets Wright, chief creative officer, CYLNDR

Tempemail , Tempmail Temp email addressess (10 minutes emails)– When you want to create account on some forum or social media, like Facebook, Reddit, Twitter, TikTok you have to enter information about your e-mail box to get an activation link. Unfortunately, after registration, this social media sends you dozens of messages with useless information, which you are not interested in. To avoid that, visit this Temp mail generator: tempemail.co and you will have a Temp mail disposable address and end up on a bunch of spam lists. This email will expire after 10 minute so you can call this Temp mail 10 minute email. Our service is free! Let’s enjoy!

‘Help me!’: Outrage over aggressive police arrest of black man in Brooklyn, after officer refuses to say what crime he has committed- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

A video of an aggressive police arrest of a black man in New York has sparked outrage after an apparent undercover officer refused to say what crime the man had committed.
In the video, a man claiming to be an undercover police officer stopped a member of the public near a playground in the Canarsie neighbourhood of Brooklyn at approximately 7:50pm on Wednesday night.
The black man, whose name is unknown at this time, repeatedly asked what he had done wrong as he was held against a metal fence by the officer, who appeared to be threatening him with a gun.

Download the new Independent Premium app
Sharing the full story, not just the headlines
Download now

“What did I do? I did not do anything … can you answer my question? Look me in the eyes, I’m talking to you,” the man said.
“What crime did I commit? Tell me, what crime did I commit?”

leftCreated with Sketch.

rightCreated with Sketch.

1/50 4 March 2020
A migrant rests with a child in his arms next to the Tunca river in Edirne, Turkey
Reuters

2/50 3 March 2020
Spanish policemen and civil guards sporting Guy Fawkes masks protest in front of Spanish policemen standing guard during a demonstration to demand fair wages in Madrid
AFP via Getty

3/50 2 March 2020
South Korean soldiers wearing protective gear spray disinfectant as part of preventive measures against the spread of the COVID-19 coronavirus, at a market in Daegu
Yonhap/AFP via Getty

4/50 1 March 2020
A woman shouts as law enforcement officials move in to disperse a group of immigrants who had occupied a historic church and a square. They are demanding to be moved to another country as they claim to feel not safe because of xenophobic attacks in central Cape Town, South Africa
Reuters

5/50 29 February 2020
Greek border guard use teargas to push back migrants who try to enter Greece at the Pazarkule border gate in Edirne, Turkey
AP

6/50 28 February 2020
A woman makes her way and NGO’s members help as a dinghy with 54 Afghan refugees lands ashore the Greek island of Lesbos. Turkey will no longer close its border gates to refugees who want to go to Europe, a senior official told AFP, shortly after the killing of 33 Turkish soldiers in an airstrike in northern Syria
AFP via Getty Images

7/50 27 February 2020
Snow has fallen in high ground in Tasmania during the Australian summer
Tasmanian Rover Ski Club / Facebook

8/50 26 February 2020
Men ride a motorcycle past security forces patrolling a street in a riot-affected area of Delhi on Wednesday
Reuters

9/50 25 February 2020
Workers disinfect subway trains against coronavirus in Tehran, Iran
AP

10/50 24 February 2020
Turkish-backed Syrian fighters fire their anti-aircraft gun in the town of Sarmin, about 8 kilometres southeast of the city of Idlib in northwestern Syria, as they take part in a military offensive on the village of Nayrab following an artillery barrage fired by Turkish forces
AFP via Getty

11/50 23 February 2020
A security guard wearing a protective face mask stand guard as masked and costumed people walk by during the Carnival in Venice, Italy
EPA

12/50 22 February 2020
People dressed in traditional Czech folklore costumes parade through the village of Vortova near the east Bohemian city of Pardubice during the traditional Masopust carnival. The festival marks the beginning of Lent. This folk tradition of the carnival parade of masks was registered in the UNESCO List of the Intagible Cultural Heritage of Humanity in 2010
Getty

13/50 21 February 2020
An Iranian woman wearing a face mask shows her inked finger after casting her ballot at a polling station set up at the Abdol Azim shrine during the parliamentary elections in Shahr-e-Ray, Tehran Province, Iran. Iranians are heading to the polls to elect their representatives to the Islamic Consultative Assembly amid a worsening economic crisis and escalating tensions with the US
EPA

14/50 20 February 2020
Roger Stone, former advisor to US President Donald Trump arrives at court prior to his sentencing hearing. Trump’s longtime aide will be sentenced in a case that has caused a stir in Washington following meddling by the US president and his attorney general. Stone, one of the Republican leader’s allies and “oldest friends,” was convicted in November of lying to Congress, tampering with a witness and obstructing the House investigation into whether the Trump campaign coordinated with Russia to cheat in the 2016 election
AFP via Getty

15/50 19 February 2020
Members of the Kazakh Emergencies Ministry take cover during a controlled explosion triggering an avalanche for public safety in the Tien Shan mountains outside Almaty, Kazakhstan
Reuters

16/50 18 February 2020
Women chant slogans during a demonstration against gender violence outside the Tempemail Palace, in Mexico City. Dozens of women protested over the murder of a seven-year-old girl in the Mexican capital, a case that generated anger and outrage. The murder of the minor shocked the country two days after hundreds of women protested in several cities in Mexico over the femicide of Ingrid Escamilla, a 25-year-old woman who was killed by her partner north of the Mexican capital
AFP via Getty

17/50 17 February 2020
People gather at the site of a bomb blast in Quetta, Pakistan
Reuters

18/50 16 February 2020
Dogs wearing masks are seen at a main shopping area, in downtown Shanghai, China, as the country is hit by an outbreak of a new coronavirus
REUTERS

