WeTransfer not banned yet, working fine in India- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

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Despite reports claiming that the Indian government has banned popular file sharing platform WeTransfer in the country, the app which helps sends heavy files up to 2GB for free was working fine on Monday.
Reports earlier said that the Department of Telecommunications (DoT) in a May 18 order had directed the Internet Service Providers (ISPs) in the country to partially ban WeTransfer.
However, files were being sent seamlessly on Monday via WeTransfer.
“We have received reports that WeTransfer is being (partially) blocked in India. Our team is currently investigating the issue, we hope to have more details soon. In the meantime, the best workaround is to use a VPN service to access our site,” the company tweeted.
Launched in 2009, WeTransfer’s premium service allows users to share up to 20GB data or folders and also offers 1TB of storage space.
The independent service competes against Dropbox, Google Drive and Microsoft OneDrive, among others.
The service is very popular among the Indians to send heavy files, videos and other content which is otherwise difficult to share.
Some reports even claimed that the DoT “cited national interest and public interest being the reasons to ban Wetransfer”.
The DoT has not commented on such claims yet.

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The five: ads banned for greenwashing | Technology – Blog – 10 minute

Ryanair
The airline came under fire last week from the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) for using outdated information to claim it was the UK’s lowest emission airline. The statistics it used failed to include many rival airlines and were based on data from 2011. The ASA ruled that there was not enough evidence to support the claim and banned the advert as misleading.
BMW
The car giant had a Facebook advert banned in 2017 for its i3 electric car. The company claimed that the car was “zero emissions”, but this was disputed on the grounds that it came with the option of a small petrol engine to maintain its charge and also that it seemed to claim that by buying the car, customers would be “giving back” to the environment. The ASA ruled that this was misleading and the advert in its original form was pulled.
Fischer Future Heat
The company, which sells electric immersion heaters, argued in a 2019 advert that its product was superior to traditional water cylinders, with one of the claims being that it was “zero emissions”. The ASA ruled this misleading as, although the boiler did not directly release CO2 into the atmosphere, it was powered by electricity, which is a source of carbon emissions, so although it was more environmentally friendly, it couldn’t call itself “zero emissions”.
Ancol Pet Products
This company marketed its biodegradable dog waste bags in 2018. It claimed they lessened dogs’ impact on the environment, but further research showed that when buried in traditional landfill, as they were likely to be once discarded in park bins, they were no more beneficial than standard bags. The ASA ruled that this was misleading and banned the ad.
Shell
In a 2008 advert, the oil giant Shell described a Canadian tar sands project, involving the strip-mining of 140,000 sq km of Alberta, and the construction of the world’s largest oil refinery in Texas as “sustainable”. “Because we had not seen data that showed how Shell was effectively managing carbon emissions from its oil sands projects in order to limit climate change, we concluded that the ad was misleading,” said the ASA.

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Despite being banned, Big Tobacco is still on social media- Tempemail – Blog – 10 minute

Big Tobacco likes to stay ahead of the curve – to survive, it has to. Its fundamental problem is that one in two of its long-term users die from tobacco-related diseases. To hook a new generation into addiction, it has to try every advertising and marketing trick in its playbook.
And it has to be innovative. As one ex-marketing consultant remarked: “The problem, is how do you sell death?” He said the industry did it with great open spaces, such as mountains and lakes. They did it with healthy young people and iconic images. So the Marlboro Man became a symbol of masculinity and, for women, the industry promoted smoking as a “torch of freedom”.

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For years, the industry fought regulators who slowly and belatedly restricted where and how it could advertise. Then came the internet, which was a dream come true for a tobacco marketeer. The industry could run riot in an unregulated haven. One commentator noted in Wired magazine in 2017 that the internet was a contemporary incarnation of the wild west.

The old rules no longer applied, and Big Tobacco began using internet platforms, including Facebook and Instagram, to bypass advertising bans. They began paying social media influencers to promote traditional tobacco products as well as e-cigarettes. And they were very successful at it.
In August 2018, the New York Times investigated Big Tobacco’s social media influence. The paper found 123 hashtags associated with companies’ tobacco products, which had been viewed a staggering 25 billion times. Robert Kozinets, a professor at the University of Southern California, told the newspaper that what the industry was doing was a “really effective way” to get around existing laws to restrict advertising to young people.