19/50 15 February 2020
Men dressed in loincloths prepare to snatch a wooden stick called “shingi” tossed by the priest during a naked festival at Saidaiji Temple in Okayama, Okayama Prefecture Japan February 15, 2020. The person who grabs the wooden stick is considered the “luckiest man of the year”.
REUTERS

20/50 14 February 2020
Squirrels eat treats at a ‘Valentine’s day party’ organised for them by staff in Skopje Zoo, North Macedonia
Reuters

21/50 13 February 2020
Internally displaced children stand on snow near tents at a makeshift camp in Azaz, Syria
Reuters

22/50 12 February 2020
A model presents a creation from the Marc Jacobs Fall/Winter 2020 collection during New York Fashion Week
Reuters

23/50 11 February 2020
Hawaiian surfer Kai Lenny rides a wave during the big waves Nazare Tow Surfing Challenge in Nazare
AFP via Getty

24/50 10 February 2020
A worker wears a protective suit as he stands outside an office building while checking people entering in Beijing, China. The number of cases of a deadly new coronavirus rose to more than 40000 in mainland China. The country has continued to lock down the city of Wuhan in an effort to contain the spread of the pneumonia-like disease which medicals experts have confirmed can be passed from human to human. The number of those who have died from the virus in China climbed to over 900, mostly in Hubei province, and cases have been reported in other countries including the United States, Canada, Australia, Japan, South Korea, India, the United Kingdom, Germany, France and several others. The World Health Organization has warned all governments to be on alert and screening has been stepped up at airports around the world. Some countries, including the United States, have put restrictions on Chinese travellers entering and advised their citizens against travel to China
Getty

25/50 9 February 2020
South Korean film director Bong Joon Ho poses with the awards, his film Parasite, won at the Oscars. It was named best picture, becoming the first non-English language film to do so
AFP via Getty

26/50 8 February 2020
Thailand security forces take cover behind an ambulance as they chase a shooter hidden in a shopping mall after a mass shooting in front of the Terminal 21, in Nakhon Ratchasima
Reuters

27/50 7 February 2020
A Palestinian demonstrator hurls stones at Israeli forces as tires burn near the Israeli barrier during a protest against the US President Donald Trump’s Middle East peace plan, in the village of Bilin, West Bank
Reuters

28/50 6 February 2020
Two people were killed and dozens injured when a train derailed outside the city of Lodi in Italy
AFP via Getty

29/50 5 February 2020
Health teams and fire brigade crews surround a passenger plane which split into three pieces after it skidded off the runway at Istanbul Sabiha Gokcen International Airport in Turkey
Anadolu Agency via Getty

30/50 4 February 2020
Sri Lanka’s military march with national flags during the 72nd independence day ceremony, in Colombo
Reuters

31/50 3 February 2020
Refugees and migrants confront riot police during a demonstration outside the Kara Tepe camp, on the island of Lesbos, Greece, February 3, 2020
Reuters

32/50 2 February 2020
An Iraqi demonstrator sits amid burning tires blocking a road during ongoing anti-government protests in Najaf, Iraq
Reuters

33/50 1 February 2020
Horses panic as a spot fire runs through the property of Lawrence and Clair Cowie near Canberra, Australia. The couple stayed to defend their home, with the spot fire destroying part of the property. Chief Minister Andrew Barr declared a State of Emergency on Friday, as the Orroral Valley bushfire continues to burn out of control
Getty

34/50 31 January 2020
Stefan Kraft soars through the air during a qualifying session for the men’s large hill individual competition at the FIS Ski Jumping World Cup event in Sapporo, Japan
EPA

35/50 30 January 2020
Commuters with protective facemasks wait to board a canal boat at Pratunam Pier in Bangkok. A Thai surgical mask factory, producing 10 million masks a month, increased working hours to cope with the rising demand following the outbreak of the coronavirus in China
AFP via Getty

36/50 29 January 2020
An Israeli soldier fires teargas towards Palestinian protestors during a demonstration in al-Aroub Palestinian refugee camp, between the West Bank towns of Hebron and Bethlehem
AFP via Getty

37/50 28 January 2020
Firefighters with their face painted with the movie character ‘Joker’, participate in a demonstration against the pension reforms and for better work conditions in Paris
EPA

38/50 27 January 2020
Flowers outside Bryant Gymnasium at Lower Merion High School, in Philadelphia, as people pay their respects after basketball legend Kobe Bryant died in a helicopter crash
Reuters

39/50 26 January 2020
US singer-songwriter Lizzo performs onstage during the 62nd Annual Grammy Awards in Los Angeles
AFP via Getty

40/50 25 January 2020
A Lebanese anti-government protester in makeshift protective gear stands under a water jet as security forces move to disperse a demonstration near government headquarters at the Grand Serail, in downtown Beirut
AFP via Getty

41/50 24 January 2020
A protester holds a sign reading “On the move” mocking the LREM party’s slogan during a demonstration in Paris, as part as a nationwide multi-sector strike against the French government’s pensions overhaul
AFP via Getty

42/50 23 January 2020
A Chinese police officer wears a protective mask as he stands guard next to an ad before the annual Spring Festival at a Beijing railway station. The number of cases of a deadly new coronavirus rose to over 500 in mainland China as health officials locked down the city of Wuhan in an effort to contain the spread of the pneumonia-like disease which medicals experts have been confirmed can be passed from human to human
Getty

43/50 22 January 2020
Visitors wear face masks as they sit inside the Venetian casino hotel resort in Macau, after the former Portuguese colony reported its first case of the new SARS-like virus that originated from Wuhan in China.
AFP via Getty

44/50 21 January 2020
Marine One helicopter with US President Donald Trump on board arrives for the 50th World Economic Forum (WEF) in Davos, Switzerland
Reuters

45/50 20 January 2020
A man walks between burning tires during ongoing anti-government protests in Najaf, Iraq
Reuters

46/50 19 January 2020
Britain’s Prime Minister Boris Johnson, Congolese President Denis Sassou Nguesso, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, French President Emmanuel Macron, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, (second row, left to right) arab League Secretary General Ahmed Abul Gheit, African Union (AU) Committee Chairman Moussa Faki, European Council President Charles Michel, German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas, US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo pose for a family picture during a Peace summit on Libya at the Chancellery in Berlin
AFP via Getty

47/50 18 January 2020
Sweden’s Jennie-Lee Burmansson competing in the final run of the Freestyle Skiing Womens Freeski Slopestyle at the Leysin Park in Leysin, during the 2020 Lausanne Winter Youth Olympic Games
AFP via Getty

48/50 17 January 2020
Firefighters take part in a demonstration to protest against the attacks against them during interventions in Strasbourg. During the New Year’s Eve night in Strasbourg, two firefighters were notably injured following a projectile thrown onto the window of their truck. Last weekend, three firefighters were victims of a stabbing by a person they came to rescue in the outskirts of the city.
AFP via Getty

49/50 16 January 2020
People enjoy the frozen lake of Houhai in Beijing ahead of the Lunar New Year of the Rat. – The Lunar New Year falls on January 25 this year and marks the Year of the Rat.
AFP via Getty

50/50 15 January 2020
Taiwanese soldiers operate a CM-11 battle tank during an exercise at a military base in Kaohsiung, southern Taiwan
AFP via Getty

1/50 4 March 2020
A migrant rests with a child in his arms next to the Tunca river in Edirne, Turkey
Reuters

2/50 3 March 2020
Spanish policemen and civil guards sporting Guy Fawkes masks protest in front of Spanish policemen standing guard during a demonstration to demand fair wages in Madrid
AFP via Getty

3/50 2 March 2020
South Korean soldiers wearing protective gear spray disinfectant as part of preventive measures against the spread of the COVID-19 coronavirus, at a market in Daegu
Yonhap/AFP via Getty

4/50 1 March 2020
A woman shouts as law enforcement officials move in to disperse a group of immigrants who had occupied a historic church and a square. They are demanding to be moved to another country as they claim to feel not safe because of xenophobic attacks in central Cape Town, South Africa
Reuters

5/50 29 February 2020
Greek border guard use teargas to push back migrants who try to enter Greece at the Pazarkule border gate in Edirne, Turkey
AP

6/50 28 February 2020
A woman makes her way and NGO’s members help as a dinghy with 54 Afghan refugees lands ashore the Greek island of Lesbos. Turkey will no longer close its border gates to refugees who want to go to Europe, a senior official told AFP, shortly after the killing of 33 Turkish soldiers in an airstrike in northern Syria
AFP via Getty Images

7/50 27 February 2020
Snow has fallen in high ground in Tasmania during the Australian summer
Tasmanian Rover Ski Club / Facebook

8/50 26 February 2020
Men ride a motorcycle past security forces patrolling a street in a riot-affected area of Delhi on Wednesday
Reuters

9/50 25 February 2020
Workers disinfect subway trains against coronavirus in Tehran, Iran
AP

10/50 24 February 2020
Turkish-backed Syrian fighters fire their anti-aircraft gun in the town of Sarmin, about 8 kilometres southeast of the city of Idlib in northwestern Syria, as they take part in a military offensive on the village of Nayrab following an artillery barrage fired by Turkish forces
AFP via Getty

11/50 23 February 2020
A security guard wearing a protective face mask stand guard as masked and costumed people walk by during the Carnival in Venice, Italy
EPA

12/50 22 February 2020
People dressed in traditional Czech folklore costumes parade through the village of Vortova near the east Bohemian city of Pardubice during the traditional Masopust carnival. The festival marks the beginning of Lent. This folk tradition of the carnival parade of masks was registered in the UNESCO List of the Intagible Cultural Heritage of Humanity in 2010
Getty

13/50 21 February 2020
An Iranian woman wearing a face mask shows her inked finger after casting her ballot at a polling station set up at the Abdol Azim shrine during the parliamentary elections in Shahr-e-Ray, Tehran Province, Iran. Iranians are heading to the polls to elect their representatives to the Islamic Consultative Assembly amid a worsening economic crisis and escalating tensions with the US
EPA

14/50 20 February 2020
Roger Stone, former advisor to US President Donald Trump arrives at court prior to his sentencing hearing. Trump’s longtime aide will be sentenced in a case that has caused a stir in Washington following meddling by the US president and his attorney general. Stone, one of the Republican leader’s allies and “oldest friends,” was convicted in November of lying to Congress, tampering with a witness and obstructing the House investigation into whether the Trump campaign coordinated with Russia to cheat in the 2016 election
AFP via Getty

15/50 19 February 2020
Members of the Kazakh Emergencies Ministry take cover during a controlled explosion triggering an avalanche for public safety in the Tien Shan mountains outside Almaty, Kazakhstan
Reuters

16/50 18 February 2020
Women chant slogans during a demonstration against gender violence outside the Tempemail Palace, in Mexico City. Dozens of women protested over the murder of a seven-year-old girl in the Mexican capital, a case that generated anger and outrage. The murder of the minor shocked the country two days after hundreds of women protested in several cities in Mexico over the femicide of Ingrid Escamilla, a 25-year-old woman who was killed by her partner north of the Mexican capital
AFP via Getty