Big Tobacco is reaching Instagrammers and Facebook users (iStock)

Cease and desist
The pressure on the industry to act increased in May 2019 when 125 public health organisations called on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and Snapchat to immediately end the promotion of cigarettes and e-cigarettes. This included banning the use of social media influencers. The social media companies ignored the request.
In December 2019, in a landmark decision, the UK Advertising Standards Authority ruled against British American Tobacco and three other firms for promoting their products on Instagram, after a complaint by Action on Smoking and Health, Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids and Stopping Tobacco Organisations and Products, of which the University of Bath’s Tobacco Control Research Group is a partner.
In a follow-up statement, Facebook and Instagram announced what many saw as a long-overdue update to their policy on tobacco. It said that branded content that promotes goods such as vaping, tobacco products and weapons “will not be allowed”. The statement made the bold claim that their advertising policies had long “prohibited” the advertisement of these products. The platforms promised that enforcement would begin in the coming weeks.

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A 1929 advert for Chesterfield cigarettes that featured in Cosmopolitan magazine

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A 1900 advert for Ogden’s Guinea – Gold Cigarettes that featured in the Illustrated London News
Getty

3/18
A 1918 advert for Strand cigarettes that featured in Bruno’s Bohemia
Anton Raath

4/18
A 1939 newspaper advert for Piccadilly cigarettes
Wellcome Library

5/18
A 1941 advert for Camel cigarettes featuring baseball player Joe DiMaggio

6/18
A 1929 advert for Chesterfield cigarettes that featured in Cosmopolitan magazine in the US

7/18
A 1952 advert for Craven ‘A’ cigarettes featuring England footballer Stanley Matthews
Science Museum

8/18
A 1950 advert for Chesterfield cigarettes featuring baseball player Bub McMillan

9/18
A 1930 advert for Old Gold cigarettes that featured in Motion Picture magazine in the US

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A 1931 advert for Lucky Strike cigarettes that featured in the Literary Digest
Rex

11/18
A 1952 advert for Player’s Navy Cut cigarettes that featured in the Picture Post
Getty

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A 1952 advert for cigarettes with the Du Maurier filter that featured in the Picture Post
Getty

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A 1974 Health Education Council poster warning against the danger of smoking whilst pregnant
Getty

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One of four posters from a 1998 campaign warning teenagers that smoking causes damage to the heart and lungs from the first cigarette
PA

15/18
One of four posters from a 1998 campaign warning teenagers that smoking causes damage to the heart and lungs from the first cigarette
PA

16/18
One of four posters from a 1998 campaign warning teenagers that smoking causes damage to the heart and lungs from the first cigarette
PA

17/18
A poster from a 1999 campaign from the Health Education Authority urging women not to smoke whilst pregnant
PA

18/18
Steve Plumb, 40, from Peterborough, stands next to a 2003 poster issued by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) warning of the dangers that smoking cigarettes can have on the heart
PA

1/18
A 1929 advert for Chesterfield cigarettes that featured in Cosmopolitan magazine

2/18
A 1900 advert for Ogden’s Guinea – Gold Cigarettes that featured in the Illustrated London News
Getty

3/18
A 1918 advert for Strand cigarettes that featured in Bruno’s Bohemia
Anton Raath

4/18
A 1939 newspaper advert for Piccadilly cigarettes
Wellcome Library

5/18
A 1941 advert for Camel cigarettes featuring baseball player Joe DiMaggio

6/18
A 1929 advert for Chesterfield cigarettes that featured in Cosmopolitan magazine in the US

7/18
A 1952 advert for Craven ‘A’ cigarettes featuring England footballer Stanley Matthews
Science Museum

8/18
A 1950 advert for Chesterfield cigarettes featuring baseball player Bub McMillan

9/18
A 1930 advert for Old Gold cigarettes that featured in Motion Picture magazine in the US

10/18
A 1931 advert for Lucky Strike cigarettes that featured in the Literary Digest
Rex

11/18
A 1952 advert for Player’s Navy Cut cigarettes that featured in the Picture Post
Getty

12/18
A 1952 advert for cigarettes with the Du Maurier filter that featured in the Picture Post
Getty

13/18
A 1974 Health Education Council poster warning against the danger of smoking whilst pregnant
Getty

14/18
One of four posters from a 1998 campaign warning teenagers that smoking causes damage to the heart and lungs from the first cigarette
PA

15/18
One of four posters from a 1998 campaign warning teenagers that smoking causes damage to the heart and lungs from the first cigarette
PA