17/50 17 February 2020
People gather at the site of a bomb blast in Quetta, Pakistan
Reuters

18/50 16 February 2020
Dogs wearing masks are seen at a main shopping area, in downtown Shanghai, China, as the country is hit by an outbreak of a new coronavirus
REUTERS

19/50 15 February 2020
Men dressed in loincloths prepare to snatch a wooden stick called “shingi” tossed by the priest during a naked festival at Saidaiji Temple in Okayama, Okayama Prefecture Japan February 15, 2020. The person who grabs the wooden stick is considered the “luckiest man of the year”.
REUTERS

20/50 14 February 2020
Squirrels eat treats at a ‘Valentine’s day party’ organised for them by staff in Skopje Zoo, North Macedonia
Reuters

21/50 13 February 2020
Internally displaced children stand on snow near tents at a makeshift camp in Azaz, Syria
Reuters

22/50 12 February 2020
A model presents a creation from the Marc Jacobs Fall/Winter 2020 collection during New York Fashion Week
Reuters

23/50 11 February 2020
Hawaiian surfer Kai Lenny rides a wave during the big waves Nazare Tow Surfing Challenge in Nazare
AFP via Getty

24/50 10 February 2020
A worker wears a protective suit as he stands outside an office building while checking people entering in Beijing, China. The number of cases of a deadly new coronavirus rose to more than 40000 in mainland China. The country has continued to lock down the city of Wuhan in an effort to contain the spread of the pneumonia-like disease which medicals experts have confirmed can be passed from human to human. The number of those who have died from the virus in China climbed to over 900, mostly in Hubei province, and cases have been reported in other countries including the United States, Canada, Australia, Japan, South Korea, India, the United Kingdom, Germany, France and several others. The World Health Organization has warned all governments to be on alert and screening has been stepped up at airports around the world. Some countries, including the United States, have put restrictions on Chinese travellers entering and advised their citizens against travel to China
Getty

25/50 9 February 2020
South Korean film director Bong Joon Ho poses with the awards, his film Parasite, won at the Oscars. It was named best picture, becoming the first non-English language film to do so
AFP via Getty

26/50 8 February 2020
Thailand security forces take cover behind an ambulance as they chase a shooter hidden in a shopping mall after a mass shooting in front of the Terminal 21, in Nakhon Ratchasima
Reuters

27/50 7 February 2020
A Palestinian demonstrator hurls stones at Israeli forces as tires burn near the Israeli barrier during a protest against the US President Donald Trump’s Middle East peace plan, in the village of Bilin, West Bank
Reuters

28/50 6 February 2020
Two people were killed and dozens injured when a train derailed outside the city of Lodi in Italy
AFP via Getty

29/50 5 February 2020
Health teams and fire brigade crews surround a passenger plane which split into three pieces after it skidded off the runway at Istanbul Sabiha Gokcen International Airport in Turkey
Anadolu Agency via Getty

30/50 4 February 2020
Sri Lanka’s military march with national flags during the 72nd independence day ceremony, in Colombo
Reuters

31/50 3 February 2020
Refugees and migrants confront riot police during a demonstration outside the Kara Tepe camp, on the island of Lesbos, Greece, February 3, 2020
Reuters

32/50 2 February 2020
An Iraqi demonstrator sits amid burning tires blocking a road during ongoing anti-government protests in Najaf, Iraq
Reuters

33/50 1 February 2020
Horses panic as a spot fire runs through the property of Lawrence and Clair Cowie near Canberra, Australia. The couple stayed to defend their home, with the spot fire destroying part of the property. Chief Minister Andrew Barr declared a State of Emergency on Friday, as the Orroral Valley bushfire continues to burn out of control
Getty

34/50 31 January 2020
Stefan Kraft soars through the air during a qualifying session for the men’s large hill individual competition at the FIS Ski Jumping World Cup event in Sapporo, Japan
EPA

35/50 30 January 2020
Commuters with protective facemasks wait to board a canal boat at Pratunam Pier in Bangkok. A Thai surgical mask factory, producing 10 million masks a month, increased working hours to cope with the rising demand following the outbreak of the coronavirus in China
AFP via Getty

36/50 29 January 2020
An Israeli soldier fires teargas towards Palestinian protestors during a demonstration in al-Aroub Palestinian refugee camp, between the West Bank towns of Hebron and Bethlehem
AFP via Getty

37/50 28 January 2020
Firefighters with their face painted with the movie character ‘Joker’, participate in a demonstration against the pension reforms and for better work conditions in Paris
EPA

38/50 27 January 2020
Flowers outside Bryant Gymnasium at Lower Merion High School, in Philadelphia, as people pay their respects after basketball legend Kobe Bryant died in a helicopter crash
Reuters

39/50 26 January 2020
US singer-songwriter Lizzo performs onstage during the 62nd Annual Grammy Awards in Los Angeles
AFP via Getty

40/50 25 January 2020
A Lebanese anti-government protester in makeshift protective gear stands under a water jet as security forces move to disperse a demonstration near government headquarters at the Grand Serail, in downtown Beirut
AFP via Getty

41/50 24 January 2020
A protester holds a sign reading “On the move” mocking the LREM party’s slogan during a demonstration in Paris, as part as a nationwide multi-sector strike against the French government’s pensions overhaul
AFP via Getty

42/50 23 January 2020
A Chinese police officer wears a protective mask as he stands guard next to an ad before the annual Spring Festival at a Beijing railway station. The number of cases of a deadly new coronavirus rose to over 500 in mainland China as health officials locked down the city of Wuhan in an effort to contain the spread of the pneumonia-like disease which medicals experts have been confirmed can be passed from human to human
Getty

43/50 22 January 2020
Visitors wear face masks as they sit inside the Venetian casino hotel resort in Macau, after the former Portuguese colony reported its first case of the new SARS-like virus that originated from Wuhan in China.
AFP via Getty

44/50 21 January 2020
Marine One helicopter with US President Donald Trump on board arrives for the 50th World Economic Forum (WEF) in Davos, Switzerland
Reuters

45/50 20 January 2020
A man walks between burning tires during ongoing anti-government protests in Najaf, Iraq
Reuters

46/50 19 January 2020
Britain’s Prime Minister Boris Johnson, Congolese President Denis Sassou Nguesso, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, French President Emmanuel Macron, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, (second row, left to right) arab League Secretary General Ahmed Abul Gheit, African Union (AU) Committee Chairman Moussa Faki, European Council President Charles Michel, German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas, US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo pose for a family picture during a Peace summit on Libya at the Chancellery in Berlin
AFP via Getty

47/50 18 January 2020
Sweden’s Jennie-Lee Burmansson competing in the final run of the Freestyle Skiing Womens Freeski Slopestyle at the Leysin Park in Leysin, during the 2020 Lausanne Winter Youth Olympic Games
AFP via Getty

48/50 17 January 2020
Firefighters take part in a demonstration to protest against the attacks against them during interventions in Strasbourg. During the New Year’s Eve night in Strasbourg, two firefighters were notably injured following a projectile thrown onto the window of their truck. Last weekend, three firefighters were victims of a stabbing by a person they came to rescue in the outskirts of the city.
AFP via Getty

49/50 16 January 2020
People enjoy the frozen lake of Houhai in Beijing ahead of the Lunar New Year of the Rat. – The Lunar New Year falls on January 25 this year and marks the Year of the Rat.
AFP via Getty

50/50 15 January 2020
Taiwanese soldiers operate a CM-11 battle tank during an exercise at a military base in Kaohsiung, southern Taiwan
AFP via Getty

About 90 seconds into the video, multiple officers in New York Police Department​ (NYPD) uniform ran towards the man and wrestled him to the ground.
The man, who said he was unarmed, could be heard repeatedly screaming “help me” as he was tackled and forced down by multiple officers.
“At first I thought it was two random guys and one guy was man handling the other so I was about to cross the street and then I saw the cop’s gun,” said the woman who filmed the video, which has been viewed more than 1.5 million times on social media.

Read more

“It was all unnecessary. And the fact that the cop would not identify himself in his street clothes when using police force and would not answer him when he asked what crime he committed is a complete abuse of power.”
The woman, who identified herself by her social media name “Velvet”, told The Independent that the last thing she saw of the man was when he was put into a police vehicle and driven away.
It is unclear at this time what, if anything, the man was arrested for and whether he has been charged with any crime.

Only the best news in your inbox

The NYPD has been approached for comment on the video.
Rebecca Kavanagh, a criminal defence attorney and legal media analyst, said there was “no possible justification” for the aggressive arrest.
“Regardless of the reason for the stop (because I am sure NYPD will come up with a reason like a report of a gun) there is no possible justification for this horrific use of violence,” Ms Kavanagh said.
She added: “He [the black man] is fully cooperative. He doesn’t do anything that would have needed more than one cop to calmly arrest him.”

Tempemail , Tempmail Temp email addressess (10 minutes emails)– When you want to create account on some forum or social media, like Facebook, Reddit, Twitter, TikTok you have to enter information about your e-mail box to get an activation link. Unfortunately, after registration, this social media sends you dozens of messages with useless information, which you are not interested in. To avoid that, visit this Temp mail generator: tempemail.co and you will have a Temp mail disposable address and end up on a bunch of spam lists. This email will expire after 10 minute so you can call this Temp mail 10 minute email. Our service is free! Let’s enjoy!

Latest AMD Radeon drivers are meant to address black screen issues – Blog – 10 minute

In our recent opinion piece ‘Gamers are ditching Radeon graphics cards over driver issues’ we discussed how a portion of Navi-based Radeon owners have been suffering from black screen and other instability issues. We haven’t gone through this, but many gamers have. This is a real shame considering GPUs like the Radeon RX 5700 series tend to provide killer value.
The latest Radeon Adrenaline 20.2.2 drivers are all about addressing these with extensive patch notes that will hopefully minimize the problems for Radeon RX 5500, 5600 and 5700 series owners. Highlights in the fixed bugs section include:

Performing a task switch with some Radeon Software features enabled or some third-party applications with hardware acceleration running in the background may cause a system hang or black screen.
Improvements have been made that allow for more responsive fan ramp up or fan ramp down times on Radeon RX 5700 series graphics products.
When Instant Replay is enabled, a TDR or black screen may occur when launching games or applications.
A black screen may occur when toggling HDR on in the game settings of Battlefield V.
The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt may experience an application hang or black screen during certain parts of the game or intermittently during gameplay.
Some video content in Chrome may appear as a black screen or be unresponsive on Radeon RX 5000 series graphics products when hardware acceleration is enabled.