16/18
One of four posters from a 1998 campaign warning teenagers that smoking causes damage to the heart and lungs from the first cigarette
PA

17/18
A poster from a 1999 campaign from the Health Education Authority urging women not to smoke whilst pregnant
PA

18/18
Steve Plumb, 40, from Peterborough, stands next to a 2003 poster issued by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) warning of the dangers that smoking cigarettes can have on the heart
PA

Headlines touting the new policy made it clear that the platforms would ban influencers from promoting e-cigarettes and tobacco products. For example, a BBC headline announced: “Instagram e-cigarette posts banned by ad watchdog.” But they missed three crucial points. First, Facebook’s policies are designed for companies that play by the rules, not for tobacco companies whose playbook is to find ways around them or flout them.
Second, those who track the industry’s activities online say it is notoriously difficult to understand which posts come under Facebook’s “branded content” bracket. On Instagram, Big Tobacco’s influencers post glamorised images of vape products with hashtags such as #idareyoutotryit and captions such as “feeling Vype AF”. They don’t post content that simply says “paid promotion of British American Tobacco”, for example.

Finally, serious doubts remain about how any of this will be enforced. The reality is that Big Tobacco needs Instagram to survive and can’t afford to be excluded. A market research company, Klear, recently noted that 96 per cent of all brands use influencers, with Instagram the most popular platform. Klear found that global Instagram influencer marketing activity increased by 48 per cent in 2019.

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Caroline Renzulli of Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids told me: “In the weeks since the announcement that influencers would be banned from promoting tobacco and e-cigarettes, tobacco companies have continued to exploit influencer marketing on Facebook and Instagram to advertise addictive products to young people without consequence.”
She added: “Facebook and Instagram are uniquely positioned to cut off Big Tobacco’s easiest access point to kids and young people around the world – but without swift enactment and strict enforcement of new policies, the announcement is yet another hollow statement from a company that no longer has any excuse for inaction on this issue.”
Andrew Rowell is a senior research fellow at the University of Bath. This article was originally published in The Conversation

Tempemail , Tempmail Temp email addressess (10 minutes emails)– When you want to create account on some forum or social media, like Facebook, Reddit, Twitter, TikTok you have to enter information about your e-mail box to get an activation link. Unfortunately, after registration, this social media sends you dozens of messages with useless information, which you are not interested in. To avoid that, visit this Temp mail generator: tempemail.co and you will have a Temp mail disposable address and end up on a bunch of spam lists. This email will expire after 10 minute so you can call this Temp mail 10 minute email. Our service is free! Let’s enjoy!

Loot boxes in games are gambling and should be banned for kids, say UK MPs – gpgmail


UK MPs have called for the government to regulate the games industry’s use of loot boxes under current gambling legislation — urging a blanket ban on the sale of loot boxes to players who are children.

Kids should instead be able to earn in-game credits to unlock look boxes, MPs have suggested in a recommendation that won’t be music to the games industry’s ears.

Loot boxes refer to virtual items in games that can be bought with real-world money and do not reveal their contents in advance. The MPs argue the mechanic should be considered games of chance played for money’s worth and regulated by the UK Gambling Act.

The Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport’s (DCMS) parliamentary committee makes the recommendations in a report published today following an enquiry into immersive and addictive technologies that saw it take evidence from a number of tech companies including Fortnite maker Epic Games; Facebook-owned Instagram; and Snapchap.

The committee said it found representatives from the games industry to be “wilfully obtuse” in answering questions about typical patterns of play — data the report emphasizes is necessary for proper understanding of how players are engaging with games — as well as calling out some games and social media company representatives for demonstrating “a lack of honesty and transparency”, leading it to question what the companies have to hide.

“The potential harms outlined in this report can be considered the direct result of the way in which the ‘attention economy’ is driven by the objective of maximising user engagement,” the committee writes in a summary of the report which it says explores “how data-rich immersive technologies are driven by business models that combine people’s data with design practices to have powerful psychological effects”.

As well as trying to pry information about of games companies, MPs also took evidence from gamers during the course of the enquiry.

In one instance the committee heard that a gamer spent up to £1,000 per year on loot box mechanics in Electronic Arts’s Fifa series.

A member of the public also reported that their adult son had built up debts of more than £50,000 through spending on microtransactions in online game RuneScape. The maker of that game, Jagex, told the committee that players “can potentially spend up to £1,000 a week or £5,000 a month”.