Those have been sorted out on the new 20.2.2 drivers though AMD acknowledges in the release notes that “some users may still experience black screen or system hang issues during extended periods of gameplay,” and they’re actively working to detect and fix those.
Typically we like to give both AMD and Nvidia a few months to iron out bugs when releasing a new GPU series, especially when they’re based on a new architecture, as was the case with Turing and Navi. Nvidia went through a fair share of teething issues with Turing, but they went on top of most major issues quickly. AMD, on the other hand, has had several months to sort out Navi and this is coming way too late, which will no doubt bite them back.
As discussed recently, we haven’t run into any major issues after countless hours of testing new Radeon GPUs in our labs, but one useful piece of advice that has saved us from having to troubleshoot software glitches is to use the Display Driver Uninstaller tool (DDU) to remove previous driver installations before installing updated drivers.

Related Reads

10 minutes mail – Also known by names like : 10minemail, 10minutemail, 10mins email, mail 10 minutes, 10 minute e-mail, 10min mail, 10minute email or 10 minute temporary email. 10 minute email address is a disposable temporary email that self-destructed after a 10 minutes.Tempemail.co – is most advanced throwaway email service that helps you avoid spam and stay safe. Try tempemail and you can view content, post comments or download something anonymously on Internet.

Tempemail , Tempmail Temp email addressess (10 minutes emails)– When you want to create account on some forum or social media, like Facebook, Reddit, Twitter, TikTok you have to enter information about your e-mail box to get an activation link. Unfortunately, after registration, this social media sends you dozens of messages with useless information, which you are not interested in. To avoid that, visit this Temp mail generator: tempemail.co and you will have a Temp mail disposable address and end up on a bunch of spam lists. This email will expire after 10 minute so you can call this Temp mail 10 minute email. Our service is free! Let’s enjoy!

‘This line is for employees only’: stories of being Black in advertising, 1969-2020- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

1970s

Carol H Williams (pictured in main image) founded her eponymous advertising agency in 1986. Previously she was the first woman and first African American creative director and vice-president of Leo Burnett, which she joined in 1969.
It was my third day at the Leo Burnett advertising agency. I was on the 12th floor, sitting in the cubicles occupied by the African American copywriters, who were sponsored by the 4A’s advertising class.
We called it Chocolate City.
On the other side of my cubicle, a fellow copywriter came storming in. She threw some paper on her desk.
“What’s wrong?” I asked.
“My team is having a meeting without me,” she revealed.
“Why didn’t you go in?”
“Because I wasn’t invited.”
Almost everyone on the 13th floor – ‘upstairs’, as we called it – was white and male. It was easy to feel uninvited. My own phone hadn’t rung once for a meeting. So, I decided to take a stroll ‘upstairs’.
I walked down the hallways of the 13th floor, passing by the big-wig creatives who boasted their experience with cardboard cutouts of Morris the Cat and Jolly Green Giant hanging by their doors. Jim Gilmore, my supervisor, had his door wide open. His office was filled with white men hovering over a single guy at a desk with his typewriter.
I started to shy away, but they’d already seen me. The man at the typewriter interviewed me for my very job, so I spoke to him.
“I’m Carol Williams.”
“Jim Gilmore. Come on in.”
I leaned against a file cabinet and listened to them lament about their assignment to launch a line of biscuits, Pillsbury Best, to compete with toast. But none of these men had ever heard of breakfast biscuits. They even found it absurd.
I was shocked. Maybe it was my southern Black roots, but my family ate biscuits for breakfast. The images of Sunday breakfast before church with straight-up eggs, grits, gravy or jelly, and mom’s delicious homemade biscuits, propelled me back to my cubicle with a pen.
‘Nothing is quite as good as biscuits in the morning, it’s Pillsbury’s Best time of day.’
I walked that line upstairs to Jim Gilmore the next day. He was still staring at his blank typewriter, only now he was alone. I handed him the paper.
It took him a moment to really read it, but when he did, he stopped everything he was doing and peered at me.
“You wrote this?”
I nodded.
“That’s a damn good line.”
The next morning was typical Chocolate City: the reading, the waiting, a small radio playing music in the background. Suddenly the radio cut off and a hush spread around the cubicles. I barely got ahold of what was happening when I turned around to Jim Gilmore standing in my cubicle.
“They bought your line,” he said. “Come upstairs tomorrow morning. I have another assignment for you.”
There was only a moment to revel in that remark: that the best and brightest of advertising had bought my line to head a campaign, all based on a poor Black family’s Sunday breakfast.
Soon after I was back upstairs, writing from my heart and my experiences.
Initially, I may not have had a place at the table, but I took a seat anyway and I’ve had one ever since. At times, it’s been at the head.
1980s

Valerie Graves is the former chief creative officer of Leo Burnett’s Vigilante, the UniWorld Group and Motown Records. Currently a creative consultant and author of Pressure Makes Diamonds, she began her career at D’Arcy in 1974.
I’ll always remember the 1980s as the decade my situation in advertising took the giant leap from ‘Black professional’ to ‘professional Black’.
In 1980, I cruised home to the Motor City with my career solidly in second gear. Having spent three years in Boston acquiring experience in banking, packaged goods and chain restaurants to complement my Detroit car chops, I easily landed a job at Ross Roy, an old-school Detroit agency looking to burnish its stuffy image with hip moves like hiring a Black copywriter.
Ross Roy was the fourth agency I joined as the shop’s only Black creative professional. However, Ross Roy’s Black vice-president, two administrative assistants and data processor set it apart from my two previous agencies, K&E and BBDO; there, I had been the only Black, period.
At Boston-based K&E, in fact, I had enjoyed the dubious honor of being the sole Black professional in the entire city.
In the 1980s, the biggest challenge for a Black ad professional was avoiding being co-opted or consigned to ‘mascot’ status. Once I became a ‘go-to guy’ at Ross Roy, the creative director – ignoring my preference not to be nicknamed – dubbed me ‘Val Graves’.
Sometimes, hearing him tell someone, “You need to meet Val Graves, she’s dynamic!” I would think, she sounds great, I’d like to meet her myself. Still, in the 1980s, in was in, and kind of like [Roots’] Kunta Kinte, who became Toby, I made peace with being renamed by a white man, put my head down and did the work.
Doing the work paid off. Big time. The 1980s were still an era when agencies with car accounts gave free cars to valued employees, and when I made vice-president after three years of doing memorable work on difficult accounts, I got my wheels, company stock and five-figure line of credit, just like a white guy.
But unlike the white guy, vice-president was not my steppingstone to the upper echelons of senior management, and I knew it. As a 34-year-old Black professional, I was already a success and a role model, and the ad industry of the 1980s expected me to be satisfied.
Black professional, meet glass ceiling.
It’s been said that first people want success, then they want success on their own terms. Even before I knew I wanted it, trailblazing entrepreneur Byron Lewis offered me just that.
His proffer of a job at the African American-targeted agency UniWorld was pitch perfection: “Join me, and there is no limit to how high you can rise. Come work with everyone who is anyone in Black America. Come where your intelligence is assumed, and your talent is celebrated.”
Like most Black professionals in general market positions in the 1980s, I felt great trepidation – justifiably so, it turned out – that I might never be offered another general market job. But UniWorld’s blue-chip client list (AT&T, Burger King, Colgate, Ford, 7Up and more) convinced me to abandon my fears and plunge into an advertising reality that was both familiar and totally unknown.
From my first day at UniWorld I knew I was home. Byron summoned me to a conference room to meet tennis legend Arthur Ashe, who was soliciting our help to bring his sport to inner-city kids. My first project, a General Foods-sponsored campaign to support Black colleges, allowed me to highlight the story of Mary McLeod Bethune, the educator who funded a college by selling sweet potato pies, and after whom my elementary school had been named.
I felt the full depth of my well of cultural knowledge, and sensed that drawing from it could make me an expert in an industry that, in the 1980s, was only beginning to awaken to the power of multiculturalism. On that day, in 1985, I joyfully made the transition from Black professional to professional Black and never looked back.
When I entered advertising, I found my profession. In multicultural advertising, I discovered my calling.
1990s

Derek Walker is the founder of Brown and Browner Advertising, based in Columbia, South Carolina. He started out his career in the mid-1990s, first as a copywriter at Cramer-Krasselt.
Cramer-Krasselt in Milwaukee was on a roll when I arrived fresh out of the Portfolio Center.
As a matter of fact, advertising was still on a roll. Markets like San Francisco, Portland, Minneapolis, Seattle and little old Milwaukee were holding their own creatively against the bigger advertising markets.
Agency life was different. The offices (and many of us had offices) were alive with music and conversations. It was nothing to see teams sitting in an office together working and playing for hours. The idea of teams was at the core of our business.
Still, being a Black creative was ‘interesting’.
During my time in Milwaukee, I was the only Black creative in the city. There’s a lot of pressure that comes along with being ‘the only’.
Having leadership that was not only aware of this but sensitive to it helped a lot. It also helped that the industry hadn’t abandoned training yet. I was fortunate to have mentors to help me grow professionally.
But they still didn’t understand what it was like to be ‘the only’.
“I thought the picnic was for employees only?” the account executive said to me as I stood in the food line of our agency picnic.
“It is,” I replied. I wasn’t going to explain my presence to her.
“Well, aren’t you [the receptionist’s] son?” she continued.
“No, I’m a copywriter,” I came back. By now, other employees were noticing.
“What? We don’t have any Black copywriters. You’re joking,” she said.
Without blinking, I turned and yelled across the lot to my creative director: “Hey Neil, what’s my title?”
“Copywriter,” Neil said, without skipping a beat.
The shock on her face.
“Well, I guess we do now have a Black copywriter. Hi, I’m Derek – the Black copywriter,” I said extending my hand.
She and I became fast friends. But it was interesting that the people I was in line with never thought to correct her.
The 90s ruined me for today’s production practices and values. Radio and TV production was a different world. We would spend a day recording three radio spots. They were funny and daring. My very first had music written by the Oscar-winning Peter Buffet. If only I had known then what I know now.
The 90s was the end of an era for advertising.
Our focus shifted from the power of creativity to the power of tech and data, and with that we lost a bit of our humanity. Client/agency relationships that had lasted decades started to end. We entered a period of chasing a magic bullet to justify our existence. The work was no longer enough.
On the diversity front, we lost a lot of ground. Many of the Black people who I knew in other markets at other agencies started to be pushed out or ‘encouraged’ to leave the industry. There weren’t that many of us, so the loss stood out even more.
Many became eternal freelancers or moved to the client side. The few C-suite Black advertising professionals – those gave me hope that I had a place in advertising – were gone.
We started the 1990s knowing who we were. We ended it questioning who we had become.
2000s