In addition to calling for gambling law to be applied to the industry’s lucrative loot box mechanic, the report calls on games makers to face up to responsibilities to protect players from potential harms, saying research into possible negative psychosocial harms has been hampered by the industry’s unwillingness to share play data.

“Data on how long people play games for is essential to understand what normal and healthy — and, conversely, abnormal and potentially unhealthy — engagement with gaming looks like. Games companies collect this information for their own marketing and design purposes; however, in evidence to us, representatives from the games industry were wilfully obtuse in answering our questions about typical patterns of play,” it writes.

“Although the vast majority of people who play games find it a positive experience, the minority who struggle to maintain control over how much they are playing experience serious consequences for them and their loved ones. At present, the games industry has not sufficiently accepted responsibility for either understanding or preventing this harm. Moreover, both policy-making and potential industry interventions are being hindered by a lack of robust evidence, which in part stems from companies’ unwillingness to share data about patterns of play.”

The report recommends the government require games makers share aggregated player data with researchers, with the committee calling for a new regulator to oversee a levy on the industry to fund independent academic research — including into ‘Gaming disorder‘, an addictive condition formally designated by the World Health Organization — and to ensure that “the relevant data is made available from the industry to enable it to be effective”.

“Social media platforms and online games makers are locked in a relentless battle to capture ever more of people’s attention, time and money. Their business models are built on this, but it’s time for them to be more responsible in dealing with the harms these technologies can cause for some users,” said DCMS committee chair, Damian Collins, in a statement.

“Loot boxes are particularly lucrative for games companies but come at a high cost, particularly for problem gamblers, while exposing children to potential harm. Buying a loot box is playing a game of chance and it is high time the gambling laws caught up. We challenge the Government to explain why loot boxes should be exempt from the Gambling Act.

“Gaming contributes to a global industry that generates billions in revenue. It is unacceptable that some companies with millions of users and children among them should be so ill-equipped to talk to us about the potential harm of their products. Gaming disorder based on excessive and addictive game play has been recognised by the World Health Organisation. It’s time for games companies to use the huge quantities of data they gather about their players, to do more to proactively identify vulnerable gamers.”

The committee wants independent research to inform the development of a behavioural design code of practice for online services. “This should be developed within an adequate timeframe to inform the future online harms regulator’s work around ‘designed addiction’ and ‘excessive screen time’,” it writes, citing the government’s plan for a new Internet regulator for online harms.

MPs are also concerned about the lack of robust age verification to keep children off age-restricted platforms and games.

The report identifies inconsistencies in the games industry’s ‘age-ratings’ stemming from self-regulation around the distribution of games (such as online games not being subject to a legally enforceable age-rating system, meaning voluntary ratings are used instead).

“Games companies should not assume that the responsibility to enforce age-ratings applies exclusively to the main delivery platforms: All companies and platforms that are making games available online should uphold the highest standards of enforcing age-ratings,” the committee writes on that.

“Both games companies and the social media platforms need to establish effective age verification tools. They currently do not exist on any of the major platforms which rely on self-certification from children and adults,” Collins adds.

During the enquiry it emerged that the UK government is working with tech companies including Snap to try to devise a centralized system for age verification for online platforms.

A section of the report on Effective Age Verification cites testimony from deputy information commissioner Steve Wood raising concerns about any move towards “wide-spread age verification [by] collecting hard identifiers from people, like scans of passports”.

Wood instead pointed the committee towards technological alternatives, such as age estimation, which he said uses “algorithms running behind the scenes using different types of data linked to the self-declaration of the age to work out whether this person is the age they say they are when they are on the platform”.

Snapchat’s Will Scougal also told the committee that its platform is able to monitor user signals to ensure users are the appropriate age — by tracking behavior and activity; location; and connections between users to flag a user as potentially underage. 

The report also makes a recommendation on deepfake content, with the committee saying that malicious creation and distribution of deepfake videos should be regarded as harmful content.

“The release of content like this could try to influence the outcome of elections and undermine people’s public reputation,” it warns. “Social media platforms should have clear policies in place for the removal of deepfakes. In the UK, the Government should include action against deepfakes as part of the duty of care social media companies should exercise in the interests of their users, as set out in the Online Harms White Paper.”

“Social media firms need to take action against known deepfake films, particularly when they have been designed to distort the appearance of people in an attempt to maliciously damage their public reputation, as was seen with the recent film of the Speaker of the US House of Representatives, Nancy Pelosi,” adds Collins.


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