Shameka M Brown is co-founder and executive coach at The Only One There. She began her advertising career at Foote, Cone & Belding (FCB) in 1999.
I was raised to believe that hard work was all it took to succeed. But 20 years later, I realized that wasn’t the case.
In 1999, I graduated in the second class of the new ad school phenom, the VCU Brandcenter. It took me six months to finally land at FCB.
Honestly, I was less than thrilled because I had set my sights on a smaller shop, like Hampel/Stefanides. But I was starting to feel the pressure from my southern parents to “stop being so picky and take any job with benefits” and, anyway, the headhunter thought it was a good fit. So I took it.
Upon starting, the vibe was weird. I entered after a huge bloodletting. Lots of senior execs had been let go. And I was part of the “new blood” brought in to bring new thinking.
After the layoffs, some of the remaining groups were seemingly formed at random, placing two people together with nothing more in common than needing to keep their jobs. I was placed into one of those. What also remained was a largely homogenous boys’ club made up of mid-senior level men.
By the end of my first month, I realized that I was one of two Black people in a creative department of more than 180. Larry Harris was the other one. I literally became his shadow until he was promoted within a few months of my arrival to run a new department called ‘digital’.
And so, I became the only one there. Aside from the general optics, I didn’t feel ‘othered’. It was hard work, but seemingly fair. Within months, I had identified another group that was doing work I admired. So, my partner and I did double duty until we could officially switch into theirs.
To say we seized the opportunity would be an understatement: we killed it.
We gave our all to every assignment and we reaped the rewards for it. In 2000, we were named creative team of the year and several raises soon followed. While I didn’t feel the effects of my race, I realized that limitations were being placed on me because of my gender and age. We were a team of two women in our mid-20s and everyone ahead of us was not. And yet, we were on a roll.
Then, 9/11 happened. The world stopped. The grind slowed down. And people realized there was more to life than advertising. In the two years that followed, it felt like the playing field had leveled. The best work made it to the meeting, and oftentimes, it was ours.
By 2003, I was promoted to vice-president, senior copywriter. But as I approached the associate creative directive level, business as usual returned. After a rocket-like trajectory, my creative director sat me down and told me I didn’t have “it.” It took a while for me to comprehend this because I had just had “it” a year before.
I racked my brain on what it could be: my race, my gender, my age or my talent? And then, it dawned on me that it was simply because I was next in line. It had more to do with politics than my ability to do the job.
Around that time, my doctor strong advised me to consider starting our family. He suspected endometriosis and waiting another year could have meant not having kids at all. So, with the promotion out of reach, I turned my attention to starting my family.
After giving birth, I took an extended maternity leave to help deprogram my ‘work above all else’ mentality ­– because I really had always chosen work over everything else. I also wanted to stay out long enough to be replaced on my accounts and be assigned to new clients.
But as I prepped for my return, it was clear that I had changed and the business had not. So, I decided to move on and freelance.
Recently, a former colleague brought it to my attention that some in the department questioned whether or not my success had been because I was Black. As if it had been some kind of affirmative action play. Although I had worked my ass off and had earned it all, someone still tried to minimize my success to me being the Black girl.
20 years later, that comment still stung. I can only imagine what it would’ve felt like to hear it back then.
2010s

Gabrielle Shirdan is vice-president, creative director at McCann New York. She landed her first job at Philadelphia’s LevLane in the early 2010s.
I knew early in my life what I wanted to make out of it.
That’s an honor I don’t take for granted: I was just nine years old when I wrote that I wanted to be in advertising. Perhaps it was Halle Berry in Boomerang or that ‘Freestyle’​ Nike ad, but I really just wanted to be an artist and​ ​a leader like my mother.
Somewhere between studying creative writing at Penn and Professor Huerhnergarth’s Intro to Advertising class, I knew this industry was where I ​belonged​. I was a bright-eyed freshman squeezing my foot in the door at one of Philadelphia’s greatest agencies when they said sorry, internships were only for seniors.
But gushing with ambition, a little​ “please, give me a chance” ​and with my mother’s lessons in tow, I made the case. They let me in. Two semesters and a campaign later, I went from being an intern to being offered a full-time position my sophomore year.
I’d rush to work from class and see my designs on the subway. I gave my first client pitch as a junior. And though I said “um” far too many times, I was sure that I had fallen in love with this ad life – with losing sleep and inviting myself to meetings. Briefs on briefs. All-nighters? Let’s go. Advertising was absolutely it for me.
Watching my single mother build a business from our dining room table taught me to see the ‘cool’ in challenges. That’s why I love it. But somewhere between eager intern and vice-president, creative director, I have realized the greatest challenges I’m facing aren’t on the brief, but rather in the boardroom.
They are in the moments my concepts challenge a coworker’s comfort zone: in the moments I have to defend why it’s not my defensiveness but my passion; in the moments I find myself proving myself again and again and wait…really, again?
The challenges are in the moments I pitch a ‘diverse’ idea when there’s no ‘diversity’ brief. In the moments I have to send ‘the list’ of Black creatives or Black directors because they just can’t seem to find us.
My presence presents a new narrative. I’ve had the privilege to work across the gamut of global brands from Cadillac to Coca-Cola to General Mills to Microsoft, but the one brief I have yet to crack is the call to action for our industry to get out of the way for culture, and to understand that ​they​ won’t always understand.
The further I go in my career, the more I realize there is a threshold to the agency appetite for inclusion.
Our industry claims it wants ‘disruption’ in the work, but has real resistance against disruption of the status quo. True disruption comes from diversity of thought and experience first, ideas second. True inclusion means a transfer of power, and that is a hard pill to swallow for the guardians of the gate.​
​Sure, having a seat at the table is great. But I’m asking to break off some bread and pass the power so that I know it’s real.
I promise it’s in good hands.

Tempemail , Tempmail Temp email addressess (10 minutes emails)– When you want to create account on some forum or social media, like Facebook, Reddit, Twitter, TikTok you have to enter information about your e-mail box to get an activation link. Unfortunately, after registration, this social media sends you dozens of messages with useless information, which you are not interested in. To avoid that, visit this Temp mail generator: tempemail.co and you will have a Temp mail disposable address and end up on a bunch of spam lists. This email will expire after 10 minute so you can call this Temp mail 10 minute email. Our service is free! Let’s enjoy!